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  1. Avner Baz (forthcoming). On Going Nowhere with Our Words: New Skepticism About the Philosophical Method of Cases. Philosophical Psychology:1-20.
    The philosophical “method of cases” has been the subject of intense discussion. In a recent paper, Frank Jackson attempts to vindicate the method by proposing that it is underwritten by the “representational view of language.” Jackson's proposal is potentially very significant. For if it is true, then the method of cases stands, but quite possibly also falls, with the representational view of language as characterized by Jackson. The aim of this paper is to question the philosophical method of cases by (...)
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  2. Avner Baz (2015). The Sound of Bedrock: Lines of Grammar Between Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (4):n/a-n/a.
    In ‘Aesthetics Problems of Modern Philosophy’ Stanley Cavell proposes, first, that Kant's characterization of judgments of beauty may be read as a Wittgensteinian grammatical characterization, and, second, that the philosophical appeal to ‘what we say and mean’ partakes of the grammar of judgment of beauty. I argue first that the expression of the dawning of an aspect partakes of the grammar of judgments of beauty as characterized by Kant, and may also be seen—on a prevailing way of thinking about concepts (...)
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  3. Avner Baz (2014). Recent Attempts to Defend the Philosophical Method of Cases and the Linguistic Turn. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (1):n/a-n/a.
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  4. Avner Baz (2012). Must Philosopherss Rely On Intuitions? Journal of Philosophy 109 (4):316-337.
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  5. Avner Baz (2012). When Words Are Called For: A Defense of Ordinary Language Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    The basic conflict: an initial characterization -- The main arguments against ordinary language philosophy -- Must philosophers rely on intuitions? -- Contextualism and the burden of knowledge -- Contextualism, anti-contextualism, and knowing as being in a position to give assurance -- Conclusion: skepticism and the dialectic of (semantically pure) "knowledge" -- Epilogue: ordinary language philosophy, Kant, and the roots of antinomial thinking.
     
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  6. Avner Baz (2011). Aspect Perception and Philosophical Difficulty. In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oup Oxford.
     
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  7. Andrew Altman, Michael Barnhart, Avner Baz, David Benatar, Yitzhak Benbaji, Talia Bettcher, Brian Bix, Jeffrey Bland-Ballard & Lene Bomann-Larsen (2010). Referees for Volume 7. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):541-542.
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  8. Avner Baz (2010). Geach's 'Refutation' of Austin Revisited. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):pp. 41-62.
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  9. Avner Baz (2010). On Learning From Wittgenstein, or What Does It Take to See the Grammar of Seeing Aspects? In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  10. Avner Baz (2009). Who Knows? European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):201-223.
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  11. Avner Baz (2008). Being Right, and Being in the Right. Inquiry 51 (6):627 – 644.
    This paper presents a critique of a prevailing conception of the relation between moral reasoning and judgment on the one hand, and moral goodness on the other. I argue that moral reasoning is inescapably vulnerable to moral, as opposed to merely theoretical, failure. This, I argue, means that there is something deeply misleading in the way that Kant's moral theory, and some of its main rivals, have invited us to conceive of their subject matter.
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  12. Avner Baz (2008). The Reaches of Words. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (1):31 – 56.
    This paper compares and contrasts two ways of going on from Wittgenstein and, to a lesser extent, Austin. The first is Charles Travis'. The second is Stanley Cavell's. Focusing on our concept of propositional knowledge ('knowing that such and such'), I argue that Travis' tendency to think of language and its concepts as essentially in the business of enabling us to represent (describe, think of) things as being one way or another and his consequent neglect of the question of what, (...)
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  13. Avner Baz (2005). Kant's Principle of Purposiveness and the Missing Point of (Aesthetic) Judgements. Kantian Review 10 (1):1-32.
    My plan in this article is to begin by raising the question of the point of judgements of beauty, and then to examine Kant's account of beauty in the third Critique from the perspective opened up by that question. Having raised the question of the point, I will argue, first, that there is an implied answer to it in Kant's text, and, second, that the answer is ultimately unsatisfying in that it falsely assumes that there is a ‘need’, or ‘task’, (...)
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  14. Avner Baz (2005). Moral Justification and the Idea of an Ethical Position. Philosophy 80 (1):101-123.
    In this paper I develop a critique of Kantian ethics, and more precisely a critique of a particular conception of moral reasoning. The fundamental assumption that underlies the conception that I am targeting is that to justify (morally or otherwise) an action is (perhaps with an ‘all things being equal’ clause) to settle its value, in such a way that all rational participants would have to acknowledge that value. As an alternative to the Kantian conception, I propose a conception in (...)
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  15. Avner Baz (2004). What's the Point of Calling Out Beauty? British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):57-72.
    The purpose of this paper is to use Kant's Critique of Judgement in order to raise and motivate the question of the point of judgements of beauty, to illustrate the philosophical tendency to neglect or even repress it, and to begin to look for an answer to that question. On the way, I will consider Kant's implied answer to the question and will argue that it is unsatisfactory in that it relies on a false picture of the everyday subject's relation (...)
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  16. Avner Baz (2003). On When Words Are Called For: Cavell, McDowell, and the Wording of the World. Inquiry 46 (4):473 – 500.
    In Mind and World and related works, John McDowell attempts to offer us an understanding of the relation between our experience of the world and our wording of it. In arguing for this understanding, McDowell sees himself as engaged in a Wittgensteinian exorcism of a philosophical puzzlement; and his aim is to recover for us a truly satisfying way of conceiving of the relation between our words and our world. Taking my bearing from Stanley Cavell's reading of Wittgenstein, in which, (...)
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  17. Avner Baz (2000). On the Point of What We Say: Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell on When Words Are Called For. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago
    The dissertation consists of three separate but related papers. The papers investigate various ways in which questions of value bear on questions of intelligibility, and vice versa. The guiding idea is the Wittgensteinian insight, explored by Stanley Cavell, that our intelligibility, to ourselves and to others, and in particular our saying anything with our words, is a matter of making a point. In the first paper I offer a reading guided by this insight, of Wittgenstein's remarks on 'seeing aspects'. In (...)
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  18. Avner Baz (2000). What's the Point of Seeing Aspects? Philosophical Investigations 23 (2):97–121.
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