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Avrum Stroll [71]Avrumed Stroll [1]
  1. Avrum Stroll (2010). Review of Hans-Johann Glock (Ed.), Wittgenstein and Analytic Philosophy: Essays for P.M.S. Hacker. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 60 (241):865-867.
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  2. Avrum Stroll (2009). A Defense of Same-Sex Marriage. Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (4):343-355.
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  3. Avrum Stroll (2009). Informal Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Informal Philosophy provides an original look at how we should understand and teach philosophy.
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  4. Avrum Stroll (2009). Metaphysics Revivified. In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge.
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  5. Avrum Stroll (2009). Wittgenstein and the Dream Hypothesis. Philosophia 37 (4):681-690.
    The paper deals with Wittgenstein’s treatment of radical skepticism. He holds from his earliest work to his last that skepticism is senseless and therefore no rebuttal, such as G.E. Moore offered, is necessary.
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  6. Avrum Stroll (2007). Much Ado About Nonexistence: Fiction and Reference. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  7. Avrum Stroll (2004). Deconstruction as Analytic Philosophy. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):358-360.
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  8. Avrum Stroll & Frederick Olafson (2004). Zeno Vendler, 1921-2004. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 77 (5):172 - 173.
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  9. Avrum Stroll (2003). Broadened Logic. Topoi 22 (1):93-104.
    The early formal logicians (Frege, Russell, Peano et al.) were worried about differentiating logic from psychology. As a result, they interpreted logic in the most abstract way possible: as a theory about inference patterns whose terms lacked descriptive content. Such a theory was also acontextual. What they did not realize was that psychological concepts like expecting someone, doubting, pain etc. each had their own logic, a logic that had two features: it was contextually oriented and its concepts had a restricted (...)
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  10. Avrum Stroll (2002). Due concezioni di superficie. Rivista di Estetica 42 (20):30-45.
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  11. Avrum Stroll (2002). Interpretation and Meaning. Inquiry 45 (2):145 – 160.
    The article describes and attempts to resolve a problem that arises for interpreters, translators, teachers, linguists, literary critics, and lawyers. Professional interpreters, for example, see themselves as the impartial transmitters of messages. Their dilemma notably arises in legal contexts when judges and prosecutors use language that is technical and belongs to a political system whose traditions are unfamiliar to defendants. In an effort to explain what such concepts as 'habeas corpus' and 'taking the fifth amendment' mean to Spanish-speaking monoglots, for (...)
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  12. Avrum Stroll (2002). Review of Juliet Floyd, Sanford Shieh (Eds.), Future Pasts: The Analytic Tradition in Twentieth-Century Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (4).
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  13. Avrum Stroll (2001). Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1).
    Analytic philosophy is difficult to define since it is not so much a specific doctrine as a loose concatenation of approaches to problems. As well as having strong ties to scientism -the notion that only the methods of the natural sciences give rise to knowledge -it also has humanistic ties to the great thinkers and philosophical problems of the past. Moreover, no single feature characterizes the activities of analytic philosophers. Undaunted by these difficulties, Avrum Stroll investigates the "family resemblances" between (...)
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  14. Avrum Stroll (1998). Proper Names, Names, and Fictive Objects. Journal of Philosophy 95 (10):522-534.
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  15. Avrum Stroll (1998). The Fragility of Moral Principles. Topoi 17 (2):137-147.
    According to a widely accepted conceptual model, principles play essential roles in moral reasoning: it is asserted that they hold universally and cannot be avoided in the justification of human action and belief. This paper challenges that view. It argues that, though some principles play such substantive roles, most do not. They can be characterized instead as being fragile or defeasible, i.e., they are capable of being weakened, voided or undone. The claim is made that it is the pressures exerted (...)
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  16. Avrum Stroll (1997). Sketches of Landscapes: Philosophy by Example. A Bradford Book.
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  17. Avrum Stroll (1994). Moore and Wittgenstein on Certainty. Oxford University Press.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein's On Certainty was finished just before his death in 1951 and is a running commentary on three of G.E. Moore's greatest epistemological papers. In the early 1930s, Moore had written a lengthy commentary on Wittgenstein, anticipating some of the issues Wittgenstein would discuss in On Certainty. The philosophical relationship between these two great philosophers and their overlapping, but nevertheless differing, views is the subject of this book. Both defended the existence of certainty and thus opposed any form of (...)
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  18. Rudolf Arnheim, Charles Gauss, Richard Kuhns, Avrum Stroll, Selma Jeanne Cohen, Gordon Epperson, Arnold Berleant, Hilde Hein & Charles Hartshorne (1993). Reminiscences. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (2):279-289.
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  19. Avrum Stroll (1993). That Puzzle We Call the Mind. Grazer Philosophische Studien 44:189-210.
    The human mind remains a mystery despite the best efforts of philosophers to understand it. Each person knows that he/she has a mind, regards it as something internal, and is aware of its operations. Yet nobody knows what it is. The reason why the mind is so puzzling turns on three of its features: its invisibility while operating, the unique access which its proprietor has to it, and the inability to give a clear meaning to the polar notions of 'internal-external' (...)
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  20. Avrum Stroll (1992). Reflections on Surfaces. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):191-210.
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  21. Avrum Stroll (1991). Observation and the Hidden. Dialectica 45 (2‐3):165-179.
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  22. Avrum Stroll (1990). Max on Moore. Dialectica 44 (1‐2):153-163.
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  23. Avrum Stroll (1989). What Water Is or Back to Thales. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 14 (1):258-274.
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  24. Avrum Stroll (1989). On Surfaces: A Rejoinder. Inquiry 32 (2):223 – 231.
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  25. Avrum Stroll (1989). Wittgenstein's Nose. In Brian McGuinness & Rudolf Haller (eds.), Wittgenstein in Focus--Im Brennpunkt: Wittgenstein. Rodopi. 395-413.
    J.J. Gibson claims that one who is looking at Niagara Falls is seeing it directly, whereas one who is looking at a picture of Niagara Falls is seeing it indirectly or mediately. Gibson's cognitivist critics claim that all perception is mediated and that "external objects" are never seen directly. Each side takes the debate to be a scientific issue. But following Wittgenstein's "nose" for detecting philosophical intrusions into what do not appear to be philosophical debates, the author shows how such (...)
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  26. Avrum Stroll (1988). Bloomsbury's Prophet. G. E. Moore and the Development of His Moral Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (3):504-505.
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  27. Avrum Stroll (1988). Pragmatics and Empiricism. International Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):111-113.
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  28. Avrum Stroll (1988). Scepticism and Religious Toleration. History of Philosophy Quarterly 5 (3):221 - 232.
  29. Avrum Stroll (1988). The Liar: What Paradox? [REVIEW] Argumentation 2 (1):63-75.
    Most philosophers believe that the Liar Paradox is semantical in character, and arises from difficulties in the predicate “true.” The author argues that the paradox is pragmatic, not semantic, and arises from violations of essential conditions that define statement-making speech acts. The author shows that his solution to the paradox will not only handle the classical Liar sentences that are “necessarily” or “intrinsically” paradoxical, but also sets of Kripke-sentences that are “contingently” paradoxical.
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  30. Mary Rorty, Claudia Card, Elizabeth Eames, Virginia Held, Helen Longino, Susan Mattingly, Susan Salladay, Avrum Stroll & Joyce Trebilcot (1987). Special Report: Women in Philosophy. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 60 (4):681 - 698.
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  31. Avrum Stroll (1987). Foundationalism and Common Sense. Philosophical Investigations 10 (4):279-298.
    The paper attempts to do two things: (1) to give a detailed account of what conditions must be satisfied by theories that hold some knowledge to be more fundamental than the rest, And (2) it asks, And answers affirmatively, Whether there is such a foundationalist account in wittgenstein's "on certainty".
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  32. Avrum Stroll (1987). Seeing Surfaces. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 10 (1):379-398.
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  33. Avrum Stroll (1987). Counting Surfaces. American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (1):97 - 101.
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  34. Avrum Stroll (1987). Norms. Dialectica 41 (1‐2):7-22.
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  35. Avrum Stroll (1986). The Role of Surfaces in an Ecological Theory of Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (March):437-453.
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  36. Avrum Stroll (1985). Faces. Inquiry 28 (1-4):177 – 194.
    In the philosophical and psychological literature of the twentieth century, the concept of a surface plays a pervasive and important role, mostly in connection with theories of perception. The author argues that the concept has interesting logical and ontological uses as well. The focus of the paper is on the question of whether surfaces are real ingredients in the world, and the argument of the paper is that, under certain construals, they are.
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  37. Avrum Stroll (1984). Some Different Ways That Things Stand Fast for Us. Grazer Philosophische Studien 22:69-89.
    Foundationalism, the idea that there is a basic kind of knowledge which is ground-level and hence beyond proof or justification, is one of the oldest themes in philosophy. It has been held by such great philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Wittgenstein and Moore inter alia\ but exactly what they mean by "foundationalism" is seldom carefully or fully articulated. This paper attempts to give such an explication. It holds that a foundationalist theory must satisfy at least nine conditions, vagueness, stratification, (...)
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  38. Avrum Stroll (1982). Oswald Hanfling, Logical Positivism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 2 (5):219-221.
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  39. Avrum Stroll (1982). Primordial Knowledge and Rationality. Dialectica 36 (2‐3):179-201.
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  40. Avrum Stroll (1982). The Mimesis Theory. Philosophical Inquiry 4 (2):64-77.
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  41. Avrum Stroll (1979). Two Conceptions of Surfaces. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 4 (1):277-291.
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  42. Avrum Stroll (1979). Epistemology: New Essays in the Theory of Knowledge. Greenwood Press.
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  43. Avrum Stroll (1979). Moore's Proof of an External World. Dialectica 33 (3‐4):379-397.
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  44. Avrum Stroll (1978). Four Comments on Russell's Theory of Descriptions. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):147 - 155.
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  45. Avrum Stroll & Robert Foelber (1977). Talk About Talk About Surfaces. Dialectica 31 (3‐4):409-430.
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  46. Avrum Stroll (1976). Truth‐Bearers, Propositions and the Problem of Universals. Dialectica 30 (1):17-34.
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  47. Avrum Stroll (1975). Russell's "Proof". Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (4):653 - 662.
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  48. Avrum Stroll & Henry Alexander (1975). 'True' and Truth. Philosophy of Science 42 (4):384-410.
    In Parts I, II, and III of the paper, the authors show that an argument essential to Alan White's defense of the Correspondence Theory of truth is unsuccessful. They argue that some of the premises of White's argument are false, and others incoherent. They show, further, that certain widely accepted assumptions in the philosophy of language, which underlie White's argument, must also be abandoned. In Part IV, they attempt to say something new about 'true', 'false', truth and falsity, and related (...)
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  49. Avrum Stroll (1973). A Reply to Professor Sard. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (3):393-393.
    Professor sard states that russell's response to ronald searle rests on a fallacy. Russell states that he dreamt of one thing not in heaven or earth, While searle says that there are more things in heaven than russell dreamt of. Stroll argues that sard's interpretation of the phrase "there are more things in heaven than are dreamed of" is mistaken. Russell interprets this to mean that taking a to be the set of all things capable of being dreamed of in (...)
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