Search results for 'Aysel Dog˘an' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Aysel Dog (2011). A Defense of Animal Rights. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):473-491.score: 240.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kristien Hens (2009). Ethical Responsibilities Towards Dogs: An Inquiry Into the Dog–Human Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):3-14.score: 112.0
    The conditions of life of many companion animals and the rate at which they are surrendered to shelters raise many ethical issues. What duties do we have towards the dogs that live in our society? To suggest answers to these questions, I first give four possible ways of looking at the relationship between man and dog: master–slave, employer–worker, parent–child, and friend–friend. I argue that the morally acceptable relationships are of a different kind but bears family resemblances to the latter three. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Aysel Dog˘an (2011). A Defense of Animal Rights. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):473-491.score: 87.0
    I argue that animals have rights in the sense of having valid claims, which might turn out to be actual rights as society advances and new scientific-technological developments facilitate finding alternative ways of satisfying our vital interests without using animals. Animals have a right to life, to liberty in the sense of freedom of movement and communication, to subsistence, to relief from suffering, and to security against attacks on their physical existence. Animals’ interest in living, freedom, subsistence, and security are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. W. N. Kellogg, James Deese, N. H. Pronko & M. Feinberg (1947). An Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (2):99.score: 84.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. P. S. Shurrager (1947). A Comment on 'an Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog.'. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (3):261-263.score: 84.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ignacio Javier Lopez (2003). Film, Freud, and Paranoia: Dali and the Representation of Male Desire in An Andalusian Dog. Diacritics 31 (2):35-48.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Hilda Kean (2003). An Exploration of the Sculptures of Greyfriars Bobby, Edinburgh, Scotland, and the Brown Dog, Battersea, South London, England. Society and Animals 11 (4):353-373.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jessica Greenebaum (2009). "I'm Not an Activist!": Animal Rights Vs. Animal Welfare in the Purebred Dog Rescue Movement. Society and Animals 17 (4):289-304.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Clinton R. Sanders (2011). Living and Dying with an Ordinary Remarkable Dog A Little Big Life: A Memoir of a Joyful Dog. Society and Animals 19 (1):109-112.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. P. P. J. (1905). Cerberus, the Dog of Hades: The History of an Idea. By Maurice Bloomfield. Chicago: The Open Court Publishing Company; London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner and Co. 1905. Pp. 41. With Frontispiece. 2s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 19 (08):412-.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Cynthia Damon (2008). The Mind of an Ass and the Impudence of a Dog': A Scholar Gone Bad. In I. Sluiter & Ralph Mark Rosen (eds.), Kakos: Badness and Anti-Value in Classical Antiquity. Brill. 307--335.score: 72.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Daniel C. Dennett (1990). Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):76-77.score: 72.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Armond Duwell (2004). How to Teach an Old Dog New Tricks: Quantum Information, Quantum Computing, and the Philosophy of Physics. Dissertation, University of Pittsburghscore: 72.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Cathryn Bailey (2009). A Man and a Dog in a Lifeboat: Self-Sacrifice, Animals, and the Limits of Ethical Theory. Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 129-148.score: 42.0
    In discussions of animal ethics, hypothetical scenarios are often used to try to force the clarification of intuitions about the relative value of human and animal life. Tom Regan requests, for example, that we imagine a man and a dog adrift in a lifeboat while Peter Singer explains why the life of one's child ought to be preferred to that of the family dog in the event of a house fire. I argue that such scenarios are not the usefully abstract (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michael Rescorla (2009). Chrysippus' Dog as a Case Study in Non-Linguistic Cognition. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 52--71.score: 42.0
    I critique an ancient argument for the possibility of non-linguistic deductive inference. The argument, attributed to Chrysippus, describes a dog whose behavior supposedly reflects disjunctive syllogistic reasoning. Drawing on contemporary robotics, I urge that we can equally well explain the dog's behavior by citing probabilistic reasoning over cognitive maps. I then critique various experimentally-based arguments from scientific psychology that echo Chrysippus's anecdotal presentation.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ron Chrisley (2008). Painting an Experience: Las Meninas, Consciousness and the Aesthetic Mode. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):40-45.score: 42.0
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Michael Tye (2008). The Experience of Emotion: An Intentionalist Theory. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 62:25--50.score: 42.0
    The experience of emotion is a fundamental part of human consciousness. Think, for example, of how different our conscious lives would be without such experiences as joy, anger, fear, disgust, pity, anxiety, and embarrassment. It is uncontroversial that these experiences typically have an intentional content. Anger, for example, is normally directed at someone or something. One may feel angry at one=s stock broker for provid- ing bad advice or angry with the cleaning lady for dropping the vase. But it is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Crawford L. Elder (2007). On the Phenomenon of "Dog-Wise Arrangement". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):132–155.score: 42.0
    An influential line of thought in metaphysics holds that where common sense discerns a tree or a dog or a baseball there may be just many microparticles. Provided the microparticles are arranged in the right way -- are “treewise” or “dogwise” or “baseballwise” arranged -- our sensory experiences will be just the same as if a tree or dog or baseball were really there. Therefore whether there really are suchfamiliar objects in the world can be decided only by determining what (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ron Chrisley, Painting an Experience.score: 42.0
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael Gary Duncan (2012). The Curious Silence of the Dog and Paul of Tarsus; Revisiting The Argument From Silence. Informal Logic 32 (1):83-97.score: 42.0
    In this essay I propose an interpretative and explanatory structure for the so-called argumentum ex silento, or argument from silence (henceforth referred to as the AFS). To this end, I explore two examples, namely, Sherlock Holmes’s oft-quoted notice of the “curious incident of the dog in the night-time” from Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story “Silver Blaze,” and the historical question of Paul of Tarsus’s silence on biographical details of the historical Jesus. Through these cases, I conclude that the AFS serves (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Crawford L. Elder (2007). On the Phenomenon of “Dog- Wise Arrangement”. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):132-155.score: 42.0
    An influential line of thought in metaphysics holds that where common sense discerns a tree or a dog or a baseball there may be just many microparticles. Provided the microparticles are arranged in the right way -- are “treewise” or “dogwise” or “baseballwise” arranged -- our sensory experiences will be just the same as if a tree or dog or baseball were really there. Therefore whether there really are suchfamiliar objects in the world can be decided only by determining what (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Kennan Ferguson (2004). I ♥ My Dog. Political Theory 32 (3):373-395.score: 42.0
    Virtually all political theory and ethical systems presuppose the primacy of human beings. Abstract human beings have rights, privileges, legal standing, and-it is said-claims to our sympathy. Many political debates, therefore, center on questions of where these lines are to be drawn. But many humans do not behave this way. People, for example, may expend far more love, time, money, and energy on their pets' well-being than on abstract humans. If the choice is between an operation to save their dog's (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Riin Magnus (forthcoming). The Function, Formation and Development of Signs in the Guide Dog Team's Work. Biosemiotics:1-17.score: 42.0
    Relying on interviews and fieldwork observations, the article investigates the choice of signs made by guide dogs and their visually impaired handlers while the team is on the move. It also explores the dependence of the choice of signs on specific functions of communication and examines the changes and development of sign usage throughout the team’s work. A significant part of the team’s communication appears to be related to retaining the communicative situation itself: to the establishment of intrateam contact; to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ephraim Nissan (2011). The Dog Ate It. American Journal of Semiotics 27 (1/4):115 - 162.score: 42.0
    Several facets of the “flimsy pretext” archetype “My dog ate my homework” are analysed. We do so by considering textual accounts of events from real life filteredthrough the media, and we resort to formalisms (episodic formulae, Wigmore Charts) to capture some aspects of their gist. We also analyse several gag cartoons,either one-panel or multi-panel, and either as produced by others, or ones authored by this writer for the very purpose of probing into potential uses of the archetype. Sometimes the archetype (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Zsófia Virányi Teresa Schmidjell, Friederike Range, Ludwig Huber (2012). Do Owners Have a Clever Hans Effect on Dogs? Results of a Pointing Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 42.0
    Dogs are exceptionally successful at interpreting human pointing gestures to locate food hidden in one of two containers. However, whether dogs are totally reliant on the pointing gesture itself, or if their success is increased by subtle cues from their human handler has repeatedly been questioned. In two experiments we used a standard two-way object-choice task to focus on this potential Clever Hans effect and investigated if and how owners’ knowledge and beliefs influenced their dogs’ performance. In both experiments, as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Rainer Wohlfarth, Bettina Mutschler, Andrea Beetz, Friederike Kreuser & Ulrike Korsten-Reck (2013). Dogs Motivate Obese Children for Physical Activity: Key Elements of a Motivational Theory of Animal-Assisted Interventions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 42.0
    Background: There is empirical evidence that the presence of a companion animal can have a positive impact on performance. The available evidence can be viewed in terms of differing hypotheses that attempt to explain the mechanisms behind the positive effects. Little attention has been given to motivation as a potential mode of action with regards to human-animal interactions. First we give an overview of evidence that animals might promote motivation. Second we present a study to examine the effect of a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Georges Rey (2014). Innate and Learned: Carey, Mad Dog Nativism, and the Poverty of Stimuli and Analogies (Yet Again). Mind and Language 29 (2):109-132.score: 42.0
    In her recent (2009) book, The Origins of Concepts, Susan Carey argues that what she calls ‘Quinean Bootstrapping’ and processes of analogy in children show that the expressive power of a mind can be increased in ways that refute Jerry Fodor's (1975, 2008) ‘Mad Dog’ view that all concepts are innate. I argue that it is doubtful any evidence about the manifestation of concepts in children will bear upon the logico-semantic issues of expressive power. Analogy and bootstrapping may be ways (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Matteo E. Bonfanti (2014). From Sniffer Dogs to Emerging Sniffer Devices for Airport Security: An Opportunity to Rethink Privacy Implications? Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):791-807.score: 36.0
    Dogs are known for their incredible ability to detect odours, extracting them from a “complex” environment and recognising them. This makes sniffer dogs precious assets in a broad variety of security applications. However, their use is subject to some intrinsic restrictions. Dogs can only be trained to a limited set of applications, get tired after a relatively short period, and thus require a high turnover. This has sparked a drive over the past decade to develop artificial sniffer devices—generally known as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Richard Smith (2011). On Dogs and Children: Judgements in the Realm of Meaning. Ethics and Education 6 (2):171-180.score: 30.0
    When we say that good parenting is an ethical and not a technical matter, what is the nature of the warrant we can give for identifying one way of parenting as good and another as bad? There is, of course, a general issue here about the giving of reasons in ethics. The issue may seem to arise with peculiar force in parenting since parenting casts our whole being into uncertainty: here, above all, it seems, we do not scrutinise our commitments (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. David McFarland (2008). Guilty Robots, Happy Dogs: The Question of Alien Minds. OUP Oxford.score: 30.0
    When we interact with animals, we intuitively read thoughts and feelings into their expressions and actions - it is easy to suppose that they have minds like ours. And as technology grows more sophisticated, we might soon find ourselves interpreting the behaviour of robots too in human terms. -/- It is natural for us to humanize other beings in this way, but is it philosophically or scientifically justifiable? How different might the minds of animals or machines be to ours? As (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Colin Radford (1970). Hoping, Wishing, and Dogs. Inquiry 13 (1-4):100 – 103.score: 30.0
    Although dogs are almost totally incapable of symbolic behaviour, they can hope, for a dog's behaviour can manifest not only a desire for something but varying degrees of expectation that it will get what it desires; but since they are almost totally incapable of symbolic behaviour, nothing they do can indicate that they both desire something and yet are certain that they will not get it. So the suggestion that dogs entertain idle wishes is, apparently, vacuous, i.e. untestable, or nonsensical. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Günther Rohdenburg (1985). Dogs, Bitches and Other Creatures. Journal of Semantics 4 (2):117-135.score: 30.0
    ABSTRACTIn an attempt to uphold a specific constraint on sentential ambiguity Kempson (1980) has proposed an elaborate framework for dealing with the semantic duality of items such as dog. Her analysis culminates in a duality principle relating the specific and the general interpretation of the terms in question. These proposals are shown to have a number of serious shortcomings. First, they do not allow for the fact that the two relevant interpretations may vary in strength, and that independently of each (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jessica Pierce (2012). The Last Walk: Reflections on Our Pets at the End of Their Lives. The University of Chicago Press.score: 28.0
    Drawing on the moving story of the last year of the life of her own treasured dog, Ody, she presents an in-depth exploration of the practical, medical, and moral issues that trouble pet owners confronted with the decline and death of their ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. H. Dog˘an & M. Deg˘Er (2001). Case Study,Informed Consent, Surrogate Decision Makers, Conflict of Autonomy and the Paternalistic Approach: A Case Report From Turkey. Nursing Ethics 8 (6):556-561.score: 28.0
  35. Cordelia Fine (2006). Is the Emotional Dog Wagging its Rational Tail, or Chasing It? Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):83 – 98.score: 24.0
    According to Haidt's (2001) social intuitionist model (SIM), an individual's moral judgment normally arises from automatic 'moral intuitions'. Private moral reasoning - when it occurs - is biased and post hoc, serving to justify the moral judgment determined by the individual's intuitions. It is argued here, however, that moral reasoning is not inevitably subserviant to moral intuitions in the formation of moral judgments. Social cognitive research shows that moral reasoning may sometimes disrupt the automatic process of judgment formation described by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Parker Crutchfield (2011). Representing High-Level Properties in Perceptual Experience. Philosophical Psychology 25 (2):279 - 294.score: 24.0
    High-level theory is the view that high-level properties?the property of being a dog, being a tiger, being an apple, being a pair of lips, etc.?can be represented in perceptual experience. Low-level theory denies this and claims that high-level properties are only represented at the level of perceptual judgment and are products of cognitive interpretation of low-level sensory information (color, shape, illumination). This paper discusses previous attempts to establish high-level theory, their weaknesses, and an argument for high-level theory that does not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Mark Rowlands, Animals That Act for Moral Reasons.score: 24.0
    Non-human animals (henceforth, “animals”) are typically regarded as moral patients rather than moral agents. Let us define these terms as follows: 1) X is a moral patient if and only if X is a legitimate object of moral concern: that is, roughly, X is something whose interests should be taken into account when decisions are made concerning it or which otherwise impact on it. 2) X is a moral agent if and only if X can be morally evaluated–praised or blamed (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Paul Gregory (2003). Putting the Bite Back Into. Principia 7 (1-2):115-129.score: 24.0
    Recent Carnap scholarship suggests that the received view of the Carnap-Quine analyticity debate is importantly mistaken. It has been suggested that Carnap’s analyticity distinction is immune from Quine’s criticisms. This is either because Quine did not understand Carnap’s use of analytic-ity, or because Quine did not appreciate that, rather than dispelling dog-mas, he was merely offering an alternate framework for philosophy. It has also been suggested that ultimately nothing of substance turns on this dis-pute. I am sympathetic to these reassessments (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. David Degrazia (2007). The Harm of Death, Time-Relative Interests, and Abortion. Philosophical Forum 38 (1):57–80.score: 24.0
    Regarding the sinking lifeboat scenario involving several human beings and a dog, nearly everyone agrees that it is right to sacrifice the dog. I suggest that the best explanation for this considered judgment, an explanation that appears to time-relative interests, contains a key insight about prudential value. This insight, I argue, also provides perhaps the most promising reply to the future-like-ours argument, which is widely regarded as the strongest moral argument against abortion. Providing a solution to a longstanding puzzle in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jack C. Lyons (2005). Clades, Capgras, and Perceptual Kinds. Philosophical Topics 33 (1):185-206.score: 24.0
    I defend a moderate (neither extremely conservative nor extremely liberal) view about the contents of perception. I develop an account of perceptual kinds as perceptual similarity classes, which are convex regions in similarity space. Different perceivers will enjoy different perceptual kinds. I argue that for any property P, a perceptual state of O can represent something as P only if P is coextensive with some perceptual kind for O. 'Dog' and 'chair' will be perceptual kinds for most normal people, 'blackpool (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Edmond Leo Wright, Sensing as Non-Epistemic.score: 24.0
    A sensory receptor, in any organism anywhere, is sensitive through time to some distribution - energy, motion, molecular shape - indeed, anything that can produce an effect. The sensitivity is rarely direct: for example, it may track changes in relative variation rather than the absolute change of state (as when the skin responds to colder and hotter instead of to cold and hot as such); it may track differing variations under different conditions (the eyes' dark-adaptation; adaptation to sound frequencies can (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Eric Swanson, Pronouns and Complex Demonstratives.score: 24.0
    Until recently it was standard to think that all demonstratives are directly referential. This assumption has played important roles in work on perception, reference, mental content, and the nature of propositions. But Jeff King claims that demonstratives with a nominal complement (like ‘that dog’) are quantifiers, largely because there are cases in which the semantic value of such a “complex demonstrative” is not simply an object (2001). Although I agree with King that such cases preclude a directly referential, Kaplanian semantics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Hagit Benbaji (2013). How is Recalcitrant Emotion Possible? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (3):577-599.score: 24.0
    A recalcitrant emotion is an emotion that we experience despite a judgment that seems to conflict with it. Having been bitten by a dog in her childhood, Jane cannot shake her fear of dogs, including Fido, the cute little puppy that she knows to be in no way dangerous. There is something puzzling about recalcitrant emotions, which appear to defy the putatively robust connection between emotions and judgments. If Jane really believes that Fido cannot harm her, what is she afraid (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Josh Parsons (2006). Topological Drinking Problems. Analysis 66 (290):149–154.score: 24.0
    In my (2004), I argued that it is possible to drink any finite amount of alcohol without ever suffering a hangover by completing a certain kind of supertask. Assume that a drink causes drunkenness to ensue immediately and to last for a period proportional to the quantity of alcohol consumed; that a hangover begins immediately at the time the drunkenness ends and lasts for the same length of time as the drunkenness; and that at any time during which you are (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Michael Smith, Schiffers’s Unhappy Face Solution to a Puzzle About Moral Judgement.score: 24.0
    where, according to Schiffer, the concept of an F is pleonastic just in case the concept itself licenses entailments of the form: S ⇒ ∃xFx. These are what he calls "somethingfrom-nothing" entailments and the various practices in which such entailments are made are what he calls "hypostatisizing practices" (p.57). The concept of a proposition is pleonastic, according to this definition, because it licenses the move from a claim like 'Fido is a dog,' a claim containing only the singular term 'Fido' (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Peter J. King (1993). Lycan on Lewis and Meinong. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93:193 - 201.score: 24.0
    In his 1988 review of On the Plurality of Worlds (Lycan [1988]), William Lycan argued that what he called Lewis's 'mad-dog modal realism' (also 'rape-and-loot modal realism' and 'nuclear-holocaust modal realism' - I suspect that some reference to the supposed extremity of Lewis's position is intended) rested upon an unanalysed modal notion. Lycan accepted that actualists all seemed to be stuck with such unanalysed notions (adding that his own was the notion of compatibility as applied to pairs of properties), but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Dr H. Stefan Bracha (2006). Human Brain Evolution and the "Neuroevolutionary Time-Depth Principle:" Implications for the Reclassification of Fear-Circuitry-Related Traits in Dsm-V and for Studying Resilience to Warzone-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. .score: 24.0
    The DSM-III, DSM-IV, DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 have judiciously minimized discussion of etiologies to distance clinical psychiatry from Freudian psychoanalysis. With this goal mostly achieved, discussion of etiological factors should be reintroduced into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). A research agenda for the DSM-V advocated the "development of a pathophysiologically based classification system". The author critically reviews the neuroevolutionary literature on stress-induced and fear circuitry disorders and related amygdala-driven, species-atypical fear behaviors of clinical severity in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Crawford L. Elder (2011). Familiar Objects and Their Shadows. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Most contemporary metaphysicians are sceptical about the reality of familiar objects such as dogs and trees, people and desks, cells and stars. They prefer an ontology of the spatially tiny or temporally tiny. Tiny microparticles 'dog-wise arranged' explain the appearance, they say, that there are dogs; microparticles obeying microphysics collectively cause anything that a baseball appears to cause; temporal stages collectively sustain the illusion of enduring objects that persist across changes. Crawford L. Elder argues that all such attempts to 'explain (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). Brentano's Simple Attitudes. In Alex Gzrankowski & Michelle Montague (eds.), Non-Propositional Intentionality. OUP.score: 24.0
    According to what I will refer to as the ‘received view,’ at least some intentional states are propositional attitudes, construed as relations to propositions (§1). The received view faces some extraordinary difficulties (§2). In this paper, I propose that these difficulties may be avoided if we adopt the radically different view of intentional states developed by Franz Brentano. Brentano’s view is different from the received view in two crucial respects. First, according to Brentano every intentional state is an objectual attitude (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000