Search results for 'Aysel Dog˘an' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kristien Hens (2009). Ethical Responsibilities Towards Dogs: An Inquiry Into the Dog–Human Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):3-14.score: 56.0
    The conditions of life of many companion animals and the rate at which they are surrendered to shelters raise many ethical issues. What duties do we have towards the dogs that live in our society? To suggest answers to these questions, I first give four possible ways of looking at the relationship between man and dog: master–slave, employer–worker, parent–child, and friend–friend. I argue that the morally acceptable relationships are of a different kind but bears family resemblances to the latter three. (...)
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  2. W. N. Kellogg, James Deese, N. H. Pronko & M. Feinberg (1947). An Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (2):99.score: 42.0
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  3. P. S. Shurrager (1947). A Comment on 'an Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog.'. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (3):261-263.score: 42.0
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  4. Ignacio Javier Lopez (2003). Film, Freud, and Paranoia: Dali and the Representation of Male Desire in An Andalusian Dog. Diacritics 31 (2):35-48.score: 36.0
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  5. Cynthia Damon (2008). The Mind of an Ass and the Impudence of a Dog': A Scholar Gone Bad. In I. Sluiter & Ralph Mark Rosen (eds.), Kakos: Badness and Anti-Value in Classical Antiquity. Brill. 307--335.score: 36.0
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  6. Daniel C. Dennett (1990). Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):76-77.score: 36.0
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  7. Armond Duwell (2004). How to Teach an Old Dog New Tricks: Quantum Information, Quantum Computing, and the Philosophy of Physics. Dissertation, University of Pittsburghscore: 36.0
     
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  8. Jessica Greenebaum (2009). "I'm Not an Activist!": Animal Rights Vs. Animal Welfare in the Purebred Dog Rescue Movement. Society and Animals 17 (4):289-304.score: 36.0
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  9. P. P. J. (1905). Cerberus, the Dog of Hades: The History of an Idea. By Maurice Bloomfield. Chicago: The Open Court Publishing Company; London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner and Co. 1905. Pp. 41. With Frontispiece. 2s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 19 (08):412-.score: 36.0
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  10. Hilda Kean (2003). An Exploration of the Sculptures of Greyfriars Bobby, Edinburgh, Scotland, and the Brown Dog, Battersea, South London, England. Society and Animals 11 (4):353-373.score: 36.0
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  11. Clinton R. Sanders (2011). Living and Dying with an Ordinary Remarkable Dog A Little Big Life: A Memoir of a Joyful Dog. Society and Animals 19 (1):109-112.score: 36.0
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  12. Aysel Dog˘an (2011). A Defense of Animal Rights. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):473-491.score: 29.0
    I argue that animals have rights in the sense of having valid claims, which might turn out to be actual rights as society advances and new scientific-technological developments facilitate finding alternative ways of satisfying our vital interests without using animals. Animals have a right to life, to liberty in the sense of freedom of movement and communication, to subsistence, to relief from suffering, and to security against attacks on their physical existence. Animals’ interest in living, freedom, subsistence, and security are (...)
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  13. Cathryn Bailey (2009). A Man and a Dog in a Lifeboat: Self-Sacrifice, Animals, and the Limits of Ethical Theory. Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 129-148.score: 21.0
    In discussions of animal ethics, hypothetical scenarios are often used to try to force the clarification of intuitions about the relative value of human and animal life. Tom Regan requests, for example, that we imagine a man and a dog adrift in a lifeboat while Peter Singer explains why the life of one's child ought to be preferred to that of the family dog in the event of a house fire. I argue that such scenarios are not the usefully abstract (...)
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  14. Michael Rescorla (2009). Chrysippus' Dog as a Case Study in Non-Linguistic Cognition. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 52--71.score: 21.0
    I critique an ancient argument for the possibility of non-linguistic deductive inference. The argument, attributed to Chrysippus, describes a dog whose behavior supposedly reflects disjunctive syllogistic reasoning. Drawing on contemporary robotics, I urge that we can equally well explain the dog's behavior by citing probabilistic reasoning over cognitive maps. I then critique various experimentally-based arguments from scientific psychology that echo Chrysippus's anecdotal presentation.
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  15. Ron Chrisley (2008). Painting an Experience: Las Meninas, Consciousness and the Aesthetic Mode. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):40-45.score: 21.0
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
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  16. Michael Tye (2008). The Experience of Emotion: An Intentionalist Theory. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 62:25--50.score: 21.0
    The experience of emotion is a fundamental part of human consciousness. Think, for example, of how different our conscious lives would be without such experiences as joy, anger, fear, disgust, pity, anxiety, and embarrassment. It is uncontroversial that these experiences typically have an intentional content. Anger, for example, is normally directed at someone or something. One may feel angry at one=s stock broker for provid- ing bad advice or angry with the cleaning lady for dropping the vase. But it is (...)
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  17. Ron Chrisley, Painting an Experience.score: 21.0
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
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  18. Crawford L. Elder (2007). On the Phenomenon of “Dog- Wise Arrangement”. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):132-155.score: 21.0
    An influential line of thought in metaphysics holds that where common sense discerns a tree or a dog or a baseball there may be just many microparticles. Provided the microparticles are arranged in the right way -- are “treewise” or “dogwise” or “baseballwise” arranged -- our sensory experiences will be just the same as if a tree or dog or baseball were really there. Therefore whether there really are suchfamiliar objects in the world can be decided only by determining what (...)
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  19. Crawford L. Elder (2007). On the Phenomenon of "Dog-Wise Arrangement". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):132–155.score: 21.0
    An influential line of thought in metaphysics holds that where common sense discerns a tree or a dog or a baseball there may be just many microparticles. Provided the microparticles are arranged in the right way -- are “treewise” or “dogwise” or “baseballwise” arranged -- our sensory experiences will be just the same as if a tree or dog or baseball were really there. Therefore whether there really are suchfamiliar objects in the world can be decided only by determining what (...)
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  20. Kennan Ferguson (2004). I ♥ My Dog. Political Theory 32 (3):373-395.score: 21.0
    Virtually all political theory and ethical systems presuppose the primacy of human beings. Abstract human beings have rights, privileges, legal standing, and-it is said-claims to our sympathy. Many political debates, therefore, center on questions of where these lines are to be drawn. But many humans do not behave this way. People, for example, may expend far more love, time, money, and energy on their pets' well-being than on abstract humans. If the choice is between an operation to save their dog's (...)
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  21. Michael Gary Duncan (2012). The Curious Silence of the Dog and Paul of Tarsus; Revisiting The Argument From Silence. Informal Logic 32 (1):83-97.score: 21.0
    In this essay I propose an interpretative and explanatory structure for the so-called argumentum ex silento, or argument from silence (henceforth referred to as the AFS). To this end, I explore two examples, namely, Sherlock Holmes’s oft-quoted notice of the “curious incident of the dog in the night-time” from Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story “Silver Blaze,” and the historical question of Paul of Tarsus’s silence on biographical details of the historical Jesus. Through these cases, I conclude that the AFS serves (...)
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  22. Rainer Wohlfarth, Bettina Mutschler, Andrea Beetz, Friederike Kreuser & Ulrike Korsten-Reck (2013). Dogs Motivate Obese Children for Physical Activity: Key Elements of a Motivational Theory of Animal-Assisted Interventions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
    Background: There is empirical evidence that the presence of a companion animal can have a positive impact on performance. The available evidence can be viewed in terms of differing hypotheses that attempt to explain the mechanisms behind the positive effects. Little attention has been given to motivation as a potential mode of action with regards to human-animal interactions. First we give an overview of evidence that animals might promote motivation. Second we present a study to examine the effect of a (...)
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  23. Riin Magnus (forthcoming). The Function, Formation and Development of Signs in the Guide Dog Team's Work. Biosemiotics:1-17.score: 21.0
    Relying on interviews and fieldwork observations, the article investigates the choice of signs made by guide dogs and their visually impaired handlers while the team is on the move. It also explores the dependence of the choice of signs on specific functions of communication and examines the changes and development of sign usage throughout the team’s work. A significant part of the team’s communication appears to be related to retaining the communicative situation itself: to the establishment of intrateam contact; to (...)
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  24. Ephraim Nissan (2011). The Dog Ate It. American Journal of Semiotics 27 (1/4):115 - 162.score: 21.0
    Several facets of the “flimsy pretext” archetype “My dog ate my homework” are analysed. We do so by considering textual accounts of events from real life filteredthrough the media, and we resort to formalisms (episodic formulae, Wigmore Charts) to capture some aspects of their gist. We also analyse several gag cartoons,either one-panel or multi-panel, and either as produced by others, or ones authored by this writer for the very purpose of probing into potential uses of the archetype. Sometimes the archetype (...)
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  25. Georges Rey (2014). Innate and Learned: Carey, Mad Dog Nativism, and the Poverty of Stimuli and Analogies (Yet Again). Mind and Language 29 (2):109-132.score: 21.0
    In her recent (2009) book, The Origins of Concepts, Susan Carey argues that what she calls ‘Quinean Bootstrapping’ and processes of analogy in children show that the expressive power of a mind can be increased in ways that refute Jerry Fodor's (1975, 2008) ‘Mad Dog’ view that all concepts are innate. I argue that it is doubtful any evidence about the manifestation of concepts in children will bear upon the logico-semantic issues of expressive power. Analogy and bootstrapping may be ways (...)
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  26. Zsófia Virányi Teresa Schmidjell, Friederike Range, Ludwig Huber (2012). Do Owners Have a Clever Hans Effect on Dogs? Results of a Pointing Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 21.0
    Dogs are exceptionally successful at interpreting human pointing gestures to locate food hidden in one of two containers. However, whether dogs are totally reliant on the pointing gesture itself, or if their success is increased by subtle cues from their human handler has repeatedly been questioned. In two experiments we used a standard two-way object-choice task to focus on this potential Clever Hans effect and investigated if and how owners’ knowledge and beliefs influenced their dogs’ performance. In both experiments, as (...)
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  27. Stan Klein (forthcoming). Autonoesis and Belief in a Personal Past: An Evolutionary Theory of Episodic Memory Indices. Review of Philosophy and Psychology.score: 18.0
    In this paper I discuss philosophical and psychological treatments of the question "how do we decide that an occurrent mental state is a memory and not, say a thought or imagination?" This issue has proven notoriously difficult to resolve, with most proposed indices, criteria and heuristics failing to achieve consensus. Part of the difficulty, I argue, is that the indices and analytic solutions thus far offered seldom have been situated within a well-specified theory of memory function. As I hope to (...)
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  28. Russell Haines, Marc D. Street & Douglas Haines (2008). The Influence of Perceived Importance of an Ethical Issue on Moral Judgment, Moral Obligation, and Moral Intent. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):387 - 399.score: 18.0
    The study extends and tests the issue contingent four-component model of ethical decision-making to include moral obligation. A web-based questionnaire was used to gauge the influence of perceived importance of an ethical issue on moral judgment and moral intent. Perceived importance of an ethical issue was found to be a predictor of moral judgment but not of moral intent as predicted. Moral obligation is suggested to be a process that occurs after a moral judgment is made and explained a significant (...)
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  29. Mehmet Karabela (2013). Between Jadal and Burhān: Reading Post-Classical Islamic Intellectual History Through Ibn Ṭufeyl’s Novel Ḥayy B. Yaḳẓān. JOURNAL OF THE FACULTY OF DIVINITY OF ANKARA UNIVERSITY 54 (2):77-93.score: 18.0
    This article opens a new discussion in the field of post-classical Islamic intellectual history by showing how literature and intellectual history are two inseparable and interdependent fields through an analysis of Ibn Ṭufayl’s novel, Ḥayy b. Yaqẓān. To this end, the article first examines the tension between the two concepts of jadal and burhān, which have affected much of the currents in classical Islamic intellectual history, and does so by assessing the three main figures in Ibn Ṭufayl’s novel: Ḥayy, Absāl (...)
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  30. Nina E. Cohen, Frans W. A. Brom & Elsbeth N. Stassen (2009). Fundamental Moral Attitudes to Animals and Their Role in Judgment: An Empirical Model to Describe Fundamental Moral Attitudes to Animals and Their Role in Judgment on the Culling of Healthy Animals During an Animal Disease Epidemic. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):341-359.score: 18.0
    In this paper, we present and defend the theoretical framework of an empirical model to describe people’s fundamental moral attitudes (FMAs) to animals, the stratification of FMAs in society and the role of FMAs in judgment on the culling of healthy animals in an animal disease epidemic. We used philosophical animal ethics theories to understand the moral basis of FMA convictions. Moreover, these theories provide us with a moral language for communication between animal ethics, FMAs, and public debates. We defend (...)
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  31. Matteo E. Bonfanti (forthcoming). From Sniffer Dogs to Emerging Sniffer Devices for Airport Security: An Opportunity to Rethink Privacy Implications? Science and Engineering Ethics:1-17.score: 18.0
    Dogs are known for their incredible ability to detect odours, extracting them from a “complex” environment and recognising them. This makes sniffer dogs precious assets in a broad variety of security applications. However, their use is subject to some intrinsic restrictions. Dogs can only be trained to a limited set of applications, get tired after a relatively short period, and thus require a high turnover. This has sparked a drive over the past decade to develop artificial sniffer devices—generally known as (...)
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  32. Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (2011). "We Are All Different": Statistical Discrimination and the Right to Be Treated as an Individual. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (1/2):47 - 59.score: 18.0
    There are many objections to statistical discrimination in general and racial profiling in particular. One objection appeals to the idea that people have a right to be treated as individuals. Statistical discrimination violates this right because, presumably, it involves treating people simply on the basis of statistical facts about groups to which they belong while ignoring non-statistical evidence about them. While there is something to this objection—there are objectionable ways of treating others that seem aptly described as failing to treat (...)
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  33. Robert L. Brown, Darren Charters, Sally Gunz & Neil Haddow (2007). Colliding Interests – Age as an Automobile Insurance Rating Variable: Equitable Rate-Making or Unfair Discrimination? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (2):103 - 114.score: 18.0
    Many private business relationships are increasingly characterized by claims that certain actions should not be permitted since particular right claims are involved. Such claims should be taken seriously, but are they always ethically legitimate? This paper analyzes one context, the use of age as a rating variable in the pricing of automobile insurance, where such claims are made. By identifying, evaluating and assessing the relevant basis for the differentiation, actuarial equity, it is concluded that there is an ethical basis for (...)
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  34. Andrea Beetz, Henri Julius, Dennis Turner & Kurt Kotrschal (2012). Effects of Social Support by a Dog on Stress Modulation in Male Children with Insecure Attachment. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Up to 90% of children with special education needs and about 40% of children in the general population show insecure or disorganized attachment patterns, which are linked to a diminished ability to use social support by others for the regulation of stress. The aim of the study was to investigate if children with insecure-avoidant/disorganized attachment can profit more from social support by a dog compared to a friendly human during a stressful task. We investigated 47 male children (age 7-11) with (...)
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  35. Tomas Bagdanskis & Justinas Usonis (2010). Termination of an Employment Contract Upon Unilateral Notice of an Employee in Lithuania. Jurisprudence 119 (1):211-226.score: 18.0
    The theoretical aspects and practical application of the termination of an employment contract upon an employee’s notice are analyzed in the paper. An employee can terminate an employment contract by his/her notice either without specifying any reason or due to some serious reasons. The problems of the regulation of the grounds for the exipiry of an employment contract are discussed and analyzed by comparison with the corresponding regulations in other European countries. Rulings of the Supreme Court of the Republic of (...)
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  36. Sharon R. Ford (2007). An Analysis of Properties in John Heil’s "From an Ontological Point of View&Quot;. In G. Romano & Malatesti (eds.), From an Ontological Point of View, SWIF Philosophy of Mind Review, Symposium. SWIF Philosophy of Mind Review.score: 15.0
    In this paper I argue that the requirement for the qualitative is theory-dependent, determined by the fundamental assumptions built into the ontology. John Heil’s qualitative, in its role as individuator of objects and powers, is required only by a theory that posits a world of distinct objects or powers. Does Heil’s ‘deep’ view of the world, such that there is only one powerful object (e.g. a field containing modes or properties which we perceive as manifest everyday objects) require the qualitative (...)
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  37. Yang Xiao (2011). Holding an Aristotelian Mirror to Confucian Ethics? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (3):359-375.score: 15.0
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  38. Lucinda Woodward, Jennifer Milliken & Sonya Humy (2012). Give a Dog a Bad Name and Hang Him: Evaluating Big, Black Dog Syndrome. Society and Animals 20 (3):236-253.score: 15.0
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  39. Philip Howell (2013). The Dog Fancy at War: Breeds, Breeding, and Britishness, 1914-1918. Society and Animals 21 (6):546-567.score: 15.0
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  40. Robert W. Mitchell & Alan L. Ellis (2013). Cat Person, Dog Person, Gay, or Heterosexual: The Effect of Labels on a Man's Perceived Masculinity, Femininity, and Likability. Society and Animals 21 (1):1-16.score: 15.0
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  41. Ronald B. Jacobson (2007). A Lost Horizon: The Experience of an Other and School Bullying. Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (4):297-317.score: 15.0
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  42. Heike Mildenberger & Saharon Shelah (2011). The Minimal Cofinality of an Ultrapower of Ω and the Cofinality of the Symmetric Groupcan Be Larger Than. Journal of Symbolic Logic 76 (4):1322-1340.score: 15.0
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  43. J. B. Beebe-Center & S. S. Stevens (1938). The Emotional Responses: Changes of Heart-Rate in a Gun-Shy Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (3):239.score: 15.0
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  44. Travis Conner, Jeffrey Lee Rasmussen & Rajecki (2007). Punish and Forgive: Causal Attribution and Positivity Bias in Response to Cat and Dog Misbehavior. Society and Animals 15 (4):311-328.score: 15.0
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  45. An Unfinished Essay-in-Progress (1995). SEX: An American Commentary. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press.score: 15.0
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  46. Dorit Karla Haubenhofer & Sylvia Kirchengast (2007). 'Dog Handlers' and Dogs' Emotional and Cortisol Secretion Responses Associated with Animal-Aassisted Therapy Sessions. Society and Animals 15 (2):127-150.score: 15.0
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  47. Sonya Humy, Jennifer Milliken & Lucinda Woodward (2012). Give a Dog a Bad Name and Hang Him: Evaluating Big, Black Dog Syndrome. Society and Animals 20 (3):236-253.score: 15.0
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  48. Patrick Jackson (2012). Situated Activities in a Dog Park: Identity and Conflict in Human-Animal Space. Society and Animals 20 (3):254-272.score: 15.0
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  49. Tomáš Jakuba, Zuzana Polcová, Denisa Fedáková, Jana Kottferová, Jana Mareková, Magdaléna Fejsáková, Olga Ondrašovičová & Miloslav Ondrašovič (2013). Differences in Evaluation of a Dog's Temperament by Individual Members of the Same Household. Society and Animals 21 (6):582-589.score: 15.0
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