Search results for 'Aysel Dog˘an' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aysel Dog (2011). A Defense of Animal Rights. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):473-491.score: 240.0
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  2. Kristien Hens (2009). Ethical Responsibilities Towards Dogs: An Inquiry Into the Dog–Human Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):3-14.score: 162.7
    The conditions of life of many companion animals and the rate at which they are surrendered to shelters raise many ethical issues. What duties do we have towards the dogs that live in our society? To suggest answers to these questions, I first give four possible ways of looking at the relationship between man and dog: master–slave, employer–worker, parent–child, and friend–friend. I argue that the morally acceptable relationships are of a different kind but bears family resemblances to the latter three. (...)
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  3. W. N. Kellogg, James Deese, N. H. Pronko & M. Feinberg (1947). An Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (2):99.score: 132.0
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  4. P. S. Shurrager (1947). A Comment on 'an Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog.'. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (3):261-263.score: 132.0
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  5. Ignacio Javier Lopez (2003). Film, Freud, and Paranoia: Dali and the Representation of Male Desire in An Andalusian Dog. Diacritics 31 (2):35-48.score: 120.0
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  6. Hilda Kean (2003). An Exploration of the Sculptures of Greyfriars Bobby, Edinburgh, Scotland, and the Brown Dog, Battersea, South London, England. Society and Animals 11 (4):353-373.score: 120.0
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  7. Jessica Greenebaum (2009). "I'm Not an Activist!": Animal Rights Vs. Animal Welfare in the Purebred Dog Rescue Movement. Society and Animals 17 (4):289-304.score: 120.0
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  8. Clinton R. Sanders (2011). Living and Dying with an Ordinary Remarkable Dog A Little Big Life: A Memoir of a Joyful Dog. Society and Animals 19 (1):109-112.score: 120.0
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  9. P. P. J. (1905). Cerberus, the Dog of Hades: The History of an Idea. By Maurice Bloomfield. Chicago: The Open Court Publishing Company; London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner and Co. 1905. Pp. 41. With Frontispiece. 2s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 19 (08):412-.score: 120.0
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  10. Cynthia Damon (2008). The Mind of an Ass and the Impudence of a Dog': A Scholar Gone Bad. In I. Sluiter & Ralph Mark Rosen (eds.), Kakos: Badness and Anti-Value in Classical Antiquity. Brill. 307--335.score: 120.0
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  11. Daniel C. Dennett (1990). Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):76-77.score: 120.0
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  12. Armond Duwell (2004). How to Teach an Old Dog New Tricks: Quantum Information, Quantum Computing, and the Philosophy of Physics. Dissertation, University of Pittsburghscore: 120.0
     
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  13. Aysel Dog˘an (2011). A Defense of Animal Rights. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):473-491.score: 87.0
    I argue that animals have rights in the sense of having valid claims, which might turn out to be actual rights as society advances and new scientific-technological developments facilitate finding alternative ways of satisfying our vital interests without using animals. Animals have a right to life, to liberty in the sense of freedom of movement and communication, to subsistence, to relief from suffering, and to security against attacks on their physical existence. Animals’ interest in living, freedom, subsistence, and security are (...)
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  14. Cathryn Bailey (2009). A Man and a Dog in a Lifeboat: Self-Sacrifice, Animals, and the Limits of Ethical Theory. Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 129-148.score: 54.0
    In discussions of animal ethics, hypothetical scenarios are often used to try to force the clarification of intuitions about the relative value of human and animal life. Tom Regan requests, for example, that we imagine a man and a dog adrift in a lifeboat while Peter Singer explains why the life of one's child ought to be preferred to that of the family dog in the event of a house fire. I argue that such scenarios are not the usefully abstract (...)
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  15. Michael Rescorla (2009). Chrysippus' Dog as a Case Study in Non-Linguistic Cognition. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 52--71.score: 54.0
    I critique an ancient argument for the possibility of non-linguistic deductive inference. The argument, attributed to Chrysippus, describes a dog whose behavior supposedly reflects disjunctive syllogistic reasoning. Drawing on contemporary robotics, I urge that we can equally well explain the dog's behavior by citing probabilistic reasoning over cognitive maps. I then critique various experimentally-based arguments from scientific psychology that echo Chrysippus's anecdotal presentation.
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  16. Ron Chrisley (2008). Painting an Experience: Las Meninas, Consciousness and the Aesthetic Mode. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):40-45.score: 54.0
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
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  17. Michael Tye (2008). The Experience of Emotion: An Intentionalist Theory. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 62:25--50.score: 54.0
    The experience of emotion is a fundamental part of human consciousness. Think, for example, of how different our conscious lives would be without such experiences as joy, anger, fear, disgust, pity, anxiety, and embarrassment. It is uncontroversial that these experiences typically have an intentional content. Anger, for example, is normally directed at someone or something. One may feel angry at one=s stock broker for provid- ing bad advice or angry with the cleaning lady for dropping the vase. But it is (...)
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  18. Ron Chrisley, Painting an Experience.score: 54.0
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
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  19. Crawford L. Elder (2007). On the Phenomenon of "Dog-Wise Arrangement". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):132–155.score: 54.0
    An influential line of thought in metaphysics holds that where common sense discerns a tree or a dog or a baseball there may be just many microparticles. Provided the microparticles are arranged in the right way -- are “treewise” or “dogwise” or “baseballwise” arranged -- our sensory experiences will be just the same as if a tree or dog or baseball were really there. Therefore whether there really are suchfamiliar objects in the world can be decided only by determining what (...)
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  20. Michael Gary Duncan (2012). The Curious Silence of the Dog and Paul of Tarsus; Revisiting The Argument From Silence. Informal Logic 32 (1):83-97.score: 54.0
    In this essay I propose an interpretative and explanatory structure for the so-called argumentum ex silento, or argument from silence (henceforth referred to as the AFS). To this end, I explore two examples, namely, Sherlock Holmes’s oft-quoted notice of the “curious incident of the dog in the night-time” from Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story “Silver Blaze,” and the historical question of Paul of Tarsus’s silence on biographical details of the historical Jesus. Through these cases, I conclude that the AFS serves (...)
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  21. Crawford L. Elder (2007). On the Phenomenon of “Dog- Wise Arrangement”. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):132-155.score: 54.0
    An influential line of thought in metaphysics holds that where common sense discerns a tree or a dog or a baseball there may be just many microparticles. Provided the microparticles are arranged in the right way -- are “treewise” or “dogwise” or “baseballwise” arranged -- our sensory experiences will be just the same as if a tree or dog or baseball were really there. Therefore whether there really are suchfamiliar objects in the world can be decided only by determining what (...)
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  22. Kennan Ferguson (2004). I ♥ My Dog. Political Theory 32 (3):373-395.score: 54.0
    Virtually all political theory and ethical systems presuppose the primacy of human beings. Abstract human beings have rights, privileges, legal standing, and-it is said-claims to our sympathy. Many political debates, therefore, center on questions of where these lines are to be drawn. But many humans do not behave this way. People, for example, may expend far more love, time, money, and energy on their pets' well-being than on abstract humans. If the choice is between an operation to save their dog's (...)
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  23. Riin Magnus (forthcoming). The Function, Formation and Development of Signs in the Guide Dog Team's Work. Biosemiotics:1-17.score: 54.0
    Relying on interviews and fieldwork observations, the article investigates the choice of signs made by guide dogs and their visually impaired handlers while the team is on the move. It also explores the dependence of the choice of signs on specific functions of communication and examines the changes and development of sign usage throughout the team’s work. A significant part of the team’s communication appears to be related to retaining the communicative situation itself: to the establishment of intrateam contact; to (...)
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  24. Ephraim Nissan (2011). The Dog Ate It. American Journal of Semiotics 27 (1/4):115 - 162.score: 54.0
    Several facets of the “flimsy pretext” archetype “My dog ate my homework” are analysed. We do so by considering textual accounts of events from real life filteredthrough the media, and we resort to formalisms (episodic formulae, Wigmore Charts) to capture some aspects of their gist. We also analyse several gag cartoons,either one-panel or multi-panel, and either as produced by others, or ones authored by this writer for the very purpose of probing into potential uses of the archetype. Sometimes the archetype (...)
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  25. Georges Rey (2014). Innate and Learned: Carey, Mad Dog Nativism, and the Poverty of Stimuli and Analogies (Yet Again). Mind and Language 29 (2):109-132.score: 54.0
    In her recent (2009) book, The Origins of Concepts, Susan Carey argues that what she calls ‘Quinean Bootstrapping’ and processes of analogy in children show that the expressive power of a mind can be increased in ways that refute Jerry Fodor's (1975, 2008) ‘Mad Dog’ view that all concepts are innate. I argue that it is doubtful any evidence about the manifestation of concepts in children will bear upon the logico-semantic issues of expressive power. Analogy and bootstrapping may be ways (...)
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  26. Matteo E. Bonfanti (2014). From Sniffer Dogs to Emerging Sniffer Devices for Airport Security: An Opportunity to Rethink Privacy Implications? Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):791-807.score: 52.0
    Dogs are known for their incredible ability to detect odours, extracting them from a “complex” environment and recognising them. This makes sniffer dogs precious assets in a broad variety of security applications. However, their use is subject to some intrinsic restrictions. Dogs can only be trained to a limited set of applications, get tired after a relatively short period, and thus require a high turnover. This has sparked a drive over the past decade to develop artificial sniffer devices—generally known as (...)
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  27. Zsófia Virányi Teresa Schmidjell, Friederike Range, Ludwig Huber (2012). Do Owners Have a Clever Hans Effect on Dogs? Results of a Pointing Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 46.0
    Dogs are exceptionally successful at interpreting human pointing gestures to locate food hidden in one of two containers. However, whether dogs are totally reliant on the pointing gesture itself, or if their success is increased by subtle cues from their human handler has repeatedly been questioned. In two experiments we used a standard two-way object-choice task to focus on this potential Clever Hans effect and investigated if and how owners’ knowledge and beliefs influenced their dogs’ performance. In both experiments, as (...)
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  28. Rainer Wohlfarth, Bettina Mutschler, Andrea Beetz, Friederike Kreuser & Ulrike Korsten-Reck (2013). Dogs Motivate Obese Children for Physical Activity: Key Elements of a Motivational Theory of Animal-Assisted Interventions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 46.0
    Background: There is empirical evidence that the presence of a companion animal can have a positive impact on performance. The available evidence can be viewed in terms of differing hypotheses that attempt to explain the mechanisms behind the positive effects. Little attention has been given to motivation as a potential mode of action with regards to human-animal interactions. First we give an overview of evidence that animals might promote motivation. Second we present a study to examine the effect of a (...)
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  29. A. V. Campbell (2009). Mad Dogs and (Arguably) Madder Scotsmen: Biomedical Ethics in an Asian Context. Clinical Ethics 4 (2):57-58.score: 40.0
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  30. Ronnie Lippens (2013). A Note on Electric Dogs, by Way of an Introduction to Foucault, Semiotics and (the Biopolitics of) Justice. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (1):1-4.score: 40.0
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  31. Carol M. Corkran (forthcoming). “An Extension of Me”: Handlers Describe Their Experiences of Working with Bird Dogs. Society and Animals:1-18.score: 40.0
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  32. Frederick B. Churchill (2005). Recent Works in the History and Philosophy of Science Have Explored Anew the Possible Connection Between Science and Ethics. 1 They Follow a Well-Established Tradition That has Dogged Modern Science Since David Hume Questioned Whether a Moral Claim (Ie, an ''Ought'') Might Be Derived From a Factual Claim (Ie, an ''Is''). In the Post-Darwin Period, as Biologists Wrestled with Explanations for Evolution, Evo-Lutionary Ethics Became a Major Issue for Promoters of Species Descent. TH Huxley and Herbert ... [REVIEW] In Noretta Koertge (ed.), Scientific Values and Civic Virtues. Oup Usa. 135.score: 40.0
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  33. Thomas M. Gehring, Kurt C. VerCauteren & Jean-Marc Landry (2010). Livestock Protection Dogs in the 21st Century: Is an Ancient Tool Relevant to Modern Conservation Challenges? Bioscience 60 (4):299-308.score: 40.0
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  34. Cordelia Fine (2006). Is the Emotional Dog Wagging its Rational Tail, or Chasing It? Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):83 – 98.score: 36.0
    According to Haidt's (2001) social intuitionist model (SIM), an individual's moral judgment normally arises from automatic 'moral intuitions'. Private moral reasoning - when it occurs - is biased and post hoc, serving to justify the moral judgment determined by the individual's intuitions. It is argued here, however, that moral reasoning is not inevitably subserviant to moral intuitions in the formation of moral judgments. Social cognitive research shows that moral reasoning may sometimes disrupt the automatic process of judgment formation described by (...)
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  35. Richard B. Miller (1989). Dog Bites Man: A Defence of Modal Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (4):476 – 478.score: 36.0
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  36. Theodore R. Marmor, Kieke G. H. Okma & Joseph R. Rojas (2007). What It is, What It Does and What It Might Do: A Review of Michael Moore's Sicko, 113 Minutes, Dog Eat Dog Films, USA, 2007. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (10):49 – 51.score: 36.0
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  37. A. Cohen (2005). More Than Bare Existence: An Implicature of Existential Bare Plurals. Journal of Semantics 22 (4):389-400.score: 36.0
    Existential bare plurals (e.g. dogs) have the same semantics as explicit existentials (e.g. a dog or some dogs) but different pragmatics. In addition to entailing the existence of a set of individuals, existential bare plurals implicate that this set is suitable for some purpose. The suitability implicature is a form of what has been variously called informativeness-based or R-based implicature. Condoravdi (1992, 1994) and others have claimed that bare plurals have a third reading (in addition to the generic and the (...)
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  38. Sarah Jackson (2011). Touching Freud's Dog. Angelaki 15 (2):187-201.score: 36.0
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  39. Brian Locke (1998). “Top Dog,” “Black Threat,” and “Japanese Cats”: The Impact of the White-Black Binary on Asian-American Identity. Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):98-125.score: 36.0
    This essay is a reading of two Hollywood films: The Defiant Ones (1958, directed by Stanley Kramer, starring Tony Curtis and Sidney Poitier) and Rising Sun (1993, directed by Philip Kauffman starring Wesley Snipes and Sean Connery, based on the Michael Crichton novel of the same name). The essay argues that these films work to contain black demand for social and political equality not through exclusionary measures, but rather through deliberate acknowledgment of blackness as integral to US identity. My reading (...)
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  40. Peter Duff (1998). The Measure of Criminal Injuries Compensation: Political Pragmatism or Dog's Dinner? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 18 (1):105-142.score: 36.0
    The theoretical basis of criminal injuries compensation schemes is vague and, hence, the level at which awards should be set is unclear. Until recently, awards under the British Scheme were pegged at the level of common law damages but there now exists a ‘tariff’ system which sets out a standard award for each type of injury regardless of the recipient's individual losses. Up until now, it has been fairly clear that an award of compensation represents, in concrete form, an expression (...)
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  41. Daryn Lehoux (2012). What Did the Romans Know?: An Inquiry Into Science and Worldmaking. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    Lehoux contends that even though many of the Romans' views about the natural world have no place in modern science--the umbrella-footed monsters and dog-headed people that roamed the earth and the stars that foretold human destinies--their ...
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  42. Richard Smith (2011). On Dogs and Children: Judgements in the Realm of Meaning. Ethics and Education 6 (2):171-180.score: 34.0
    When we say that good parenting is an ethical and not a technical matter, what is the nature of the warrant we can give for identifying one way of parenting as good and another as bad? There is, of course, a general issue here about the giving of reasons in ethics. The issue may seem to arise with peculiar force in parenting since parenting casts our whole being into uncertainty: here, above all, it seems, we do not scrutinise our commitments (...)
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  43. David McFarland (2008). Guilty Robots, Happy Dogs: The Question of Alien Minds. OUP Oxford.score: 34.0
    When we interact with animals, we intuitively read thoughts and feelings into their expressions and actions - it is easy to suppose that they have minds like ours. And as technology grows more sophisticated, we might soon find ourselves interpreting the behaviour of robots too in human terms. -/- It is natural for us to humanize other beings in this way, but is it philosophically or scientifically justifiable? How different might the minds of animals or machines be to ours? As (...)
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  44. Colin Radford (1970). Hoping, Wishing, and Dogs. Inquiry 13 (1-4):100 – 103.score: 34.0
    Although dogs are almost totally incapable of symbolic behaviour, they can hope, for a dog's behaviour can manifest not only a desire for something but varying degrees of expectation that it will get what it desires; but since they are almost totally incapable of symbolic behaviour, nothing they do can indicate that they both desire something and yet are certain that they will not get it. So the suggestion that dogs entertain idle wishes is, apparently, vacuous, i.e. untestable, or nonsensical. (...)
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  45. Günther Rohdenburg (1985). Dogs, Bitches and Other Creatures. Journal of Semantics 4 (2):117-135.score: 34.0
    ABSTRACTIn an attempt to uphold a specific constraint on sentential ambiguity Kempson (1980) has proposed an elaborate framework for dealing with the semantic duality of items such as dog. Her analysis culminates in a duality principle relating the specific and the general interpretation of the terms in question. These proposals are shown to have a number of serious shortcomings. First, they do not allow for the fact that the two relevant interpretations may vary in strength, and that independently of each (...)
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  46. Jessica Pierce (2012). The Last Walk: Reflections on Our Pets at the End of Their Lives. The University of Chicago Press.score: 28.0
    Drawing on the moving story of the last year of the life of her own treasured dog, Ody, she presents an in-depth exploration of the practical, medical, and moral issues that trouble pet owners confronted with the decline and death of their ...
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  47. H. Dog˘an & M. Deg˘Er (2001). Case Study,Informed Consent, Surrogate Decision Makers, Conflict of Autonomy and the Paternalistic Approach: A Case Report From Turkey. Nursing Ethics 8 (6):556-561.score: 28.0
  48. Stan Klein (forthcoming). Autonoesis and Belief in a Personal Past: An Evolutionary Theory of Episodic Memory Indices. Review of Philosophy and Psychology.score: 24.0
    In this paper I discuss philosophical and psychological treatments of the question "how do we decide that an occurrent mental state is a memory and not, say a thought or imagination?" This issue has proven notoriously difficult to resolve, with most proposed indices, criteria and heuristics failing to achieve consensus. Part of the difficulty, I argue, is that the indices and analytic solutions thus far offered seldom have been situated within a well-specified theory of memory function. As I hope to (...)
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  49. Parker Crutchfield (2011). Representing High-Level Properties in Perceptual Experience. Philosophical Psychology 25 (2):279 - 294.score: 24.0
    High-level theory is the view that high-level properties?the property of being a dog, being a tiger, being an apple, being a pair of lips, etc.?can be represented in perceptual experience. Low-level theory denies this and claims that high-level properties are only represented at the level of perceptual judgment and are products of cognitive interpretation of low-level sensory information (color, shape, illumination). This paper discusses previous attempts to establish high-level theory, their weaknesses, and an argument for high-level theory that does not (...)
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  50. Mark Rowlands, Animals That Act for Moral Reasons.score: 24.0
    Non-human animals (henceforth, “animals”) are typically regarded as moral patients rather than moral agents. Let us define these terms as follows: 1) X is a moral patient if and only if X is a legitimate object of moral concern: that is, roughly, X is something whose interests should be taken into account when decisions are made concerning it or which otherwise impact on it. 2) X is a moral agent if and only if X can be morally evaluated–praised or blamed (...)
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