Search results for 'B-theory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephan Torre (2009). Truth-Conditions, Truth-Bearers and the New B-Theory of Time. Philosophical Studies 142 (3):325-344.score: 180.0
    In this paper I consider two strategies for providing tenseless truth-conditions for tensed sentences: the token-reflexive theory and the date theory. Both theories have faced a number of objections by prominent A-theorists such as Quentin Smith and William Lane Craig. Traditionally, these two theories have been viewed as rival methods for providing truth-conditions for tensed sentences. I argue that the debate over whether the token-reflexive theory or the date theory is true has arisen from a failure to distinguish between conditions (...)
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  2. Daniel M. Johnson (2013). B-Theory Old and New: On Ontological Commitment. Synthese 190 (17):3953-3970.score: 180.0
    The most important argument against the B-theory of time is the paraphrase argument. The major defense against that argument is the “new” tenseless theory of time, which is built on what I will call the “indexical reply” to the paraphrase argument. The move from the “old” tenseless theory of time to the new is most centrally a change of viewpoint about the nature and determiners of ontological commitment. Ironically, though, the new tenseless theorists have generally not paid enough sustained, (...)
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  3. Francesco Orilia & L. Nathan Oaklander (2013). Do We Really Need a New B-Theory of Time? Topoi:1-14.score: 180.0
    It is customary in current philosophy of time to distinguish between an A- (or tensed) and a B- (or tenseless) theory of time. It is also customary to distinguish between an old B-theory of time, and a new B-theory of time. We may say that the former holds both semantic atensionalism and ontological atensionalism, whereas the latter gives up semantic atensionalism and retains ontological atensionalism. It is typically assumed that the B-theorists have been induced by advances in the (...)
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  4. Natalja Deng (2013). Our Experience of Passage on the B-Theory. Erkenntnis 78 (4):713-726.score: 120.0
    Elsewhere I have suggested that the B-theory includes a notion of passage, by virtue of including succession. Here, I provide further support for that claim by showing that uncontroversial elements of the B-theory straightforwardly ground a veridical sense of passage. First, I argue that the B-theory predicts that subjects of experience have a sense of passivity with respect to time that they do not have with respect to space, which they are right to have, even according to (...)
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  5. Alexander Pruss, B-Theory, Language and Ethics.score: 120.0
    The A-theory of time states that there is an absolute fact of the matter about what events are, respectively, in the past, present and future. The B-theory says that all there is to temporality are the relations of earlier-than, later-than and simultaneous-with, and the past, present and future are merely relative.
     
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  6. Mikel Burley (2008). The B-Theory of Time and the Fear of Death. Polish Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):21-38.score: 120.0
    This paper discusses Robin Le Poidevin’s proposal that a commitment to the B-theory of time provides a reason to relinquish the fear of death. After outlining Le Poidevin’s views on time and death, I analyze the specific passages in which he makes his proposal, giving close attention to the claim that, for the B-theorist, one’s life is “eternally real.” I distinguish two possible interpretations of this claim, which I call alethic eternalism and ontic eternalism respectively, and argue, with reference (...)
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  7. Tobias Hansson Wahlberg (2009). Objects in Time: Studies of Persistence in B-Time. Dissertation, Lund Universityscore: 108.0
    This thesis is about the conceptualization of persistence of physical, middle-sized objects within the theoretical framework of the revisionary ‘B-theory’ of time. According to the B-theory, time does not flow, but is an extended and inherently directed fourth dimension along which the history of the universe is ‘laid out’ once and for all. It is a widespread view among philosophers that if we accept the B-theory, the commonsensical ‘endurance theory’ of persistence will have to be rejected. The (...)
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  8. Natalja Deng (2010). 'Beyond A- and B-Time' Reconsidered. Philosophia 38 (4):741-753.score: 108.0
    This article is a response to Clifford Williams’s claim that the debate between A- and B theories of time is misconceived because these theories do not differ. I provide some missing support for Williams’s claim that the B-theory includes transition, by arguing that representative B-theoretic explanations for why we experience time as passing (even though it does not) are inherently unstable. I then argue that, contra Williams, it does not follow that there is nothing at stake in the A- (...)
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  9. Nicholas J. J. Smith (2011). Inconsistency in the A-Theory. Philosophical Studies 156 (2):231 - 247.score: 108.0
    This paper presents a new argument against A-theories of time. A-theorists hold that there is an objective now (present moment) and an objective flow of time, the latter constituted by the movement of the objective now through time. A-theorists therefore want to draw different pictures of reality—showing the objective now in different positions—depending upon the time at which the picture is drawn. In this paper it is argued that the times at which the different pictures are drawn may be taken (...)
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  10. Mikel Burley (2006). Beyond “Beyond a- and B-Time”. Philosophia 34 (4):411-416.score: 108.0
    This Article critically discusses Clifford Williams’ claim that the A-theory and B-theory of time are indistinguishable. I examine three considerations adduced by Williams to support his claim that the concept of time essentially includes transition as well as extension, and argue that, despite its prima facie plausibility, the claim has not been adequately justified. Williams therefore begs the question against the B-theorist, who denies that transition is essential. By Williams’ own lights, he ought to deny that the B-theory (...)
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  11. Jonathan Tallant (2008). What is It to “B” a Relation? Synthese 162 (1):117 - 132.score: 108.0
    The purpose of this paper is two fold: first, I look to show Oaklander’s (The ontology of time. New York: Prometheus Books, 2004) theory of time to be false. Second, I show that the only way to salvage the B-theory is via the adopting of the causal theory of time, and allying this to Oaklander’s claim that tense is to be eliminated. I then raise some concerns with the causal theory of time. My conclusion is that, if one adopts (...)
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  12. Simon Prosser (2000). A New Problem for the a-Theory of Time. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (201):494-498.score: 108.0
    : I offer a new approach to the increasingly convoluted debate between the A- and B-theories of time, the ‘tensed’ and ‘tenseless’ theories. It is often assumed that the B-theory faces more difficulties than the A-theory in explaining the apparently tensed features of temporal experience. I argue that the A-theory cannot explain these features at all, because on any physicalist or supervenience theory of the mind, in which the nature of experience is fixed by the physical state of the (...)
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  13. Josh Parsons (2002). A-Theory for B-Theorists. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):1-20.score: 102.0
    The debate between A-theory and B-theory in the philosophy of time is a persistent one. It is not always clear, however, what the terms of this debate are. A-theorists are often lumped with a miscellaneous collection of heterodox doctrines: the view that only the present exists, that time flows relentlessly, or that presentness is a property (Williams 1996); that time passes, tense is unanalysable, or that earlier than and later than are defined in terms of pastness, presentness, and futurity (...)
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  14. Dirck Vorenkamp (1995). B-Series Temporal Order in Dōgen's Theory of Time. Philosophy East and West 45 (3):387-408.score: 102.0
    Dōgen's views of time are descriptively compared to the modern western philosophical view called "B-theory" and found to contain elements of each of the four main tenets of the B-theory. Furthermore, a fundamental incongruency is discovered. Even accounting for traditional Buddhist approaches to apparent contradictions, Dōgen's problems in this regard call into question the assumption of consistency that has characterized modern interpretations of his views on time.
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  15. Michelle Beer (2007). A Defense of the Co-Reporting Theory of Tensed and Tenseless Essences. Philo 10 (1):59-65.score: 102.0
    The co-reporting theory holds that for every A-sentence-token there is a B-sentence that differs in sense but reports the same event orstate of affairs. Thus, if it is now t7, what is reported by now tokening “It is t7 now” is identical with what is reported by tokening “It is t7 at t7.” Quentin Smith has argued that the fact that the sentence-tokens differ in sense but are co-reporting is compatible with the A-theory supposition that their difference in sense consists (...)
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  16. Dean W. Zimmerman (2005). The A-Theory of Time, the B-Theory of Time, and 'Taking Tense Seriously'. Dialectica 59 (4):401–457.score: 96.0
    The paper has two parts: First, I describe a relatively popular thesis in the philosophy of propositional attitudes, worthy of the name “taking tense seriously”; and I distinguish it from a family of views in the metaphysics of time, namely, the A-theories (or what are sometimes called “tensed theories of time”). Once the distinction is in focus, a skeptical worry arises. Some A-theorists maintain that the difference between past, present, and future, is to be drawn in terms of what exists: (...)
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  17. Nigel J. T. Thomas (1989). Experience and Theory as Determinants of Attitudes Toward Mental Representation: The Case of Knight Dunlap and the Vanishing Images of J.B. Watson. .score: 96.0
    Galton and subsequent investigators find wide divergences in people's subjective reports of mental imagery. Such individual differences might be taken to explain the peculiarly irreconcilable disputes over the nature and cognitive significance of imagery which have periodically broken out among psychologists and philosophers. However, to so explain these disputes is itself to take a substantive and questionable position on the cognitive role of imagery. This article distinguishes three separable issues over which people can be "for" or "against" mental images. Conflation (...)
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  18. Carol Rausch Albright (2010). James B. Ashbrook and His Holistic World: Toward a "Unified Field Theory" of Mind, Brain, Self, World, and God. Zygon 45 (2):479-489.score: 96.0
    James B. Ashbrook's "new natural theology in an empirical mode" pursued an integrated understanding of the spiritual, psychological, and neurological dimensions of spiritual life. Knowledge of neuroscience and personality theory was central to his quest, and his understandings were necessarily revised and amplified as scientific findings emerged. As a result, Ashbrook's legacy may serve as a case example of how to do religion-and-science in a milieu of scientific change. The constant in the quest was Ashbrook's core belief in the basic (...)
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  19. Marion Vorms (2012). A-Not-B Errors: Testing the Limits of Natural Pedagogy Theory. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (4):525-545.score: 96.0
    Gergely and Csibra's theory, known as "natural pedagogy theory", is meant to explain how infants fast-learn generic knowledge from adults. In this paper, my goal is to assess the explanatory import of this theory in a particular case, namely the phenomena known as "A-not-B errors". I first propose a clarification of natural pedagogy theory's fundamental hypotheses. Then, I describe Topál et al.'s (Science, 321, 1831-1834, 2008) experiments, which consist in applying natural pedagogy theory's framework to the A-not-B errors. Finally, I (...)
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  20. William M. Kallfelz (2009). A Response to G.B. Bagci's “Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber Collapse Theory and Whiteheadian Process Philosophy”. Process Studies 38 (2):394-411.score: 96.0
    I examine G.B. Bagci’s arguments for the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) interpretation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics as ideally suited for Whitehead’s philosophy. Much of Bagci’s claims are in response to Michael Epperson, who argues in the same vein in favor of decoherence accounts (Omnès; Zureck). Pace Epperson, I do not think that decoherence is the final arbiter here, and instead I contrast GRW with several other accounts addressing foundational problems of quantum theory (Finkelstein; Green; Peres and Terno; etc.), which also account for (...)
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  21. Michelle Beer (2010). Tense and Truth Conditions. Philosophia 38 (2):265-269.score: 90.0
    The B-theory of time holds that McTaggart’s A-series of past, present, and future is reducible to the B-series of events running from earlier to later. According to the date-theory—originally put forth by J.J.C. Smart and later endorsed by by D.H. Mellor—the truth conditions of tensed or Asentence-tokens can be given in terms of tenseless or B-sentences and, therefore, A-sentence-tokens do not ascribe any A-determinations of pastness, presentness, or futurity. However, as Nathan Oaklander has argued, the date-theory does not provide (...)
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  22. Joseph Diekemper (2007). B-Theory, Fixity, and Fatalism. Noûs 41 (3):429–452.score: 90.0
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  23. Heather Dyke (2003). Tensed Meaning: A Tenseless Account. Journal of Philosophical Research 28:65-81.score: 90.0
    If, as the new B-theory of time maintains, tensed sentences have tenseness truth conditions, it follows that it is possible for two sentence-tokens to have the same truth conditions but different meanings. This conclusion forces a rethink of the traditional identification of truth-conditions with meaning. There is an aspect of the meanings of tensed sentences that is not captured by their truth conditions, and that has so far eluded explanation. In this paper I intend to locate, examine, and explain (...)
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  24. Heather Dyke (2003). Temporal Language and Temporal Reality. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (212):380–391.score: 90.0
    In response to a recent challenge that the New B-theory of Time argues invalidly from the claim that tensed sentences have tenseless truth conditions to the conclusion that temporal reality is tenseless, I argue that while early B-theorists may have relied on some such inference, New B-theorists do not. Giving tenseless truth conditions for tensed sentences is not intended to prove that temporal reality is tenseless. Rather, it is intended to undermine the A-theorist’s move from claims about the irreducibility (...)
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  25. Tobias Hansson (2007). The Problem(s) of Change Revisited. Dialectica 61 (2):265–274.score: 90.0
    Two recurrent arguments levelled against the view that enduring objects survive change are examined within the framework of the B-theory of time: the argument from Leibniz's Law and the argument from Instantiation of Incompatible Properties. Both arguments are shown to be question-begging and hence unsuccessful.
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  26. William Lane Craig (1996). The New B-Theory's Tu Quoque Argument. Synthese 107 (2):249 - 269.score: 90.0
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  27. William Lane Craig (1996). Tense and the New B-Theory of Language. Philosophy 71 (275):5 - 26.score: 90.0
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  28. Robert Francescotti (2008). Endurance and Discernibility. Metaphysica 9 (2):193-204.score: 90.0
    How can an object remain the same, numerically identical, while undergoing change? This is a worry for endurantists, who hold that for any stages, x and y, of a persisting object, x is numerically identical with y. Endurantists might try to avoid the problem of change by insisting that all properties are temporally anchored. It is argued here that while this strategy helps in many cases, it does not help in all. A type of case is presented in which a (...)
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  29. Akiko M. Frischhut (2013). What Experience Cannot Teach Us About Time. Topoi:1-13.score: 90.0
    Does the A-theory have an intuitive advantage over the B-theory? Many A-theorists have claimed so, arguing that their theory has a much better explanation for the fact that we all experience the passage of time: we experience time as passing because time really does pass. In this paper I expose and reject the argument behind the A-theorist’s claim. I argue that all parties have conceded far too easily that there is an experience that needs explaining in the first place. (...)
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  30. Michelle Beer (2008). Prior's' Thank Goodness That's Over'Objection to the B-Theory. In L. Nathan Oaklander (ed.), The Philosophy of Time. Routledge.score: 90.0
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  31. William Lane Craig (1996). Tense and the New B-Theory Of. Philosophy 71:5.score: 90.0
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  32. M. Joshua Mozersky (forthcoming). The B-Theory in the 20th Century. In Adrian Bardon & Heather Dyke (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Time. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 90.0
  33. L. Nathan Oaklander (2008). Two Versions B-Theory Of. In , The Philosophy of Time. Routledge. 1--398.score: 90.0
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  34. Tobias Hansson Wahlberg (2009). Endurance Per Se in B-Time. Metaphysica 10 (2):175-183.score: 84.0
    Three arguments for the conclusion that objects cannot endure in B-time even if they remain intrinsically unchanged are examined: Carter and Hestevolds enduring-objects-as-universals argument (American Philosophical Quarterly 31(4):269-283, 1994) and Barker and Dowe's paradox 1 and paradox 2 (Analysis 63(2):106-114, 2003, Analysis 65(1):69-74, 2005). All three are shown to fail.
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  35. Dean Zimmerman (2008). The Privileged Present : Defending an "a-Theory" of Time. In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell Pub.. 211--225.score: 78.0
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  36. R. Omnes (2003). Consistent Quantum Theory - Robert B. Griffiths, Cambridge, 2001, Pp. 400, US $95, ISBN 0521803497. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (2):329-331.score: 78.0
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  37. David Bohm (1973). Quantum Theory as an Indication of a New Order in Physics. B. Implicate and Explicate Order in Physical Law. Foundations of Physics 3 (2):139-168.score: 78.0
    In this paper, we inquire further into the question of the emergence of new orders in physics, first raised in an earlier paper. In this inquiry, we are led to suggest that the quantum theory indicates the need for yet another new order, which we call “enfolded” or “implicate.” One of the most striking examples of the implicate order is to be seen by considering the function of the hologram, which clearly reveals how a total content (in principle extending over (...)
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  38. Lindsay R. Craig (2010). Gerd B. Müller and Massimo Pigliucci—Extended Synthesis: Theory Expansion or Alternative? Biological Theory 5 (4):395-396.score: 78.0
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  39. H. S. Kariel (1992). Books in Review: The Idea of Political Theory: Reflections on the Self in Political Time and Space by Tracy B. Strong. [REVIEW] Political Theory 20 (2):345-348.score: 78.0
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  40. Christopher Hughes (1999). Bundle Theory From a to B. Mind 108 (429):149-156.score: 72.0
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  41. R. Collins (1998). Book Reviews : J. B. Thompson, The Media and Modernity. A Social Theory of the Media. Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 1996. Pp. 336. Cloth, $49.50; Paper, $16.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (1):152-155.score: 72.0
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  42. Bertram Morris (1965). Possessive Individualism and Political Realities:The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism: Hobbes to Locke C. B. MacPherson. Ethics 75 (3):207-.score: 72.0
  43. Gilbert Harman (1982). Critical Review: Richard B. Brandt, a Theory of the Good and the Right. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 42 (1):119 - 139.score: 72.0
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  44. Steven D. Smith (2011). Porter , Jean . Ministers of the Law: A Natural Law Theory of Legal Authority . Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2010. Pp. Xvi+351. $30.00 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (1):203-207.score: 72.0
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  45. Miklavž Vospernik (2004). Measurement and the Verificationist Theory/Observation Distinction. Acta Analytica 19 (33):95-117.score: 72.0
    In the following article, we propose to show that following the general verificationist epistemic programme (its demand that the truth of our judgments be verifiable), the analysis of measurement on the one hand, and the classical positivist analysis of common-sense observation on the other, do not lead to same conclusions. This is especially important, because the differences in conclusions concern the positivist theory/observation distinction. In particular, the analysis of measurement does not fully support this distinction. This fact might have important (...)
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  46. Clare Beghtol (2008). From the Universe of Knowledge to the Universe of Concepts: The Structural Revolution in Classification for Information Retrieval. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 18 (2):131-144.score: 72.0
    During the twentieth century, bibliographic classification theory underwent a structural revolution. The first modern bibliographic classifications were top-down systems that started at the universe of knowledge and subdivided that universe downward to minute subclasses. After the invention of faceted classification by S.R. Ranganathan, the ideal was to build bottom-up classifications that started with the universe of concepts and built upward to larger and larger faceted classes. This ideal has not been achieved, and the two kinds of classification systems are not (...)
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  47. William A. Rottschaefer (1982). Psychological Foundations of Value Theory: B. F. Skinners Science of Values. Zygon 17 (3):293-301.score: 72.0
  48. C. Hughes (1999). Discussion. Bundle Theory From a to B. Mind 108 (429):149-156.score: 72.0
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  49. G. C. Field (1929). Greek Philosophy Before Plato. By Robert Scoon B.A., Ph.D., (Princeton University Press; and London: Humphrey Milford. 1928. Pp. Viii+353. Price 3 Dollars 50; 16s.)Plato's Theory of Ethics. By R. C. Lodge. (London: Kegan Paul, French, Trübner & Co., Ltd. 1928. Pp. Xiv + 558. Price 21s.)The Hippias Major, Attributed to Plato. Edited, with Introductory Essay and Commentary, by Dorothy Tarrant M.A., (Cambridge University Press. 1928. Pp. Lxxxiv + 104. Price 12s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 4 (13):117-.score: 72.0
  50. Eric Schliesser (2009). Neil McArthur, David Hume's Political Theory: Law, Commerce, and the Constitution of Government, Toronto: University of Toronto Press. 2007. 208pp. H/B. CDN$45. ISBN 978-0-8020-9335-. [REVIEW] Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):103-107.score: 72.0
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