Search results for 'B-theory of Time' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Francesco Orilia & L. Nathan Oaklander (2013). Do We Really Need a New B-Theory of Time? Topoi:1-14.score: 1452.0
    It is customary in current philosophy of time to distinguish between an A- (or tensed) and a B- (or tenseless) theory of time. It is also customary to distinguish between an old B-theory of time, and a new B-theory of time. We may say that the former holds both semantic atensionalism and ontological atensionalism, whereas the latter gives up semantic atensionalism and retains ontological atensionalism. It is typically assumed that the B-theorists have been induced (...)
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  2. Stephan Torre (2009). Truth-Conditions, Truth-Bearers and the New B-Theory of Time. Philosophical Studies 142 (3):325-344.score: 1362.0
    In this paper I consider two strategies for providing tenseless truth-conditions for tensed sentences: the token-reflexive theory and the date theory. Both theories have faced a number of objections by prominent A-theorists such as Quentin Smith and William Lane Craig. Traditionally, these two theories have been viewed as rival methods for providing truth-conditions for tensed sentences. I argue that the debate over whether the token-reflexive theory or the date theory is true has arisen from a failure to distinguish between conditions (...)
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  3. Mikel Burley (2008). The B-Theory of Time and the Fear of Death. Polish Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):21-38.score: 1236.0
    This paper discusses Robin Le Poidevin’s proposal that a commitment to the B-theory of time provides a reason to relinquish the fear of death. After outlining Le Poidevin’s views on time and death, I analyze the specific passages in which he makes his proposal, giving close attention to the claim that, for the B-theorist, one’s life is “eternally real.” I distinguish two possible interpretations of this claim, which I call alethic eternalism and ontic eternalism respectively, and argue, (...)
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  4. Dirck Vorenkamp (1995). B-Series Temporal Order in Dōgen's Theory of Time. Philosophy East and West 45 (3):387-408.score: 1203.0
    Dōgen's views of time are descriptively compared to the modern western philosophical view called "B-theory" and found to contain elements of each of the four main tenets of the B-theory. Furthermore, a fundamental incongruency is discovered. Even accounting for traditional Buddhist approaches to apparent contradictions, Dōgen's problems in this regard call into question the assumption of consistency that has characterized modern interpretations of his views on time.
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  5. Dean Zimmerman (2010). The A-Theory of Time, Presentism, and Open Theism. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 789--809.score: 1188.0
    This chapter contains sections titled: * I Introduction * II A-Theories and B-Theories * III Competing Versions of the A-Theory * IV Presentism a Trivial Truth? * V Open Theism and the A-Theory of Time * VI The “Truthmaker” Argument * VII Conclusion * Notes.
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  6. Simon Prosser (2000). A New Problem for the a-Theory of Time. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (201):494-498.score: 1183.0
    : I offer a new approach to the increasingly convoluted debate between the A- and B-theories of time, the ‘tensed’ and ‘tenseless’ theories. It is often assumed that the B-theory faces more difficulties than the A-theory in explaining the apparently tensed features of temporal experience. I argue that the A-theory cannot explain these features at all, because on any physicalist or supervenience theory of the mind, in which the nature of experience is fixed by the physical state of (...)
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  7. Tobias Hansson Wahlberg (2009). Objects in Time: Studies of Persistence in B-Time. Dissertation, Lund Universityscore: 1152.0
    This thesis is about the conceptualization of persistence of physical, middle-sized objects within the theoretical framework of the revisionary ‘B-theory’ of time. According to the B-theory, time does not flow, but is an extended and inherently directed fourth dimension along which the history of the universe is ‘laid out’ once and for all. It is a widespread view among philosophers that if we accept the B-theory, the commonsensical ‘endurance theory’ of persistence will have to be (...)
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  8. Dean W. Zimmerman (2005). The A-Theory of Time, the B-Theory of Time, and 'Taking Tense Seriously'. Dialectica 59 (4):401–457.score: 1135.0
    The paper has two parts: First, I describe a relatively popular thesis in the philosophy of propositional attitudes, worthy of the name “taking tense seriously”; and I distinguish it from a family of views in the metaphysics of time, namely, the A-theories (or what are sometimes called “tensed theories of time”). Once the distinction is in focus, a skeptical worry arises. Some A-theorists maintain that the difference between past, present, and future, is to be drawn in terms of (...)
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  9. Jeff Russell (forthcoming). This Paper's Thesis Ought to Be Unnecessary; It is the Sort of Claim That Only Requires Defense Because of the Assaults on Intuition Raised by Impudent Philosophers. The Point Under Attack, to Whose Defense I Rally, is the Reality of Time. In This Paper I Examine the Argument for the Unreality of Time Raised by JME McTaggart, First in its Classic Form, and Then as John Earman Recasts It in the Context of the General Theory of Relativity (GTR). McTaggart Characterizes Time in Two Ways, One in Terms of the Predicates" Past"," Present" and" Future", and Another in Terms of the Relations" Before"," After", and" Simultaneous". The First Characterization Puts Events in Time in an A-Series; the Second Orders Them as a B-Series. Then McTaggart's Argument Runs as Follows. [REVIEW] Philosophy.score: 990.0
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  10. H. S. Kariel (1992). Books in Review: The Idea of Political Theory: Reflections on the Self in Political Time and Space by Tracy B. Strong. [REVIEW] Political Theory 20 (2):345-348.score: 972.0
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  11. Alasdair MacIntyre (1991). Book Review:The Idea of Political Theory: Reflections on the Self in Political Time and Place. Tracy B. Strong. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (4):878-.score: 960.0
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  12. Edward Freeman (forthcoming). On McTaggart's Theory of Time. History of Philosophy Quarterly.score: 906.0
    McTaggart’s theory of time is the locus classicus of the contemporary philosophy of time. However, despite its prominence, there is little agreement as to what the theory actually amounts. In this paper, it is first argued that, contrary to the received opinion, McTaggart’s A-time/B-time distinction is not a distinction between static and fluid temporal series. Rather, it is a certain distinction between two types of static temporal series. It is then shown that in his temporal transience (...)
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  13. Daniel M. Johnson (2013). B-Theory Old and New: On Ontological Commitment. Synthese 190 (17):3953-3970.score: 882.0
    The most important argument against the B-theory of time is the paraphrase argument. The major defense against that argument is the “new” tenseless theory of time, which is built on what I will call the “indexical reply” to the paraphrase argument. The move from the “old” tenseless theory of time to the new is most centrally a change of viewpoint about the nature and determiners of ontological commitment. Ironically, though, the new tenseless theorists have generally not (...)
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  14. Mikel Burley (2006). Beyond “Beyond a- and B-Time”. Philosophia 34 (4):411-416.score: 840.0
    This Article critically discusses Clifford Williams’ claim that the A-theory and B-theory of time are indistinguishable. I examine three considerations adduced by Williams to support his claim that the concept of time essentially includes transition as well as extension, and argue that, despite its prima facie plausibility, the claim has not been adequately justified. Williams therefore begs the question against the B-theorist, who denies that transition is essential. By Williams’ own lights, he ought to deny that the (...)
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  15. Natalja Deng (2010). 'Beyond A- and B-Time' Reconsidered. Philosophia 38 (4):741-753.score: 838.0
    This article is a response to Clifford Williams’s claim that the debate between A- and B theories of time is misconceived because these theories do not differ. I provide some missing support for Williams’s claim that the B-theory includes transition, by arguing that representative B-theoretic explanations for why we experience time as passing (even though it does not) are inherently unstable. I then argue that, contra Williams, it does not follow that there is nothing at stake in (...)
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  16. Dean Zimmerman (2008). The Privileged Present : Defending an "a-Theory" of Time. In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell Pub.. 211--225.score: 813.0
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  17. Michael J. Futch (2002). Leibniz's Non-Tensed Theory of Time. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (2):125 – 139.score: 801.0
    Leibniz's philosophy of time, often seen as a precursor to current forms of relationalism and causal theories of time, has rightly earned the admiration of his more recent counterparts in the philosophy of science. In this article, I examine Leibniz's philosophy of time from a new perspective: the role that tense and non-tensed temporal properties/relations play in it. Specifically, I argue that Leibniz's philosophy of time is best (and non-anachronistically) construed as a non-tensed theory of (...), one that dispenses with tensed temporal properties such as past, present, and future. In arguing for this thesis, I focus on the three facets of Leibniz's philosophy most relevant for evaluating his commitment to a B-theory of time: (1) the nature of change, (2) the reality of the future, and (3) the truth-conditions for tensed temporal statements. Despite prima facie evidence to the contrary, I show that a close examination of Leibniz's views on these topics provides compelling evidence for interpreting his philosophy of time as a B-theory of time. (shrink)
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  18. Robin Le Poidevin (2013). Stopped Clocks, Silent Telephones and Sense Data: Some Problems of Time Perception. [REVIEW] Topoi:1-8.score: 792.0
    When philosophers of perception contemplate concrete examples, the tendency is to choose perceptions whose content does not essentially involve time, but concern how things are at the moment they are perceived. This is true whether the cases are veridical (seeing a tree as a tree) or illusory (misperceiving the colour or spatial properties of an object). Less discussed, and arguably more complex and interesting cases do involve time as an essential element: perceiving movement, for example, or perceiving the (...)
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  19. L. Nathan Oaklander (1996). Mctaggart's Paradox and Smith's Tensed Theory of Time. Synthese 107 (2):205 - 221.score: 786.0
    Since McTaggart first proposed his paradox asserting the unreality of time, numerous philosophers have attempted to defend the tensed theory of time against it. Certainly, one of the most highly developed and original is that put forth by Quentin Smith. Through discussing McTaggart's positive conception of time as well as his negative attack on its reality, I hope to clarify the dispute between those who believe in the existence of the transitory temporal properties of pastness, presentness and (...)
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  20. Cheng-Chih Tsai (2011). A Unified Tenseless Theory of Time. Prolegomena 10 (1):5-37.score: 786.0
    Concerning the versions of the Tenseless Theory of Time, the Old Btheory has two: the Date-analysis version and the Token-reflexive version, while the New B-theory has three: the Date-analysis, the Token-reflexive and the Sentence-type versions. Each of these five versions of the B-theory has received serious attacks from the A-theorists, some of whom even claim that the tenseless theory “though still widely held, is a theory in retreat” (Craig 1996), and that “if Quentin Smith (1993) delivered the (...)
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  21. Simon Prosser (2007). Could We Experience the Passage of Time? Ratio 20 (1):75-90.score: 783.0
    This is an expanded and revised discussion of the argument briefly put forward in my 'A New Problem for the A-Theory of Time', where it is claimed that it is impossible to experience real temporal passage and that no such phenomenon exists. In the first half of the paper the premises of the argument are discussed in more detail than before. In the second half responses are given to several possible objections, none of which were addressed in the earlier (...)
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  22. Natalja Deng (2013). Our Experience of Passage on the B-Theory. Erkenntnis 78 (4):713-726.score: 769.0
    Elsewhere I have suggested that the B-theory includes a notion of passage, by virtue of including succession. Here, I provide further support for that claim by showing that uncontroversial elements of the B-theory straightforwardly ground a veridical sense of passage. First, I argue that the B-theory predicts that subjects of experience have a sense of passivity with respect to time that they do not have with respect to space, which they are right to have, even according (...)
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  23. Heather Dyke (2003). What Moral Realism Can Learn From the Philosophy of Time. In , Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 11--25.score: 764.0
    It sometimes happens that advances in one area of philosophy can be applied to a quite different area of philosophy, and that the result is an unexpected significant advance. I think that this is true of the philosophy of time and meta-ethics. Developments in the philosophy of time have led to a new understanding of the relation between semantics and metaphysics. Applying these insights to the field of meta-ethics, I will argue, can suggest a new position with respect (...)
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  24. Paul Helm (2002). Time and Time Again: Two Volumes by William Lane Craig William Lane Craig the Tensed Theory of Time: A Critical Examination. Synthese Library Volume 293. (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000). Pp. V+287. £78.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0792366344. William Lane Craig the Tenseless Theory of Time: A Critical Examination. Synthese Library Volume 294. (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000). Pp. V+256. £65.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0792366352. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 38 (4):489-498.score: 699.0
    The two books make a notable contribution in drawing together many of the philosophical problems about time, and the associated literature. The expositions are also valuable for their interdisciplinary strengths, especially in the history and philosophy of science and (to a lesser extent) in theology, and for the clarity and thoroughness of Craig's approach. However, the two books do not present, as might at first appear, a side by side exposition of the respective strengths and weaknesses of the A-series (...)
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  25. David Malament (2004). On the Time Reversal Invariance of Classical Electromagnetic Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (2):295-315.score: 696.0
    David Albert claims that classical electromagnetic theory is not time reversal invariant. He acknowledges that all physics books say that it is, but claims they are ``simply wrong" because they rely on an incorrect account of how the time reversal operator acts on magnetic fields. On that account, electric fields are left intact by the operator, but magnetic fields are inverted. Albert sees no reason for the asymmetric treatment, and insists that neither field should be inverted. I argue, (...)
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  26. Tobias Hansson Wahlberg (2009). Endurance Per Se in B-Time. Metaphysica 10 (2):175-183.score: 696.0
    Three arguments for the conclusion that objects cannot endure in B-time even if they remain intrinsically unchanged are examined: Carter and Hestevolds enduring-objects-as-universals argument (American Philosophical Quarterly 31(4):269-283, 1994) and Barker and Dowe's paradox 1 and paradox 2 (Analysis 63(2):106-114, 2003, Analysis 65(1):69-74, 2005). All three are shown to fail.
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  27. Michelle Beer (2007). A Defense of the Co-Reporting Theory of Tensed and Tenseless Essences. Philo 10 (1):59-65.score: 696.0
    The co-reporting theory holds that for every A-sentence-token there is a B-sentence that differs in sense but reports the same event orstate of affairs. Thus, if it is now t7, what is reported by now tokening “It is t7 now” is identical with what is reported by tokening “It is t7 at t7.” Quentin Smith has argued that the fact that the sentence-tokens differ in sense but are co-reporting is compatible with the A-theory supposition that their difference in sense consists (...)
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  28. Mario Bacelar Valente, Time in the Theory of Relativity: On Natural Clocks, Proper Time, the Clock Hypothesis, and All That.score: 684.0
    When addressing the notion of proper time in the theory of relativity, it is usually taken for granted that the time read by an accelerated clock is given by the Minkowski proper time. However, there are authors like Harvey Brown that consider necessary an extra assumption to arrive at this result, the so-called clock hypothesis. In opposition to Brown, Richard TW Arthur takes the clock hypothesis to be already implicit in the theory. In this paper I will (...)
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  29. Dr John Yates (2008). Category Theory Applied to a Radically New but Logically Essential Description of Time and Space. Cogprints.score: 684.0
    McTaggart's ideas on the unreality of time as expressed in "The Nature of Existence" have retained great interest for many years for scholars, academics and other philosophers. In this essay, there is a brief discussion which mentions some of the high points of this philosophical interest, and goes on to apply his ideas to modern physics and neuroscience. It does not discuss McTaggart's C and D series, but does emphasise how the use of derived versions of both his A (...)
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  30. Mario Bacelar Valente, The Flow of Time in the Theory of Relativity.score: 684.0
    Dennis Dieks advanced the view that the idea of flow of time is implemented in the theory of relativity. The ‘flow’ results from the successive happening/becoming of events along the time-like worldline of a material system. This leads to a view of now as local to each worldline. Each past event of the worldline has occurred once as a nowpoint,and we take there to be an ever-changing present now-point ‘marking’ the unfolding of a physical system. In Dieks’ approach (...)
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  31. Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (1998). Mctaggart and the Unreality of Time. Axiomathes 9 (3):287-306.score: 676.0
    McTaggart's argument for the unreality of time is generally believed to be a self-contained argument independent of McTaggart's idealist ontology. I argue that this is mistaken. It is really a demonstration of a contradiction in the appearance of time, on the basis of certain a priori ontological axioms, in particular the thesis that all times exist in parity. When understood in this way, the argument is neither obscure or unfounded, but arguably does not address those versions of the (...)
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  32. K. Okano, L. Schülke & B. Zheng (1997). Short-Time Critical Dynamics of Statistical Systems and Field Theory. Foundations of Physics 27 (12):1739-1764.score: 672.0
    Recent investigation on the short-time dynamic scaling of critical dynamics is reviewed, with the aim of applying it to the field theory. The contents of this paper are as follows: (1) Short-time behavior of the critical relaxation dynamics, (2) Numerical evidence of the short-time scaling—2-dimensional Ising model and Universality, (3) Theoretical background of the generalized scaling form, (4) Application to a field theoretical model—(2+1)-dimensional SU(2) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature, and (5) Concluding remarks.
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  33. Tobias Hansson (2007). The Problem(s) of Change Revisited. Dialectica 61 (2):265–274.score: 672.0
    Two recurrent arguments levelled against the view that enduring objects survive change are examined within the framework of the B-theory of time: the argument from Leibniz's Law and the argument from Instantiation of Incompatible Properties. Both arguments are shown to be question-begging and hence unsuccessful.
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  34. Matt Farr (2012). On A- and B-Theoretic Elements of Branching Spacetimes. Synthese 188 (1):85-116.score: 666.0
    This paper assesses branching spacetime theories in light of metaphysical considerations concerning time. I present the A, B, and C series in terms of the temporal structure they impose on sets of events, and raise problems for two elements of extant branching spacetime theories—McCall’s ‘branch attrition’, and the ‘no backward branching’ feature of Belnap’s ‘branching space-time’—in terms of their respective A- and B-theoretic nature. I argue that McCall’s presentation of branch attrition can only be coherently formulated on a (...)
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  35. Sean Enda Power (forthcoming). Perceiving Multiple Locations in Time: A Phenomenological Defence of Tenseless Theory. Topoi:1-7.score: 661.5
    It is a common claim that one concept of time, tenseless theory, is in greater conflict with how the world seems to us (with the phenomenology) than the competing theories of tense theory and presentism. This paper offers at least one counter-example to that claim. Here, it is argued that tenseless theory fares better than its competitors in capturing the phenomenology in particular cases of perception. These cases are where the visual phenomenology is of events occurring together which must (...)
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  36. David Bohm (1973). Quantum Theory as an Indication of a New Order in Physics. B. Implicate and Explicate Order in Physical Law. Foundations of Physics 3 (2):139-168.score: 660.0
    In this paper, we inquire further into the question of the emergence of new orders in physics, first raised in an earlier paper. In this inquiry, we are led to suggest that the quantum theory indicates the need for yet another new order, which we call “enfolded” or “implicate.” One of the most striking examples of the implicate order is to be seen by considering the function of the hologram, which clearly reveals how a total content (in principle extending over (...)
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  37. Jonathan Tallant (2008). What is It to “B” a Relation? Synthese 162 (1):117 - 132.score: 657.0
    The purpose of this paper is two fold: first, I look to show Oaklander’s (The ontology of time. New York: Prometheus Books, 2004) theory of time to be false. Second, I show that the only way to salvage the B-theory is via the adopting of the causal theory of time, and allying this to Oaklander’s claim that tense is to be eliminated. I then raise some concerns with the causal theory of time. My conclusion is (...)
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  38. Akiko M. Frischhut (2013). What Experience Cannot Teach Us About Time. Topoi:1-13.score: 654.0
    Does the A-theory have an intuitive advantage over the B-theory? Many A-theorists have claimed so, arguing that their theory has a much better explanation for the fact that we all experience the passage of time: we experience time as passing because time really does pass. In this paper I expose and reject the argument behind the A-theorist’s claim. I argue that all parties have conceded far too easily that there is an experience that needs explaining in (...)
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  39. Clifford E. Williams (1992). The Phenomenology of B-Time. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):123-137.score: 648.0
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  40. L. Nathan Oaklander (2008). Two Versions B-Theory Of. In , The Philosophy of Time. Routledge. 1--398.score: 639.0
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  41. Michelle Beer (2010). Tense and Truth Conditions. Philosophia 38 (2):265-269.score: 612.0
    The B-theory of time holds that McTaggart’s A-series of past, present, and future is reducible to the B-series of events running from earlier to later. According to the date-theory—originally put forth by J.J.C. Smart and later endorsed by by D.H. Mellor—the truth conditions of tensed or Asentence-tokens can be given in terms of tenseless or B-sentences and, therefore, A-sentence-tokens do not ascribe any A-determinations of pastness, presentness, or futurity. However, as Nathan Oaklander has argued, the date-theory does not (...)
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  42. Robert Francescotti (2008). Endurance and Discernibility. Metaphysica 9 (2):193-204.score: 612.0
    How can an object remain the same, numerically identical, while undergoing change? This is a worry for endurantists, who hold that for any stages, x and y, of a persisting object, x is numerically identical with y. Endurantists might try to avoid the problem of change by insisting that all properties are temporally anchored. It is argued here that while this strategy helps in many cases, it does not help in all. A type of case is presented in which a (...)
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  43. Edwin B. Holt (1904). Dr. Montague's Theory of Time-Perception. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 1 (12):320-323.score: 609.0
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  44. M. B. M. (1968). Kant's Theory of Time. Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):139-139.score: 609.0
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  45. Hadyn D. Ellis (1973). An Examination of the Adaptation-Level Theory Account of Time Errors. Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (1):160-163.score: 607.5
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  46. Baptiste Le Bihan (2014). The Unrealities of Time. Dialogue.score: 606.0
    Is time flowing? A-theorists say yes, B-theorists say no. But both take time to be real. It means that B-theorists accept that time might be real, even if lacking a property usually ascribed to it. In this paper, I want to ask what are the different properties usually ascribed to time in order to draw the list of different possible kinds of realism and anti-realism about time. As we will see, there are three main kinds (...)
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  47. Heather Dyke (1998). Real Times and Possible Worlds. In Robin le Poidevin (ed.), Questions of time and tense. Oxford University Press. 93--117.score: 599.0
    There are ways in which the new tenseless theory of time is analogous to David Lewis’s modal realism. The new tenseless theory gives an indexical analysis of temporal terms such as ‘now’, while Lewis gives and indexical analysis of ‘actual’. For the new tenseless theory, all times are equally real; for Lewis, all worlds are equally real. In this paper I investigate this apparent analogy between these two theories, and ask whether a proponent of one is committed, by parity (...)
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  48. Alexander R. Pruss (2011). The A-Theory of Time and Induction. Philosophical Studies 152 (3):335 - 345.score: 598.5
    The A-theory of time says that it is an objective, non-perspectival fact about the world that some events are present, while others were present or will be present. I shall argue that the A-theory has some implausible consequences for inductive reasoning. In particular, the presentist version of the A-theory, which holds that the difference between the present and the non-present consists in the present events being the only ones that exist, is very much in trouble.
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  49. Giorgio Marchetti (2000). Observation Levels and Units of Time: A Critical Analysis of the Main Assumption of the Theory of the Artificial. [REVIEW] AI and Society 14 (3-4):331-347.score: 594.0
    Negrotti's theory of the artificial is based on the fundamental assumption that the human being cannot select more than one observation level per unit of time. Since this assumption has important consequences for the theory of knowledge — knowledge cannot be synthesised but only further differentiated — its plausibility is tested against two aspects that characterise any theory of knowledge: knowledge production and knowledge application. The way in which the human being produces and applies knowledge is analysed, and a (...)
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  50. L. Nathan Oaklander (2001). Is There a Difference Between the Metaphysics of A- and B-Time? Journal of Philosophical Research 26:23-36.score: 584.0
    Clifford Williams has recently argued that the dispute between A- and B-theories, or tensed and tenseless theories of time, is spurious because once the confusions between the two theories are cleared away there is no real metaphysical difference between them. The purpose of this paper is to dispute Williams’s thesis. I argue that there are important metaphysical differences between the two theories and that, moreover, some of the claims that Williams makes in his article suggest that he is sympathetic (...)
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