Search results for 'B. I. X. H' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. H. I. Bell (1928). A Study of Greek Documents Die antiken Grundlagen der frühmittelalterlichen Privaturkunde (Grundriss der Geschichtswissenschaft. Ergänzungsband I.). Von H. Steinacker. Pp. x + 171. Leipzig, Berlin: B. G. Teubner, 1927. RM. 10. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (05):199-200.score: 1038.0
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  2. H. I. Bell (1914). Graeco-Roman Egypt De Magistratibus Aegyptiis externas Lagidarum Regni Provincias administrantibus. Scripsit D. Cohen. 8vo. Pp. xii + 114. 's Gravenhage: L. Levisson, n.d. Hfl. 4.50 (M. 8, Frs. 9.50). Quaestiones Epiphanianae metrologicae et criticae. Scripsit Oscarius Viedebantt. 8vo. Pp. x. + 140. 1 plate and tables. Lipsiae: B. G. Teubner, 1911. M. 6. Ägyptisches Vereinswesen zur Zeit der Ptolemäer und Römer. Dr Von Jur. Mariano San Nicolò. IerBand. 8vo. Pp. 225. München: C. H. Beck'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1913. Der Fiskus der Ptolemaeer: I. Seine Spezialbeamten und sein öffentlich rechtlicher Charakter. Dr Von. Jur. Alfons Steiner. 8vo. Pp. 66. Leipzig, Berlin: B. G. Teubner, 1913. Unbound, M. 2.40; bound, M. 3.60. Ptolemäisches Prozessrecht: Studien zur ptolemäischen Gerichtsverfassung und zum Gerichtsverfahren. Heft I. Dr Von. Jur. Gregor Semeka. 8vo. Pp. v + 311. Munchen: C. H. Beck'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1913. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (06):198-201.score: 1008.0
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  3. L. J. D. Richardson (1938). A New Version of the Aeneid Unwin S. Barrett and J. H. O. Johnston: The Aeneid of Vergil. (Books I-IX Translated by U. S. B., Books X-XII by J. H. O. J.) Pp. 444. Pretoria: van Schaik, 1937. Cloth, 15s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (06):226-227.score: 990.0
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  4. H. Mattingly (1936). X. K. Καπνουκαγ Ας: ''H Ρχα Α 'Pωμα Α.' Pp. 139; Illustrations. (Bιβλιοθ Κη 'Aνωτ Ρας Σχολ Σ Mορφ Σ Ως 'Eλλην Δων 'Iον Ου Σχολ Σ, I.) Athens, 1935. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):40-.score: 972.0
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  5. B. H. Kemball-Cook (1960). Some School Books E. C. Kennedy and Bertha Tilley: Trojan Aeneas. Pp. Xxi + 135; 8 Plates. Cambridge: University Press, 1959. Cloth, 6s. C. G. Cooper: Journey to Hesperia. Pp. Lxii + 189; 16 Plates. London: Macmillan, 1959. Cloth, 7s. 6d. R. Roebuck: Cornelius Nepos, Three Lives (Alcibiades, Dion, Atticus). Pp. Vi + 138; 8 Plates. London: Bell, 1958. Cloth, 5s. E. C. Kennedy: Caesar, De Bella Gallico Iii. Pp. 107: 1 Plate, 2 Maps. Cambridge: University Press, 1959. Cloth, 6s. E. C. Kennedy: Caesar, De Bella Gallico Iii. Pp. 224: 1 Plate, 4 Maps and Plans. Cambridge: University Press, 1959. Cloth, 6s. R. C. Reeves: Horrenda. Pp. 159; Drawings. Slough: Centaur Books, 1958. Cloth, 8s. 6d. G. S. Thompson and C. H. Craddock: Latin. A Four Year Course to G.C.E. Ordinary Level: Book I. Pp. Xi + 218: 5 Maps. London and Glasgow: Blackie. Cloth, 7s. 6d. S. K. Bailey: Roman Life and Letters. A Reader for the Sixth Form. Pp. X + 195; 7 Plates. London: Macmillan, 1959. Cloth, 7s. 6d. S. K. Bailey:. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 10 (03):252-253.score: 588.0
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  6. R. B. Onians (1929). An Essay in Comparative Literature God, Man, and Epic Poetry. A Study in Comparative Literature. by H. V. Routh, M.A., University Reader in English Language and Literature, London. Vol. I., Pp. X + 232 (Classical); Vol. II., Pp. Xii + 283 (Medieval). Cambridge: The University Press, 1927. 12s. 6d. Each Volume. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (06):215-217.score: 552.0
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  7. S. H. A. (1914). Veröffentlichungen Aus der Papyrus-Sammlung der K. Hof- Und Staatsbibliothek Zu München. I. Byzantinische Papyri, 1 Vol. 4 to. Pp. X + 203. One Portfolio of Facsimiles. Leipzig and Berlin: B. G. Teubner, 1914. M. 28. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (07):250-251.score: 552.0
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  8. W. H. S. Jones (1928). The Teubner Medical Corpus 1. Corpus Medicorum Graecorum: Oribasios. Edidit J. Raeder. Pp. X + 498. Berlin: B. G. Teubner. 2. Corpus Medicorum Graecorum: Hippocratis Indices Librorum, Lusiurandum, Lex, De Arte, De Medico, De Decente Habitu, Praeceptiones, De Prisca Medicina, De Aere Locis Aquis, De Alimento, De Liquidorum Usu, De Flatibus. Edidit I. L. Heiberg. Pp. Xii + 146. Berlin: B. G. Teubner. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):29-.score: 552.0
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  9. David Schweickart, Economic Democracy: A W o R T H y S o C I a L I S M That Would Really Work.score: 432.0
    w a y s h a v e b e e n . W e a l l r e m e m b e r M a (...) r x ' s p o l e m i c a g a i n s t P r o u d h o n , t h e Manifesto's critique of "historical action [yielding] to personal inventive action, historically created conditions of emancipation to fantastic ones, and the gradual spontaneous class organizations of the proletariat to an organization of society specially contrived by these inventors" (Marx and Engels, 1986, 64), and the numerous other occasions when the fathers of "scientific socialism" went a f t e r t h e " u t o p i a n s . " I n general this Marxian aversion to drawing up blueprints has been healthy, fueled at least in part by a respect for the concrete specificity of the revolutionary situation and for the agents engaged in revolutionary activity: it is not the business of Marxist intellectuals to tell the agents of revolution how they are to construct their postrevolutionary economy. (shrink)
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  10. Hartley Slater, Motivation by de Se Beliefs B.H.Slater.score: 288.0
    Such a misconception of grammar characterises a very popular approach to indexicality which has been current since the 1970s, stemming from the work of Casteñeda, and Kaplan. (...)
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  11. Andrew Kuper, D E B at E.score: 258.0
    The main thrust of my argument was that ad hoc su gge s ti ons of ch a ri ty cannot replace a systematic and theoreti c (...)
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  12. B. I. X. H. (2008). Contract Rights and Remedies, and the Divergence Between Law and Morality. Ratio Juris 21 (2):194-211.score: 201.0
    Abstract. There is an ongoing debate in the philosophical and jurisprudential literature regarding the nature and possibility of Contract theory. On one hand, are those who argue (...)
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  13. Joseph Agassi, ©FacultyofEducation,UniversityofCalgary,1999 Science Education Without Pressure.score: 198.0
    The traditional, dogmatic educational sys tem was reinforced by the addition of science instruction to its curriculum. Three errors are reinforced by this move and the subsequent (...)
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  14. Francis Jeffry Pelletier, Thephilosophyofautomatedtheoremproving.score: 198.0
    Different researchers use "the philosophy of automated theorem p r o v i n g " t o cover d i f f e r e n t (...) concepts, indeed, different levels of concepts. Some w o u l d count such issues as h o w to e f f i c i e n t l y i n d e x databases as part of the philosophy of automated theorem p r o v i n g . Others wonder about whether f o r m u l a s should be represented as strings or as trees or as lists, and call this part of the philosophy of automated theorem p r o v i n g . Yet others concern themselves w i t h what k i n d o f search should b e embodied i n a n y automated theorem prover, or to what degree any automated theorem prover should resemble Prolog. Still others debate whether natural deduction or semantic tableaux or resolution is " b e t t e r " , a n d c a l l t h i s a part of the p h i l o s o p h y of automated theorem p r o v i n g . Some people wonder whether automated theorem p r o v i n g should be " h u m a n oriented" or "machine o r i e n t e d " — sometimes arguing about whether the internal p r o o f methods should be " h u m a n - I i k e " or not, sometimes arguing about whether the generated proof should be output in a f o r m u n d e r s t a n d a b l e by p e o p l e , and sometimes a r g u i n g a b o u t the d e s i r a b i l i t y o f h u m a n intervention in the process of constructing a proof. There are also those w h o ask such questions as whether we s h o u l d even be concerned w i t h completeness or w i t h soundness of a system, or perhaps we should instead look at very efficient (but i n c o m p l e t e ) subsystems or look at methods of generating models w h i c h might nevertheless validate invalid arguments. A n d a l l of these have been v i e w e d as issues in the philosophy of automated theorem proving. Here, I w o u l d l i k e to step back from such i m p l e m e n t - ation issues and ask: " W h a t do we really think we are doing when we w r i t e an automated theorem prover?" My reflections are perhaps idiosyncratic, but I do think that they put the different researchers* efforts into a broader perspective, and give us some k i n d of handle on w h i c h directions we ourselves m i g h t w i s h to pursue when constructing (or extending) an automated theorem proving system. A logic is defined to be (i) a vocabulary and formation rules ( w h i c h tells us w h a t strings of symbols are w e l l - formed formulas in the logic), and ( i i ) a definition of ' p r o o f in that system ( w h i c h tells us the conditions under which an arrangement of formulas in the system constitutes a proof). Historically speaking, definitions of ' p r o o f have been given in various different manners: the most c o m m o n have been H i l b e r t - s t y l e ( a x i o m a t i c ) , Gentzen-style (consecution, or sequent), F i t c h - s t y l e (natural deduction), and Beth-style (tableaux).. (shrink)
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  15. Eddy M. Zemach (1974). In Defence of Relative Identity. Philosophical Studies 26 (3-4):207 - 218.score: 192.0
    I defend a slightly modified version of geach's rule r, I.E., That although both a and b are g, It is possible for a to be (...) the same f as b and a different h than b, Provided that the question whether a and b are the same g is undecidable. Answering those who object to relative identity I claim that they tacitly adhere to a false fregean view, I.E., That one cannot use a singular term to denote an entity x if it is not true that for every y, X=y or not x=y. I show, However, That such terms are, And must be, Used by every empirically oriented language with finite or infinite predicative arsenal, And hence relative identity is more handy than absolute identity. Finally I give a version of leibniz's law for relative identity. (shrink)
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  16. Mohan Matthen (1982). Plato's Treatment of Relational Statements in the Phaedo. Phronesis 27 (1):90-100.score: 192.0
    The author attempts here to sketch the beginnings of an adequate interpretation of Plato's treatment of the tall and the equal in the "Phaedo". The (...)
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  17. Martin Cohen (2005). Wittgenstein's Beetle and Other Classic Thought Experiments. Blackwell Pub..score: 192.0
    A is for Alice and astronomers arguing about acceleration -- B is for Bernard's body-exchange machine -- C is for the Catholic cannibal -- D is for Maxwell (...)'s demon -- E is for evolution (and an embarrassing problem with it) -- F is for the forms lost forever to the prisoners of the cave -- G is for Galileo's gravitational balls -- H is for Hume's shades -- I is for the identity of indiscernibles -- J is for Henri Poincaré and alternative geometries -- K is for the Kritik and Kant's kind of thought experiments -- L is for Lucretius' spear -- M is for Mach's motionless chain -- N is for Newton's bucket -- O is for Olbers' paradox -- P is for Parfit's person -- Q is for the questions raised by thought experiments quotidiennes -- R is for the rule-ruled room -- S is for Salvatius' ship, sailing along its own space-time line -- T is for the time-travelling twins -- U is for the universe, and Einstein's attempts to understand it -- V is for the vexed case of the violinist -- W is for Wittgenstein's beetle -- X is for xenophanes and thinking by examples -- Y is for counterfactuals and a backwards approach to history -- Z is for Zeno and the mysteries of infinity. (shrink)
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  18. W. Drechsler (1989). Modified Weyl Theory and Extended Elementary Objects. Foundations of Physics 19 (12):1479-1497.score: 192.0
    To represent extension of objects in particle physics, a modified Weyl theory is used by gauging the curvature radius of the local fibers in a soldered bundle (...)
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  19. Manuel Atienza (2010). A vueltas con la ponderación. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 44:43-59.score: 192.0
    E l auto r , a pa r ti r de l análisi s d e un a seri e d e ejemplo s d e ponderació n (...) judicial , trat a de contesta r la s cuestione s centrale s de l debat e enta b lad o e n l a teorí a de l derech o contemporánea entr e pa r tidario s y crítico s d e est e pa r ticula r procedimient o a r gumentat i vo qu e po r l o demás e s d e u n us o frecuent e e n nuestro s tribunales , especialment e e n lo s tribunale s supremos y constitucionales . E n prime r luga r , tomand o com o punt o d e pa r tid a la s apo r tacione s de Al e x y , trat a d e responde r a la s cuestione s d e e n qu é consist e l a ponderación , cuále s son su s característica s y e n qu é s e diferenci a d e l a subsunción . E n s e gund o luga r , abord a el pro b lem a d e cuánd o h a y qu e pondera r y cuánd o est á justi f icad o hacerlo . F inalmente , trata d e responde r a l a cuestió n d e s i l a ponderació n e s u n procedimient o raciona l y e n qu é consist e es a racionalida d , mostrand o frent e a su s crítico s cóm o lo s criterio s d e l a ponderación utilizado s e n la s decisione s d e lo s tribunales , y e n concret o de l T ribuna l Constitucional, puede n se r considerado s u n bue n ejempl o d e cóm o pued e opera r l a racionalida d práctica e n e l ámbit o de l derecho. (shrink)
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  20. Ulrich Kohlenbach (1992). Remarks on Herbrand Normal Forms and Herbrand Realizations. Archive for Mathematical Logic 31 (5):305-317.score: 192.0
    LetA H be the Herbrand normal form ofA andA H,D a Herbrand realization ofA H. We showThere is an example of an (open) theory + with (...)function parameters such that for someA not containing function parameters Similar for first order theories + if the index functions used in definingA H are permitted to occur in instances of non-logical axiom schemata of , i.e. for suitable ,A In fact, in (1) we can take for + the fragment (Σ 1 0 -IA)+ of second order arithmetic with induction restricted toΣ 1 0 -formulas, and in (2) we can take for the fragment (Σ 1 0,b -IA) of first order arithmetic with induction restricted to formulas VxA(x) whereA contains only bounded quantifiers.On the other hand, $$PA^2 \vdash A^H \Rightarrow PA \vdash A,$$ wherePA 2 is the extension of first order arithmeticPA obtained by adding quantifiers for functions andA(PA). This generalizes to extensional arithmetic in the language of all finite types but not to sentencesA with positively occurring existential quantifiers for functions. (shrink)
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  21. Gregory Kirk Murray (2011). Covering Giorgio Agamben's Nudities. Continent 1 (2):145-147.score: 192.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 145-147. Here I accoutred myself in my new habiliments; and, having em- ployed the same precautions as before, retired from my lodging at (...) a time least exposed to observation. It is unnecessary to des- cribe the particulars of my new equipage; suffice it to say, that one of my cares was to discolour my complexion, and give it the dun and sallow hue which is in most instances characteristic of the tribe to which I assumed to belong; and that when my metamorphosis was finished, I could not, upon the strictest ex- amination, conceive that any one could have traced out the per- son of Caleb Williams in this new disguise. William Godwin Caleb Williams (352). Giorgio Agamben. Nudities . Trans. David Kishik and Stefan Pedatella. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2011. 144 pp. | 10 illustrations. | ISBN: 9780804769501 | $16.95 A. The Protective Overcoat. The most pervasive, resilient, robust, sneaky, and significant concept in all of Giorgio Agambens essays is that of separation. This is not the same as alienation. Separation is more nostalgic, for Agamben valorizes an ancient world in which human society and its beings were not subject to such separation. He implies that these separations are damaging to human beings, crippling them at the very level of their identities. $4.99 B. The Handsome Gloves. Giorgio Agambens Nudities , like Profanations before it, employs a wide range of subjects in order to establish separation as a metaphor, in much the same way that interdisciplinary scholars have adopted Michel Foucaults concepts in order to rethink societies and texts. The longest essay from Profanations, entitledIn Praise of Profanation,” laments humankinds inability to profane as the result of what Walter Benjamin has calledthe capitalist religion.” Likewise, “Nudityadopts a pessimistic stance on the Christian theological traditions perverse asphyxiation of the unclothed body. $2.50 C. The Hoop Earrings. Religion separates humans from things by procuring for itself items assacred,” thus taking them out of common use. In this state, human beings are unable to play with them, unable to change their use-value. They become off-limits, museified. $1,499.00 D. The Uncomfortable Shoes. Biometrics polices identity, replacing meaningful metrics of identity. It is a deplorable situation that leaves human beings in danger of, and indeed already victims of, mass persecution. $111.75 E. The Prince Albert. One could characterize Giorgio Agambens desire to catalogue a history of ignorance as a recognition that human beings are separated from knowledge by language. Where then is the prophet, and how shall we be saved? $49.50 + tip F. The Corset. Franz Kafkas character of Joseph K. has put himself on trial, as in Roman trials when the Kalumniator was marked with the letter K. The torture he undergoes is meant to elicit a confession of the truth. It is possible that Giorgio Agamben perceives his role as a philosopher to be confined to self-trial, and that with every passage he flays the unclothed page with prophetic intent. $27.00 G. The Derby. Giorgio Agamben himself tries to bridge various separations through exploratory play. He is not a performative writer semantically, but his exploratory style is rooted in the play spirit. His strategy of numbering points is almost comical, yet it is not misleading. It is play, after all, not ruse. He denudes with pecks, like carrion on a tattered corpse. $11.00 H. The Trousers. Although Giorgio Agamben is elsewhere concerned with the profanation of religions apparatuses, in essay nine he would like to consider what is consumed during days of inoperativity, how religion governs these, and how to account for our binges and purges. Inoperativity is inextricably bound to feasting, to the festival. $24.50 I. The Stylish Belt. The only essay in Nudities to contain photographs is the essay entitled, “Nudity.” All of these photographs project human bodies. $.01 I The aim here is not to tap into an original state prior to the separation but to comprehend and neutralize the apparatus that produced this separation. (66) II The contemporary is he who firmly holds his gaze on his own time so as to perceive not its light but rather its darkness. (13) III We can therefore only experience nudity as a denudation and a baring, never as a form and a stable possession. (65) IV Just as genius and talent originally distinct and even oppositeare nevertheless united in the work of the poet, so the work of creation and the work of salvation, inasmuch as they represent the two powers of a single God, remain in some way secretly conjoined. (6) V In our culture, the face-body relationship is marked by a fundamental asymmetry, in that our faces remain for the most part naked, while our bodies are normally covered. (88) VI Every man initiates a slanderous trial against himself. (21) VII The glorious body is not some other body, more agile and beautiful, more luminous and spiritual; it is the body itself, at the moment when inoperativity removes the spell from it and opens it up to a new possible common use. (103) VIII As Kleist understood so well, the relationship with a zone of nonknowledge is a dance. (114) IX The deactivation of this apparatus retroactively operates, therefore, as much on nature as on grace, as much on nudity as on clothing, liberating them from their theological signature. (90) X At any rate, whether festive inoperativity precedes religion or results from the profanation of its apparatuses, what is essential here is a dimension of praxis in which simple, quotidian human activities are neither negated nor abolished but suspended and rendered inoperative in order to be exhibited, as such, in a festive manner. (112) XI This is just how much [of] the land [the] surveyor is allowed to catch a glimpse. (36). (shrink)
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  22. Marcela Lagarde Y. De los Ríos (2003). De la igualdad formal a la diversidad. Una perspectiva étnica latinoamericana. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 37:57-79.score: 192.0
    This article ana l yses the birth of some n e w female identities in Latin America, mar k e d b y strong cultural inn o (...)
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  23. Joan Mesquida Sampol (2003). El concepto de discrecionalidad Y su control. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 37:337-358.score: 192.0
    In this paper I attempt to o f fer a concept of discretion and to an a l yse the forms of control that can be e (...)
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  24. S. M. Vinko, O. Ciricosta, B. I. Cho, K. Engelhorn, H. -K. Chung, C. R. D. Brown, T. Burian, J. Chalupský, R. W. Falcone & C. Graves (2012). Creation and Diagnosis of a Solid-Density Plasma with an X-Ray Free-Electron Laser. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 59-62.score: 174.0
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  25. Peter Singer, D E B at E.score: 168.0
    An d rew Ku per begins his cri ti que of my vi ews on poverty by accepti n g the crux of my moral argument: The (...)
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  26. H. J. N. Horsburgh (1975). Moral Black- and Whitemail. Inquiry 18 (1):23 – 38.score: 120.0
    ?Moral Black? and Whitemail? is a study of those modes of action which involve what I propose to call ?a raising of the moral stakes?. Illustration: A (...)
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  27. James H. Schmerl (2012). A Generalization of Sierpiński's Paradoxical Decompositions: Coloring Semialgebraic Grids. Journal of Symbolic Logic 77 (4):1165-1183.score: 120.0
    A structure A = (A; E₀, E₁ , . . . , ${E_{n - 2}}$) is an n-grid if each E i is an equivalence relation on A and whenver (...)X and Y are equivalence classes of, repectively, distinct E i and E j , then XY is finite. A coloring χ : An is acceptable if whenver X is an equivalence class of E i , then {ϰ Є X: χ(ϰ) = i} is finite. If B is any set, then the n-cube B n = (B n ; EE₁ , . . . , ${E_{n - 2}}$) is considinate axis. Kuratowski [9], generalizing the n = 3 case proved by Sierpiński [17], proved that n has an acceptable coloring iff ${2^{{N_0}}}$ ≤ ${N_{n - 2}}$. The main result is: of A is a semialgebraic (i.e., first-order definable in the field of reals) n-grid, then the following are equivalent: (1) if A embeds all finite n-cubes, then ${2^{{N_0}}}$ ≤ ${N_{n - 2}}$; if A embeds n , then ${2^{{N_0}}}$ ≤ ${N_{n - 2}}$; (3) A has an acceptable coloring. (shrink)
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  28. B. H. Slater, Motivation by de Se Beliefs.score: 96.0
    I have become more convinced, over the years, by the truth of Wittgensteins characterisation of philosophy as arising through misconceptions of grammar. Such a misconception of (...)grammar characterises a very popular approach to indexicality which has been current since the 1970s, stemming from the work of Casteñeda, and Kaplan. Gareth Evans was inclined to allow, for instance, that one could say ‘“To the left (I am hot)” is true, as uttered by x at t iff there is someone moderately near to the left of x such that, if he were to utter the sentenceI am hotat t, what he would thereby say is true’ (Evans 1985: 358). But not only does this disturb the proper relation between direct and indirect speech, it continues a Fregean tradition which these very cases show to be quite mistaken about the logic of intensions. In this paper, however, I want primarily to point out how this misconception of grammar has distorted our view of people. For some of the above thinkers have tried to make out that human motivation is related to the possession of a certain category of indexical belief, by Lewis calledde se beliefs’. I shall look here at how the matter arises in Hugh Mellors work on Time. In connection with Time, indexicality arises in McTaggartsA-series’, and Mellor treats this indexicality in parallel with Evanslanguage. First, therefore, I aim to show how Mellors discussion of Time grammatically misconceives the situation, and leads to a misrepresentation of the motivation of human action. But a larger conclusion about Fregean intensions is also then immediately available. (shrink)
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