60 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Barry Saunders (Queensland University of Technology)
Profile: Bret Saunders
Profile: Brooke Saunders (Marymount University)
  1.  13
    Ben Saunders (2016). Reformulating Mill’s Harm Principle. Mind 125 (500):1005-1032.
    Mill’s harm principle is commonly supposed to rest on a distinction between self-regarding conduct, which is not liable to interference, and other-regarding conduct, which is. As critics have noted, this distinction is difficult to draw. Furthermore, some of Mill’s own applications of the principle, such as his forbidding of slavery contracts, do not appear to fit with it. This article proposes that the self-regarding/other-regarding distinction is not in fact fundamental to Mill’s harm principle. The sphere of protected liberty includes not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  37
    B. A. C. Saunders & J. van Brakel (1997). Are There Nontrivial Constraints on Colour Categorization? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):167-179.
    In this target article the following hypotheses are discussed: (1) Colour is autonomous: a perceptuolinguistic and behavioural universal. (2) It is completely described by three independent attributes: hue, brightness, and saturation: (3) Phenomenologically and psychophysically there are four unique hues: red, green, blue, and yellow; (4) The unique hues are underpinned by two opponent psychophysical and/or neuronal channels: red/green, blue/yellow. The relevant literature is reviewed. We conclude: (i) Psychophysics and neurophysiology fail to set nontrivial constraints on colour categorization. (ii) Linguistic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  3. Barbara Saunders (1995). Disinterring Basic Color Terms : A Study in the Mystique of Cognitivism. History of the Human Sciences 8 (4):19-38.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  51
    B. Saunders (2010). Normative Consent and Opt-Out Organ Donation. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (2):84-87.
    One way of increasing the supply of organs available for transplant would be to switch to an opt-out system of donor registration. This is typically assumed to operate on the basis of presumed consent, but this faces the objection that not all of those who fail to opt out would actually consent to the use of their cadaveric organs. This paper defuses this objection, arguing that people's actual, explicit or implicit, consent to use their organs is not needed. It borrows (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  5.  6
    Ben Saunders (2015). Procreative Beneficence, Intelligence, and the Optimization Problem. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (6):653-668.
    According to the Principle of Procreative Beneficence, reproducers should choose the child, of those available to them, expected to have the best life. Savulescu argues reproducers are therefore morally obligated to select for nondisease traits, such as intelligence. Carter and Gordon recently challenged this implication, arguing that Savulescu fails to establish that intelligence promotes well-being. This paper develops two responses. First, I argue that higher intelligence is likely to contribute to well-being on most plausible accounts. Second, I argue that, even (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  48
    Ben Saunders (2012). Altruism or Solidarity? The Motives for Organ Donation and Two Proposals. Bioethics 26 (7):376-381.
    Proposals for increasing organ donation are often rejected as incompatible with altruistic motivation on the part of donors. This paper questions, on conceptual grounds, whether most organ donors really are altruistic. If we distinguish between altruism and solidarity – a more restricted form of other-concern, limited to members of a particular group – then most organ donors exhibit solidarity, rather than altruism. If organ donation really must be altruistic, then we have reasons to worry about the motives of existing donors. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  74
    Ben Saunders (2010). Fairness Between Competing Claims. Res Publica 16 (1):41-55.
    Fairness is a central, but under-theorized, notion in moral and political philosophy. This paper makes two contributions. Firstly, it criticizes Broome’s seminal account of fairness in Proc Aristotelian Soc 91:87–101, showing that there are problems with restricting fairness to a matter of relative satisfaction and holding that it does not itself require the satisfaction of the claims in question. Secondly, it considers the justification of lotteries to resolve cases of ties between competing claims, which Broome claims as support for his (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8.  9
    Ben Saunders (2015). Why Procreative Preferences May Be Moral – And Why It May Not Matter If They Aren't. Bioethics 29 (7):499-506.
    There has been much argument over whether procreative selection is obligatory or wrong. Rebecca Bennett has recently challenged the assumption that procreative choices are properly moral choices, arguing that these views express mere preferences. This article challenges Bennett's view on two fronts. First, I argue that the Non-Identity Problem does not show that there cannot be harmless wrongs – though this would require us to abandon the intuitively attractive ‘person-affecting principle’, that may be a lesser cost than abandoning some more (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  47
    Ben Saunders (2008). The Equality of Lotteries. Philosophy 83 (3):359-372.
    Lotteries have long been used to resolve competing claims, yet their recent implementation to allocate school places in Brighton and Hove, England led to considerable public outcry. This article argues that, given appropriate selection is impossible when parties have equal claims, a lottery is preferable to an auction because it excludes unjust influences. Three forms of contractualism are discussed and the fairness of lotteries is traced to the fact that they give each person an equal chance, as a surrogate for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  10.  37
    A. C. Paseau & Ben Saunders (2015). Fairness and Aggregation. Utilitas 27 (4):460-469.
    Sometimes, two unfair distributions cancel out in aggregate. Paradoxically, two distributions each of which is fair in isolation may give rise to aggregate unfairness. When assessing the fairness of distributions, it therefore matters whether we assess transactions piecemeal or focus only on the overall result. This piece illustrates these difficulties for two leading theories of fairness before offering a formal proof that no non-trivial theory guarantees aggregativity. This is not intended as a criticism of any particular theory, but as a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  88
    Ben Saunders (2010). J. S. Mill's Conception of Utility. Utilitas 22 (1):52-69.
    Mill's most famous departure from Bentham is his distinction between higher and lower pleasures. This article argues that quality and quantity are independent and irreducible properties of pleasures that may be traded off against each other higher pleasures’ lexically dominate lower ones, and that the distinction is compatible with hedonism. I show how this interpretation not only makes sense of Mill but allows him to respond to famous problems, such as Crisp's Haydn and the oyster and Nozick's experience machine.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  10
    B. A. C. Saunders & J. van Brakel (1997). Colour: An Exosomatic Organ? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):212-220.
    Sections R1 to R3 attempt to take the sting out of hostile commentaries. Sections R4 to R5 engage Berlin and Kay and the World Color Survey to correct the record. Section R6 begins the formulation of a new theory of colour as an engineering project with a technological developmental trajectory. It is recommended that the colour space be abandoned.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  13.  86
    Ben Saunders (2009). A Defence of Weighted Lotteries in Life Saving Cases. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (3):279 - 290.
    The three most common responses to Taurek’s ‘numbers problem’ are saving the greater number, equal chance lotteries and weighted lotteries. Weighted lotteries have perhaps received the least support, having been criticized by Scanlon What We Owe to Each Other ( 1998 ) and Hirose ‘Fairness in Life and Death Cases’ ( 2007 ). This article considers these objections in turn, and argues that they do not succeed in refuting the fairness of a weighted lottery, which remains a potential solution to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  14
    B. Saunders (2015). Is Procreative Beneficence Obligatory? Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):175-178.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Ben Saunders (2010). Democracy, Political Equality, and Majority Rule. Ethics 121 (1):148-177.
    Democracy is commonly associated with political equality and/or majority rule. This essay shows that these three ideas are conceptually separate, so the transition from any one to another stands in need of further substantive argument, which is not always adequately given. It does this by offering an alternative decision-making mechanism, called lottery voting, in which all individuals cast votes for their preferred options but, instead of these being counted, one is randomly selected and that vote determines the outcome. This procedure (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  48
    Ben Saunders (2010). Why Majority Rule Cannot Be Based Only on Procedural Equality. Ratio Juris 23 (1):113-122.
  17.  45
    Ben Saunders (2010). Sex Discrimination, Gender Balance, Justice and Publicity in Admissions. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (1):59-71.
    This paper examines the problem of selecting a number of candidates to receive a good (admission) from a pool in which there are more qualified applicants than places. I observe that it is rarely possible to order all candidates according to some relevant criterion, such as academic merit, since these standards are inevitably somewhat vague. This means that we are often faced with the task of making selections between near-enough equal candidates. I survey one particular line of response, which says (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  32
    B. Saunders (2012). Combining Lotteries and Voting. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (4):347-351.
  19.  33
    B. Saunders (2012). Defining the Demos. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (3):280-301.
    Until relatively recently, few democrats had much to say about the constitution of the ‘demos' that ought to rule. A number of recent writers have, however, argued that all those whose interests are affected must be enfranchised if decision-making is to be fully democratic. This article criticizes this approach, arguing that it misunderstands democracy. Democratic procedures are about the agency of the people so only agents can be enfranchised, yet not all bearers of interests are also agents. If we focus (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  2
    Barbara A. C. Saunders (1993). Disenshrining the Cartesian Self. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):77.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  21.  24
    Betty Saunders (1991). The Harsh Morality of the Narnia Stories. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):413-415.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Ben Saunders (2009). Democracy-as-Fairness: Justice, Equal Chances and Lotteries. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 2 (1):154-156.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  83
    B. Saunders (2012). Opt-Out Organ Donation Without Presumptions. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (2):69-72.
    This paper defends an ‘opt-out’ scheme for organ procurement, by distinguishing this system from ‘presumed consent’ (which the author regards as an erroneous justification of it). It, first, stresses the moral importance of increasing the supply of organs and argues that making donation easier need not conflict with altruism. It then goes on to explore one way that donation can be increased, namely by adopting an opt-out system, in which cadaveric organs are used unless the deceased (or their family) registered (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  12
    B. Saunders (2010). How to Teach Moral Theories in Applied Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (10):635-638.
    Recent discussion has focused on whether or not to teach moral theories, and, if yes, to what extent. In this piece the author argues that the criticisms of teaching moral theories raised by Rob Lawlor should lead us to reconsider not whether but how to teach moral theories. It seems that most of the problems Lawlor identifies derive from an uncritical, theory-led approach to teaching. It is suggested that we might instead start by discussing practical cases or the desiderata of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  27
    Ben Saunders (2011). Immigration, Rights and Democracy. Theoria 58 (129):58-77.
    Arash Abizadeh has recently argued that political communities have no right to close their borders unilaterally, since by doing so they subject outsiders to coercion which lacks democratic justification. His conclusion is that any legitimate regime of border controls must be justified to outsiders. David Miller has sought to defend closed borders by distinguishing between coercion and prevention and arguing that the latter does not require democratic justification. This paper explores a different route, arguing firstly that the requirements of democracy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  77
    B. A. C. Saunders & Jaap Van Brakel (2002). The Trajectory of Color. Perspectives on Science 10 (3):302-355.
    : According to a consensus of psycho-physiological and philosophical theories, color sensations (or qualia) are generated in a cerebral "space" fed from photon-photoreceptor interaction (producing "metamers") in the retina of the eye. The resulting "space" has three dimensions: hue (or chroma), saturation (or "purity"), and brightness (lightness, value or intensity) and (in some versions) is further structured by primitive or landmark "colors"—usually four, or six (when white and black are added to red, yellow, green and blue). It has also been (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  5
    B. Saunders (forthcoming). Understanding Consent: A Response to MacKay. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Barbara Saunders & Jaap Van Brakel (eds.) (2002). Theories, Technologies, Instrumentalities of Color: Anthropological and Historiographic Perspectives. University Press of America.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  66
    Ben Saunders (2009). The Constitution of Equality: Democratic Authority and its Limits – Thomas Christiano. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (236):566-568.
  30.  6
    Ben Saunders (2015). Book Review: Democracy and Disenfranchisement: The Morality of Electoral Exclusions, by Claudio López-Guerra. [REVIEW] Political Theory 43 (6):858-862.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  48
    Ben Saunders (2010). Barbara Goodwin, Justice by Lottery. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (4):553-556.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  32
    Ben Saunders (2011). Democratic Legitimacy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):472-475.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  24
    B. Saunders (2012). Democracy and Moral Conflict, by Robert B. Talisse. Mind 120 (480):1312-1315.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  27
    Ben Saunders (2011). Reinterpreting the Qualitative Hedonism Advanced by J.S. Mill. Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (2):187-201.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  39
    Ben Saunders (2009). Democracy After Deliberation. Res Publica 15 (3):315-319.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  37
    B. A. C. Saunders & J. Van Brakel (2001). Rewriting Color. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):538-556.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  14
    Ben Saunders (2011). Taurek on Numbers Don't Count. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  2
    Barbara Saunders (1998). What is Empirical About Atran's Taxonomies? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):587-588.
    Atran reifies Fodor's metaphor of modularity to create a truth-producing apparatus to generate a priori taxonomies or natural kinds that lock a tautology in place.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  12
    J. Brakel & B. A. C. Saunders (1989). Moral and Political Implications of Pragmatism. Journal of Value Inquiry 23 (4):259-274.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  10
    Barbara Saunders & Jaap van Brakel (2002). Kleur: Een exosomatisch orgaan? Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 64 (2):299 - 324.
    According to the state of the art in psychology and philosophy, colour sensations are located in a 'quality space'. This space has three dimensions: hue (the chromatic aspect of colour), saturation (the 'intensity' of hue), and brightness. This space is structured further via a small number of primitive hues or landmark colours, usually four (red, yellow, green, blue) or six (if white and black are included). It has also been suggested that there are eleven semantic universals — the six colours (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  17
    Barbara Saunders (1999). One Machine Among Many. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):969-970.
    In this commentary I point out that Palmer mislocates the source of the inverted spectrum, misrepresents the nature of colour science, and offers no reason for prefering one colour machine over another. I conclude nonetheless that talk about “colour machines” is a step in the right direction.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  8
    Barbara Saunders & Jaap van Brakel (2002). Kleur: Een exosomatisch orgaan? Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 64 (2):299-324.
    According to the state of the art in psychology and philosophy, colour sensations are located in a 'quality space'. This space has three dimensions: hue , saturation , and brightness. This space is structured further via a small number of primitive hues or landmark colours, usually four or six . It has also been suggested that there are eleven semantic universals — the six colours previously mentioned plus orange, pink, brown, purple, and grey. Against the standard view, we argue that (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  7
    Ben Saunders (2011). Normative Consent and Organ Donation: A Vindication. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):362-363.
    In an earlier article, I argued that David Estlund's notion of ‘normative consent’ could provide justification for an opt-out system of organ donation that does not involve presumptions about the deceased donor's consent. Where it would be wrong of someone to refuse their consent, then the fact that they have not actually given it is irrelevant, though an explicit denial of consent (as in opting out) may still be binding. My argument has recently been criticised by Potts et al, who (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  13
    B. Saunders (2012). Opt-Out Donation and Tacit Consent: A Reply to Wilkinson and De Wispelaere. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (2):75-76.
    In this reply to Wilkinson and De Wispelaere, I argue that an opt-out donation system can be regarded as tacit consent. I first separate the opt-in/opt-out issue from that of the role that the family ought to play. I then argue that what De Wispelaere calls minimal approval-tracking is not obviously necessary and that, even if it were, opt-out schemes can satisfy this requirement.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  6
    Ben Saunders (2011). Tooley on Abortion and Infanticide. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  4
    Ben Saunders (2011). Parfit's Leveling Down Argument Against Egalitarianism. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
  47.  11
    B. A. C. Saunders & J. van Brakel (1999). Colour Word Trouble. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):725-728.
    In reply to Wierzbicka's advocacy of semantic primitives we argue that talk of the semantic primitives repeats the fallacies addressed in the target article at a higher level. In reply to Malcolm's plea for a Wittgensteinian grammar of colour words, we argue that he uses words like “we” and “us” too easily, falling into the trap of “silly relativism.” In reply to McManus's science of word counts, we reiterate the nineteenth-century criticism that this method is based on an illegitimate application (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  4
    Barbara Saunders (2004). Counting Down the Days. Feminist Studies 30:510-521.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  3
    Ben Saunders (2014). Democracy and Future Generations. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  3
    Ben Saunders (2011). Wolff's Argument for the Rejection of State Authority. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 60