Search results for 'Bakhtin, Mikhail' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sergeiy Sandler (2013). Language and Philosophical Anthropology in the Work of Mikhail Bakhtin and the Bakhtin Circle. Rivista Italiana di Filosofia Del Linguiaggio 7 (2):152-165.score: 126.0
    The Bakhtin Circle’s conception of language is very much still alive, still productive, in the language sciences today. My claim in this paper is that to understand the Bakhtin Circle’s continuing relevance to the language sciences, we have to look beyond the linguistic theory itself, to the philosophical groundwork laid for this project by Bakhtin in what he himself referred to as his philosophical anthropology. This philosophical anthropology, at the center of which stands an architectonics of self—other relations, opens the (...)
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  2. Sergeiy Sandler, Bakhtin on Poetry, Epic, and the Novel: Behind the Façade.score: 102.0
    Mikhail Bakhtin has gained a reputation of a thinker and literary theorist somehow hostile to poetry, and more specifically to the epic. This view is based on texts, in which Bakhtin creates and develops a conceptual contrast between poetry and the novel (in "Discourse in the Novel") or between epic and the novel (in "Epic and Novel"). However, as I will show, such perceptions of Bakhtin's position are grounded in a misunderstanding of Bakhtin's writing strategy and philosophical approach. Bakhtin (...)
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  3. Michael F. Bernard-Donals (1995). Mikhail Bakhtin: Between Phenomenology and Marxism. Cambridge University Pres.score: 96.0
    The language theory of Mikhail Bakhtin does not fall neatly under any single rubric - 'dialogism,' 'marxism,' 'prosaics,' 'authorship' - because the philosophic foundation of his writing rests ambivalently between phenomenology and Marxism. The theoretical tension of these positions creates philosophical impasses in Bakhtin's work, which have been neglected or ignored partly because these impasses are themselves mirrored by the problems of antifoundationalist and materialist tendencies in literary scholarship. In Mikhail Bakhtin: Between Phenomenology and Marxism Michael Bernard-Donals examines (...)
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  4. Peter Good (2001). Language for Those Who Have Nothing: Mikhail Bakhtin and the Landscape of Psychiatry. Kluwer Academic/Plenum.score: 96.0
    The aim of Language for those who have Nothing is to think psychiatry through the writings of Mikhail Bakhtin. Using the concepts of Dialogism and Polyphony, the Carnival and the Chronotope, a novel means of navigating the clinical landscape is developed. Bakhtin offers language as a social phenomenon and one that is fully embodied. Utterances are shown to be alive and enfleshed and their meanings realised in the context of given social dimensions. The organisation of this book corresponds with (...)
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  5. Sergeiy Sandler (2012). Whose Words Are These Anyway? In Mykola Polyuha, Clive Thomson & Anthony Wall (eds.), Dialogues with Bakhtinian Theory: Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Mikhaïl Bakhtin Conference. Mestengo Press.score: 90.0
    Is there, according to Bakhtin, such a thing as nobody’s or neutral words? Going over Bakhtin’s writings we might encounter an intriguing variety of answers to this question, ranging from a clear negative – there is no such thing – to a radical positive – all words are neutral, are “nobody’s” – and with a few other variants in between. This paper examines this puzzle both in its own right and from the perspective of what it can teach us about (...)
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  6. Ksana Blank (2007). The Rabbit and the Duck : Antinomic Unity in Dostoevskij, the Russian Religious Tradition, and Mikhail Bakhtin. Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):21 - 37.score: 90.0
    At the core of Dostoevskij's philosophy and theology lies a concept according to which the Truth (Istina) is antinomical: it contains both a thesis and its antithesis without expectation of synthesis. This concept can be traced to Eastern Patristics. After Dostoevskij, the theory of antinomies was elaborated by 20th century Russian religious thinkers such as Pavel Florenskij, Sergej Bulgakov, Nikolaj Berdjaev, Semën Frank, and Vladimir Losskij. Their ideas help us to understand that Dostoevskij's dialogism, made famous in its secular guise (...)
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  7. K. Hirschkop (1985). A Response to the Forum on Bakhtin, Mikhail. Critical Inquiry 11 (4):672-678.score: 90.0
     
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  8. Sergeiy Sandler, The Possibility of Dialogic Semantics.score: 84.0
    This paper outlines and demonstrates the viability of a consistent dialogic approach to the semantics of utterances in natural language. Based on the philosophical picture of language as dialogue, adumbrated by Mikhail Bakhtin and incorporating work in conversation analysis and cognitive-functional linguistics, I develop a method for analyzing both the function and the content of human utterances within a unified philosophical framework. I demonstrate the viability of this method of analysis by applying it to a brief conversational exchange (in (...)
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  9. Mikhail Bakhtin & Sergeiy Sandler (forthcoming). Bakhtin on Shakespeare (Excerpt From “Additions and Changes to Rabelais”). PMLA.score: 84.0
    This is the English translation (with a brief introduction and relatively detailed commentary) of a long excerpt from Mikhail Bakhtin's notes titled "Additions and changes to Rabelais", written in the mid-1940s with reworking his then unpublished manuscript on François Rabelais in mind. This excerpt is most notable for being the only extant text in which Bakhtin discusses and analyses Shakespear's tragedies at relative length—a discussion interesting not only as a reading of Shakespeare, but also as an unusual and revealing (...)
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  10. Walter B. Mead (1986). Mikhail Bakhtin: The Dialogical Principle. By Tzvetan Todorov. The Modern Schoolman 64 (1):69-70.score: 72.0
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  11. Dimitri Nikulin (1998). Mikhail Bakhtin: A Theory of Dialogue. Constellations 5 (3):381-402.score: 72.0
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  12. David Patterson (1985). Mikhail Bakhtin and the Dialogical Dimensions of the Novel. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (2):131-139.score: 72.0
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  13. Filipp Sapienza (2004). Mikhail Bakhtin, Vyacheslav Ivanov, and the Rhetorical Culture of the Russian Third Renaissance. Philosophy and Rhetoric 37 (2):123-142.score: 72.0
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  14. Brian Walker (1995). John Rawls, Mikhail Bakhtin, and the Praxis of Toleration. Political Theory 23 (1):101-127.score: 72.0
  15. Caryl Emerson (1999). Book Review: The First Hundred Years of Mikhail Bakhtin. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 23 (1).score: 72.0
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  16. George Weinschenk (2003). Mikhail Bakhtin. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (2):145-147.score: 72.0
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  17. Hwa Yol Jung (1990). Mikhail Bakhtin's Body Politic: A Phenomenological Dialogics. [REVIEW] Man and World 23 (1):85-99.score: 72.0
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  18. D. M. Khanin (1999). The First Hundred Years of Mikhail Bakhtin. Philosophy and Literature 23 (1):220-223.score: 72.0
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  19. Sung Uk Lim (2011). The Myth of Origin in Context Through the Lens of Deconstruction, Dialogism and Hybridity. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (29):112-131.score: 72.0
    The present study aims to deconstruct the myth of origin, a quest after essential identity, in the context of Japan's colonization of Korea (1910-1945). First, I will contextualize the myth of origin as a particular historical construction of Japanese colonization, which stems from Romantic nationalism in the second half of the 19 th century. Then, I will critique the structuralism, monologism, and colonialism standing behind the myth of origin through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity: (1) Jacques Derrida's deconstruction (...)
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  20. Mary Bittner Wiseman (1986). Tzvetan Todorov, Mikhail Bakhtin: The Dialogical Principle Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (8):404-406.score: 72.0
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  21. Martina Bjorklund (2011). Mikhail Bakhtin. In Marina Sbisà, Jan-Ola Östman & Jef Verschueren (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives for Pragmatics. John Benjamins Pub. Co.. 10--38.score: 72.0
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  22. Natal’ia Konstantinova Bonetskaia (2003). Mikhail Bakhtin's Life and Philosophical Idea. Russian Studies in Philosophy 43 (1):5-34.score: 72.0
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  23. Walker Brian (1995). John Rawls, Mikhail Bakhtin, and the Praxis of Toleration. Political Theory 23 (1).score: 72.0
  24. C. Emerson (2000). Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan The First Hundred Years of Mikhail Bakhtin. The European Legacy 5 (1):121-121.score: 72.0
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  25. Caryl Emerson (1999). Isaiah Berlin and Mikhail Bakhtin: Relativistic Affiliations. Symploke 7 (1):139-164.score: 72.0
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  26. Caryl Emerson (2005). Mikhail Bakhtin and the Dialogic Word in Literary Art. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (1):107-143.score: 72.0
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  27. Ken Hirschkop (1985). A Response to the Forum on Mikhail Bakhtin. Critical Inquiry 11 (4):672.score: 72.0
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  28. Michael Holquist (1983). Answering as Authoring: Mikhail Bakhtin's Trans-Linguistics. Critical Inquiry 10 (2):307.score: 72.0
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  29. Thomas Kent (1994). Clive Thomson, Ed., Mikhail Bakhtin and the Epistemology of Discourse (Critical Studies, Vol. 2 No. 1/2). International Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):148-149.score: 72.0
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  30. G. Mastroianni (2003). The Principles of Mikhail M. Bakhtin. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 23 (1):59-90.score: 72.0
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  31. Susan Petrilli (2013). Sign and Meaning in Victoria Welby and Mikhail Bakhtin: A Confrontation. Semiotica 2013 (196):533-548.score: 72.0
    Journal Name: Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique Volume: 2013 Issue: 196 Pages: 533-548.
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  32. David Roberts (1993). Reviews : Gary Saul Morson and Caryl Emerson, Mikhail Bakhtin: Creation of a Poetics (Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1990). Thesis Eleven 34 (1):186-191.score: 72.0
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  33. George Rousseau (1992). The Perpetual Crises of Modernism and the Traditions of Enlightenment Vitalism: With a Note on Mikhail Bakhtin. In Frederick Burwick & Paul Douglass (eds.), The Crisis in Modernism: Bergson and the Vitalist Controversy. Cambridge University Press. 15--75.score: 72.0
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  34. Flávio Ricardo Vassoler (2011). Dostoevskyan Prolegomena to a Reapproach Between Mikhail Bakhtin'spolyphony and Dialectic. Bakhtiniana 6 (1):59 - 78.score: 72.0
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  35. Flávio Ricardo Vassoler (forthcoming). Prolegômenos dostoievskianos para uma reaproximação entre a polifonia de Mikhail Bakhtin ea dialética/Dostoevskyan prolegomena to a reapproach between Mikhail Bakhtin's polyphony and dialectic. Bakhtiniana.score: 72.0
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  36. E. V. Volkova & S. Z. Orudzheva (2003). Tones and Overtones of the Serious in Mikhail Bakhtin's Philosophy. Russian Studies in Philosophy 43 (1):35-61.score: 72.0
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  37. T. S. Voropaj (2002). Humans in the World of Word-Mikhail Mikhailovich Bakhtin (1895-1975). Filozofia 57 (9):651-666.score: 72.0
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  38. Anthony Wall (2001). On Bringing Mikhail Bakhtin Into the Social Sciences. Semiotica 2001 (133).score: 72.0
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  39. Denis B. Walker (1992). Mikhail Bakhtin: Creation of a Prosaics (Review). Philosophy and Literature 16 (1):180-181.score: 72.0
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  40. Yongxiang Wang (2013). The “Dialogue” Between Victoria Lady Welby and Mikhail Bakhtin – Reading Susan Petrilli's Signifying and Understanding. Semiotica 2013 (196):125-137.score: 72.0
    Journal Name: Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique Volume: 2013 Issue: 196 Pages: 125-137.
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  41. Peter Rule (2011). Bakhtin and Freire: Dialogue, Dialectic and Boundary Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (9):924-942.score: 54.0
    Dialogue is a seminal concept within the work of the Brazilian adult education theorist, Paulo Freire, and the Russian literary critic and philosopher, Mikhail Bakhtin. While there are commonalities in their understanding of dialogue, they differ in their treatment of dialectic. This paper addresses commonalities and dissonances within a Bakhtin-Freire dialogue on the notions of dialogue and dialectic. It then teases out some of the implications for education theory and practice in relation to two South African contexts of learning (...)
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  42. Ruth Coates (2000). The Early Intellectual Careers of Bakhtin and Herzen: Towards a Philosophy of the Act. Studies in East European Thought 52 (4):239-257.score: 54.0
    The article explores common ground shared by Alexander Herzen's `Dilettantism in Science' (1843) and Mikhail Bakhtin's `Towards a Philosophy of the Act' (1919) in the context of the Russian intellectual tradition as a whole. The primary aim is to explore in many ways, perhaps, unlikely affinities between two very different writers in the early stage of their careers. The secondary aim is to explore identifiably `Russian' motifs which may be said to call into question conventional typologies of Russian thought (...)
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  43. Caryl Emerson (2004). On the Generation That Squandered its Philosophers (Losev, Bakhtin, and Classical Thought as Equipment for Living). Studies in East European Thought 56 (2-3):95-117.score: 54.0
    The essay juxtaposes the intellectualpreoccupations and fraught careers of two great20th-century Russian philologist-philosophers,Aleksei Losev and Mikhail Bakhtin. AlthoughLosev''s is the more crippling case, theexternal trajectory of their lives develops inrough parallel (bold, prolific productivity inthe 1920s; arrest and deportation in the1930s; slow reintegration in thepost-Stalinist era; recent revivals, cults,booms, and scandals connected with theirlegacy). What is more, the subject matterthat fascinated them often overlapped (theClassical world, the status of the Word,Dostoevsky). Still, differences overwhelm thesimilarities. The essay concludes withspeculation about (...)
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  44. Raimo Puustinen (1999). Bakhtin's Philosophy and Medical Practice — Toward a Semiotic Theory of Doctor — Patient Interaction. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):275-281.score: 54.0
    Doctor-patient interaction has gained increasing attention among sociologists and linguists during the last few decades. The problem with the studies performed so far, however, has been a lack of a theoretical framework which could bring together the various phenomena observed within medical consultations. Mikhail Bakhtin's philosophy of language offers us tools for studying medical practice as socio-cultural semiotic phenomenon. Applying Bakhtin's ideas of polyphonic, context-dependent and open-ended nature of human communication opens the possibilities to develop prevailing theoretical and empirical (...)
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  45. Fred Evans (2001). Genealogy and the Problem of Affirmation in Nietzsche, Foucault and Bakhtin. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (3):41-65.score: 42.0
    Genealogy is a critical method employed most notably by Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucault. Although he does not explicitly acknowledge it, Mikhail Bakhtin, the Russian linguist and philosopher of language, also uses this method. I examine the way these three thinkers construe both the critical and the affirmative roles of genealogy. The 'affirmative role' refers to what genealogy itself valorizes in exposing the limits of the universal claims it critiques. I identify three tasks of the critical role of genealogy (...)
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  46. Mariela Vargova (2007). Dialogue, Pluralism, and Change: The Intertextual Constitution of Bakhtin, Kristeva, and Derrida. Res Publica 13 (4):415-440.score: 42.0
    In this article I show how the concept of intertextuality as developed by Mikhail Bakhtin, Julia Kristeva and Jacques Derrida can be applied to the political theory of constitutionalism. Such an approach carries with it the valuable democratic idea that all texts in society, including the political constitution, are in a dynamic relationship and reflect social pluralism. By analyzing and comparing intertextual theories, I develop the idea of the constitution as an open and emancipatory interpretative and textual category. I (...)
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  47. Fred Evans (2008). Deleuze, Bakhtin, and the 'Clamour of Voices'. Deleuze Studies 2 (2):178-188.score: 42.0
    This paper pursues two goals. The first concerns clarifying the relationship between Deleuze and the Russian linguist and culturologist, Mikhail Bakhtin. Not only does Deleuze refer to Bakhtin as a primary source for his emphasis on voice and indirect discourse, both thinkers valorise heterogeneity and creativity. I argue Deleuze's notions of ‘deterritorialisation’ and ‘reterritorialisation’ parallel Bakhtin's idea of ‘heteroglossia’ and ‘monoglossia’. Clarifying the relationship between Deleuze and Bakhtin leads directly to the second of my two other goals. I will (...)
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  48. Michael E. Gardiner (2012). Post-Romantic Irony in Bakhtin and Lefebvre. History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):51-69.score: 42.0
    Although several writers have noted significant complementary features in the respective projects of Russian philosopher and cultural theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895–1975) and the French social thinker Henri Lefebvre (1901–91), to date there has not been a systematic comparison of them. This article seeks to redress this oversight, by exploring some of the more intriguing of these conceptual dovetailings: first, their relationship to the intellectual and cultural legacy of Romanticism; and second, their respective assessments of irony (including Romantic irony), and, (...)
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  49. Deborah J. Haynes (1995). Bakhtin and the Visual Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Bakhtin and the Visual Arts is the first book to assess the relevance of Mikhail Bakhtin's ideas as they relate to painting and sculpture. First published in the 1960s, Bakhtin's writings introduced the concepts of carnival and dialogue or dialogism, which have had significant impact in such diverse fields as literature and literary theory, philosophy, theology, biology, and psychology. In his four early aesthetic essays, written between 1919 and 1926, and before he began to focus on linguistic and literary (...)
     
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  50. Valerie Z. Nollan (ed.) (2004). Bakhtin: Ethics and Mechanics. Northwestern University Press.score: 42.0
    The early work of Mikhail Bakhtin is notable for its emphasis on questions in ethics and philosophy. Focusing on these early writings, though also informed by Bakhtin's later works of the early 1970s, the authors in this volume explore the human and prosaic dimensions of ethical and moral dilemmas, whether in the philosophical concerns of the Young Hegelians, the iconography and implicit doctrine of Christian redemption in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, in testimonial accounts of political martyrs in Latin America, (...)
     
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