24 found
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  1. Barbara Applebaum (2003). Social Justice, Democratic Education and the Silencing of Words That Wound. Journal of Moral Education 32 (2):151-162.
    Classrooms and schools represent a "culture of power" to the extent that they mirror unjust social relations that exist in the larger society. Progressive educators committed to social justice seek to disrupt those social relations in the classroom that function to silence marginalised students, but neutralising those who attempt to reassert power is problematic. This paper investigates the questions: is it ever justified to use power to interrupt power? Does all silencing subjugate? Arguments for and against the censorship of teachers (...)
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  2.  29
    Robin Barrow, Barbara Applebaum, Bruce Maxwell & Roland Reicltenbach (2005). By Maria Del Pilar Zeledén and Maria Rosa Buxarrais) Rflvlfiwfid By. Journal of Moral Education 34 (3).
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  3.  11
    Barbara Applebaum (2013). Vigilance as a Response to White Complicity. Educational Theory 63 (1):17-34.
    Calls for vigilance have been a recurrent theme in social justice education. Scholars making this call note that vigilance involves a continuous attentiveness, that it presumes some type of criticality, and that it is transformative. In this essay Barbara Applebaum expands upon some of these attributes and calls attention to three particular features of vigilance that, while they may be alluded to in the aforementioned discussions, are rarely made explicit. These three features are critique, staying in the anxiety of critique, (...)
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  4.  41
    Barbara Applebaum (2005). In the Name of Morality: Moral Responsibility, Whiteness and Social Justice Education. Journal of Moral Education 34 (3):277-290.
    This paper argues that the ?traditional conception of moral responsibility? authorizes and supports denials of white complicity. First, what is meant by the ?traditional conception of moral responsibility? is delineated and the enabling and disenabling characteristics of this view are highlighted. Then, three seemingly good, antiracist discourses that white students often engage in are discussed ? the discourse of colour?blindness, the discourse of meritocracy and the discourse of individual choice ? and analysed to show how they are all grounded in (...)
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  5.  5
    Barbara Applebaum (2007). White Complicity and Social Justice Education: Can One Be Culpable Without Being Liable? Educational Theory 57 (4):453-467.
    In part of an ongoing study of white complicity, moral responsibility, and moral agency in social justice education, Barbara Applebaum asks in this essay what model or models of moral responsibility can help white students recognize their white complicity and which models of moral responsibility obscure such acknowledgment. To address this question, she explores the concept of white complicity and its relation to racism and raises some compelling conceptual and pedagogical questions. Then she reviews a recent analysis of the concept (...)
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  6.  17
    Barbara Applebaum (2008). Voice - for Whose Benefit? Identity - at Whose Expense? Changing Minds - at What Cost? A Rejoinder to Jackson. Journal of Moral Education 37 (2):239-243.
    Applebaum acknowledges the importance of the questions that Jackson raises and also clarifies some claims that Jackson mistakenly attributes to her. Applebaum queries Jackson's identification of ?unreasonableness? with ignorance and cautions that a concern for students becoming ?reasonable? must not preclude the possible costs to those who must endure the education of the privileged.
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  7.  5
    Barbara Applebaum (2004). Social Justice Education, Moral Agency, and the Subject of Resistance. Educational Theory 54 (1):1-1.
    This paper explores the concept of white complicity and provides illustrations of how traditional conceptions of moral agency support the denial of such complicity. Judith Butler's conception of subjectivity is then examined with the aim of assessing its usefulness as a foundation for social justice pedagogy. Butler's conception of subjectivity is of interest because it offers insights into how dominant group identities are unintentionally complicit in the perpetuation of hegemonic social norms. While Butler's conception of subjectivity is shown to be (...)
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  8.  25
    Barbara Applebaum (1997). Good Liberal Intentions Are Not Enough! Racism, Intentions and Moral Responsibility. Journal of Moral Education 26 (4):409-421.
    Abstract The relationship of intention to moral responsibility in contemporary notions of racism is explored. It is argued that, although the moral import of efforts to reveal and recognise dominance in western society is to be lauded, the peripheral role attributed to intentions in ascriptions of racism can be counterproductive to the aim of helping dominant group members acknowledge their embeddedness in a culture which oppresses others.
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  9.  3
    Rebecca Glover, Barbara Applebaum, William F. Arsenio, Joan Goodman, John Gibbs, James Arthur, Dan Hart, Hae-Jeong Baek, Roger Bergman & Richard Hayes (2004). JME Referees in 2003. Journal of Moral Education 33 (2):231-232.
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  10.  10
    Barbara Applebaum (2001). Raising Awareness of Dominance: Does Recognising Dominance Mean One has to Dismiss the Values of the Dominant Group? Journal of Moral Education 30 (1):55-70.
    Social justice education, it is argued, is a form of and essential to moral education, especially for dominant group affiliated students. Under this condition, one of the essential goals of social justice education must be raising an awareness of dominance. The meaning of dominance is discussed and it is argued that overly simplistic conceptions of what dominance means may lead to the mistaken assumption that in order to recognise one's own dominance, one has to reject the values of the dominant (...)
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  11.  5
    Barbara Applebaum (1995). Creating a Trusting Atmosphere in the Classroom. Educational Theory 45 (4):443-452.
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  12.  6
    Rania Al Nakib, Barbara Applebaum, Annice Barber, Jason Barr, Daniel Bell, Roger Bergman, Marvin Berkowitz, Antonio Bernal Guerrero, Thomas Bienengräber & Melinda Bier (2011). Journal of Moral Education Referees In. Journal of Moral Education 40 (2):273-276.
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  13.  11
    Barbara Applebaum (2002). Teaching Applied Ethics, Critical Theory, and “Having to Brush One's Teeth”. Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):27-40.
    This paper argues that to study and teach ethics without due attention to feminism and other relevant aspects of critical theory is to be ethically handicapped. In arguing for this point, the author explains the key components of critical theory, how critical theory augments critical thinking insofar as the former points out certain limitations of exclusive abstract analysis, and how a consideration of critical theory can aid teachers to achieve their learning objectives. In illustrating these points, the paper points to (...)
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  14.  14
    Barbara Applebaum (1996). Moral Paralysis and the Ethnocentric Fallacy. Journal of Moral Education 25 (2):185-199.
    Abstract One of the greatest achievements ensuing from contemporary commitments to multiculturalism has been a greater awareness of the indignity of ethnocentrism. However, an inadequate understanding of how to avoid ethnocentrism may lead to moral paralysis. In this paper, it is argued that extolling the voices of others does not necessarily imply denigrating our own and that respecting diversity is the only genuine antidote for ethnocentrism.
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  15.  4
    Barbara Applebaum (2013). Turning the Gaze on Whiteness: Opacity, Dispossession and the Call to Tarry. Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (1):1-4.
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  16.  10
    Barbara Applebaum (2006). Race Ignore-Ance, Colortalk, and White Complicity: White is…White Isn't1. Educational Theory 56 (3):345-362.
    In this review essay, Barbara Applebaum uses white complicity as a framework for discussing three books: Mica Pollock’s Colormute: Race Talk Dilemmas in an American School, Debra Van Ausdale and Joe R. Feagin’s The First R: How Children Learn Race and Racist, and Virginia Lea and Judy Helfand’s Identifying Race and Transforming Whiteness in the Classroom. She explains the notion of white complicity and discusses some of the deep philosophical questions involving moral responsibility and agency that arise when one acknowledges (...)
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  17.  2
    Barbara Applebaum, Andrew Blair, Don Cochrane, Mike Cross, Deborah K. Deemer, John Gibbs, Mark Halstead, Charles Helwig, Marilyn Johnson & Lesley Kendall (1994). JME Referees in 1993. Journal of Moral Education 23 (2):225.
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  18.  1
    Barbara Applebaum, Lyn Brown, Don Cochrane, Mike Cross, Deborah Deemer, Janet Edwards, Ruth Hayhoe, Marilyn Johnson, Patricia King & Romulo Magsino (1993). JME Referees in 1992. Journal of Moral Education 22 (2):183.
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  19.  4
    Rebecca Aanerud, Barbara Applebaum, Alison Bailey, Steve Garner, Robin James, Crista Lebens, Steve Martinot, Nancy McHugh, Bridget M. Newell, David S. Owen, Alexis Sartwell & Karen Teel (2014). White Self-Criticality Beyond Anti-Racism: How Does It Feel to Be a White Problem? Lexington Books.
    George Yancy gathers white scholarship that dwells on the experience of whiteness as a problem without sidestepping the question’s implications for Black people or people of color. This unprecedented reversion of the “Black problem” narrative challenges contemporary rhetoric of a color-evasive world in a critically engaging and persuasive study.
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  20. Michael Adeyemi, Wolfgang Althof, Barbara Applebaum, William Arsenio, Nina Barske, Muriel Bebeau, John Beck, Jennifer M. Beller, Roger Bergman & Marvin Berkowitz (2005). Jme Referees in 2004. Journal of Moral Education 34 (2):259-262.
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  21. Barbara Applebaum (2011). Being White, Being Good: White Complicity, White Moral Responsibility, and Social Justice Pedagogy. Lexington Books.
    Being White, Being Good focuses on white complicity and white complicity pedagogy. It examines the shifts in our conceptualization of the subject, language and moral responsibility that are required for understanding white complicity and draws out implications for social justice pedagogy.
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  22. Barbara Applebaum (2015). Daring to Be Powerful: Remembering Sari Knopp Biklen. Educational Studies 51 (5):420-422.
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  23. Barbara Applebaum (2016). “Listening Silence” and Its Discursive Effects. Educational Theory 66 (3):389-404.
    While researchers have studied how white silence protects white innocence and white ignorance, in this essay Barbara Applebaum explores a form of white silence that she refers to as “listening silence” in which silence protects white innocence but does not necessarily promote resistance to learning. White listening silence can appear to be a constructive pedagogical tool for teaching white students about their implication in the perpetuation of racism. The truth of white students' listening may make it seem as if silence (...)
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  24.  18
    George Yancy, Barbara Applebaum, Susan E. Babbitt, Alison Bailey, Berit Brogaard, Lisa Heldke, Sarah Hoagland, Cynthia Kaufman, Crista Lebens, Cris Mayo, Alexis Shotwell, Shannon Sullivan, Lisa Tessman & Audrey Thompson (2011). The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy. Lexington Books.
    In this collection, white women philosophers engage boldly in critical acts of exploring ways of naming and disrupting whiteness in terms of how it has defined the conceptual field of philosophy. Focuses on the whiteness of the epistemic and value-laden norms within philosophy itself, the text dares to identify the proverbial elephant in the room known as white supremacy and how that supremacy functions as the measure of reason, knowledge, and philosophical intelligibility.
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