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  1. Barbara Baum Levenbook (2006). How a Statute Applies. Legal Theory 12 (1):71-112.
    This essay presents a new theory of statutory application that is superior to two competitors. One of the competitors claims that statutory directives apply to act-tokens fitting the legislature's intention. The other holds that statutes apply to act-tokens that are of the genuine kinds named by the classifying words. These theories solve certain problems badly or not at all, respectively: (1) accounting for the capacity of statutes for epistemic guidance; and (2) avoiding literalism. Both do a limited job of accounting (...)
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  2. Barbara Baum Levenbook (2000). The Meaning of a Precedent. Legal Theory 6 (2):185-240.
    A familiar jurisprudential view is that a judicial decision functions as a legal precedent by laying down a rule and that the content of this rule is set by officials. Precedents can be followed only by acting in accordance with this rule. This view is mistaken on all counts. A judicial decision functions as a precedent by being an example. At its best, it is an example both for officials and for a target population. Even precedents outside of law function (...)
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  3. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1999). Review Essay / Attempts as Attacks. Criminal Justice Ethics 18 (1):52-60.
    R. A. Duff, Criminal Attempts Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996, xxvii + 420 pp.
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  4. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1995). Book Review:Privacy and Social Freedom. Ferdinand David Schoeman. [REVIEW] Ethics 105 (2):421-.
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  5. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1992). Book Review. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 11 (4):449-455.
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  6. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1992). Review: Defender of the Realm: Thomson on Rights. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 11 (4):449 - 455.
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  7. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1985). Harming the Dead, Once Again. Ethics 96 (1):162-164.
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  8. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1984). Harming Someone After His Death. Ethics 94 (3):407-419.
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  9. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1984). On Universal Relevance in Legal Reasoning. Law and Philosophy 3 (1):1 - 23.
    The purpose of this essay is to defend a claim that a certain consideration, which I call unworkability, is universally and necessarily relevant to legal reasoning. By that I mean that it is a consideration that must carry legal weight in the justification of some judicial decisions in every legal system in which (1) all disputed matters of law can be adjudicated, and (2) all judicial decisions are to be legally justified. Unworkability's necessary relevance has important implications for a theory (...)
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  10. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1984). The Role of Coherence in Legal Reasoning. Law and Philosophy 3 (3):355 - 374.
    Many contemporary philosophers of law agree that a necessary condition for a decision to be legally justified, even in a hard case, is that it coheres with established law. Some, namely Sartorius and Dworkin, have gone beyond that relatively uncontroversial claim and described the role of coherence in legal justification as analogous to its role in moral and scientific justification, on contemporary theories. In this, I argue, they are mistaken. Specifically, coherence in legal justification is sometimes specific to a branch (...)
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  11. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1982). Bibliographical Essay / Criminal Harm. Criminal Justice Ethics 1 (1):48-53.
  12. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1982). Review Essay / A Theory of Criminal Justice. Criminal Justice Ethics 1 (2):60-64.
    Hyman Gross, A Theory of Criminal Justice New York: Oxford University Press, 1979, xviii + 521 pp.
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  13. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1981). Discretion and Dispositive Concepts. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 11 (4):613 - 631.
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  14. T. R. Girill & Barbara Baum Levenbook (1980). The Parti-Resultantness of Requirement: An Explanation That Failed. Philosophical Studies 37 (3):237 - 249.
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  15. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1980). D-Theories, Discretion, and the Justification of Adjudication. Social Theory and Practice 5 (3-4):331-345.
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  16. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1980). On Preferential Admission. Journal of Value Inquiry 14 (3-4):255-273.
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  17. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1980). That Makes It Worse. The Monist 63 (2):228-245.
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