4 found
Sort by:
  1. Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis (2005). Evolutionary Sleight of Hand: Then, They Saw It; Now We Don't. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):137-138.
    Arbib's gestural-origins theory does not tell us why or how a subsequent switch to vocal language occurred, and shows no systematic concern with the signalling affordances or constraints of either medium. Our frame/content theory, in contrast, offers both a vocal origin in the invention of kinship terms in a baby-talk context and an explanation for the structure of the currently favored medium.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis (2005). The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech: A Comparison with a Gestural-Origins Alternative. Interaction Studies 6 (2):173-199.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis (2004). Baby Talk and the Emergence of First Words. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):517-518.
    Words denoting “mother” in baby talk and in languages usually include nasal sounds, supporting Falk's suggestion that infant nasalized demand vocalizations might have motivated a first word. The linguistic contrast between maternal terms and paternal terms, which favor oral consonants, and the simple phonetic patterns of parental terms in both baby talk and languages also suggest parental terms could have been first words.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis (2003). Message and Medium: Lowly and Action-Related Origins. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):296-297.
    Hurford presents a much-needed lowly origins scenario for the evolution of conceptual precursors to lexical items. But more is still needed on action, regarding both the message level of lexical concepts and the medium. We summarize our complementary action-based lowly origins (frame/content) scenario for the vocal auditory medium of language, which, like Hurford's scenario, is anchored in a phylogenetically old neurological dichotomy.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation