Search results for 'Barbara Lloyd' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Casper Bruun Jensen, Barbara Herrnstein Smith, G. E. R. Lloyd, Martin Holbraad, Andreas Roepstorff, Isabelle Stengers, Helen Verran, Steven D. Brown, Brit Ross Winthereik, Marilyn Strathern, Bruce Kapferer, Annemarie Mol, Morten Axel Pedersen, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Matei Candea, Debbora Battaglia & Roy Wagner (2011). Introduction: Contexts for a Comparative Relativism. Common Knowledge 17 (1):1-12.score: 300.0
    This introduction to the Common Knowledge symposium titled “Comparative Relativism” outlines a variety of intellectual contexts where placing the unlikely companion terms comparison and relativism in conjunction offers analytical purchase. If comparison, in the most general sense, involves the investigation of discrete contexts in order to elucidate their similarities and differences, then relativism, as a tendency, stance, or working method, usually involves the assumption that contexts exhibit, or may exhibit, radically different, incomparable, or incommensurable traits. Comparative studies are required to (...)
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  2. Barbara Bloom Lloyd & John Gay (eds.) (1981). Universals of Human Thought: Some African Evidence. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    This book was originally published in 1981 and the theme of universals attracted a great deal of attention in the decade preceding publication.
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  3. Barbara Lloyd (1976). Culture and Colour Coding. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 10:140-161.score: 240.0
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  4. Peter Lloyd & Innes Crellin (1996). Crellin/Lloyd Feud Continued. Philosophy Now 15:26-26.score: 120.0
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  5. G. E. R. Lloyd (2011). Multidimensional Reality. Common Knowledge 17 (1):27-30.score: 120.0
    This piece is a response to Barbara Herrnstein Smith's article, “The Chimera of Relativism: A Tragicomedy,” in the Common Knowledge symposium on “comparative relativism.” The theme is complexity—as distinct from simple contrast or binarism of any kind—similarities as well as differences are observed in ancient Chinese and ancient Greek responses to cultural difference; also the significantly different views of these matters among the Greek philosophers. In the same vein, discussing studies of cultural/linguistic variability or counterclaimed universality among humans in (...)
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  6. Lloyd of Hampstead & Dennis Lloyd (1985). Lloyd's Introduction to Jurisprudence. Stevens.score: 120.0
     
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  7. Rosalind Thomas (2010). Horodotus Books 1–4 (D.) Asheri, (A.) Lloyd, (A.) Corcella A Commentary on Herodotus Books I–IV. Edited by Oswyn Murray and Alfonso Moreno with a Contribution by Maria Brosius. Translated by Barbara Graziosi, Matteo Rossetti, Carlotta Dus and Vanessa Cazzato. Pp. Lxxii + 721, Ills, Maps. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £173. ISBN: 978-0-19-814956-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):27-.score: 72.0
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  8. Gary D. Farney (2008). Asheri, David, Alan Lloyd, and Aldo Corcella. A Commentary on Herodotus Books I–IV. Edited by Oswyn Murray and Alfonso Moreno. With a Contribution by Maria Brosius. Trans. By Barbara Graziosi, Matteo Rossetti, Carlotta Dus, and Vanessa Cazzato. Lxxii+ 721 Pp. 44 Maps and Plans. 8 Black-and-White Figs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cloth, $320. Revision and Translation Of. [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 129:141-144.score: 72.0
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  9. S. A. Lloyd (2011). The Moral Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes: A Reply to Critics. Hobbes Studies 23 (2):180-187.score: 60.0
    S. A. Lloyd responds to critics of her book Morality in the Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes . She seeks to explain the centrality of Hobbes's reciprocity theorem to our understanding of his laws of nature.
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  10. Susan James, Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens (2000). The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions. Hypatia 15 (2):40-58.score: 60.0
    : As a constructive alternative to the exclusionary binaries of Cartesian philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd and Moira Gatens turn to Spinoza. Spinoza's understanding of the body as "in relation" takes the focus of philosophical thought from the homo-geneous subject to the heterogeneity of the social, and the focus of politics from individual rights to collective responsibility. The implications for feminism are radical; Spinoza enables a reconceptualization of the imaginary and the possibility of a sociability of inclusion.
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  11. Moya Lloyd (2005). Beyond Identity Politics: Feminism, Power & Politics. Sage.score: 60.0
    Recent debates in contemporary feminist theory have been dominated by the relation between identity and politics. Beyond Identity Politics examines the implications of recent theorizing on difference, identity and subjectivity for theories of patriarchy and feminist politics. Organised around the three central themes of subjectivity, power and politics, this book focuses on a question which feminists struggled with and were divided by throughout the last decade, that is: how to theorize the relation between the subject and politics. In this thoughtful (...)
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  12. Genevieve Lloyd (1993). The Man of Reason: &Quot;male" and "Female" in Western Philosophy. University of Minnesota Press.score: 60.0
    This new edition of Genevieve Lloyd's classic study of the maleness of reason in philosophy contains a new introduction and bibilographical essay assessing the ...
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  13. Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens (2000). The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions. Hypatia 15 (2):40 - 58.score: 60.0
    As a constructive alternative to the exclusionary binaries of Cartesian philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd and Moira Gatens turn to Spinoza. Spinoza's understanding of the body as "in relation" takes the focus of philosophical thought from the homogeneous subject to the heterogeneity of the social, and the focus of politics from individual rights to collective responsibility. The implications for feminism are radical; Spinoza enables a reconceptualization of the imaginary and the possibility of a sociability of inclusion.
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  14. Genevieve Lloyd (1993). Being in Time: Selves and Narrators in Philosophy and Literature. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Being in Time is a provocative and accessible essay on the fragmentation of the self as explored in philosophy and literature. This original study is unique in its focus on the literary aspects of philosophical writing and their interactions with philosophical content. It explores the emotional aspects of the human experience of time commonly neglected in philosophical investigation by looking at how narrative creates and treats the experience of the self as fragmented and the past as "lost." Genevieve Lloyd (...)
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  15. A. C. Lloyd (1990). The Anatomy of Neoplatonism. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This study proposes that Neoplatonism, while not a modern philosophy, is philosophy in the modern sense. Lloyd analyzes the key structures that underlie the dogmas of the Neoplatonic world picture, including the concept of emanation, the return of the soul to the One, the place of mystical knowledge, epistemology, and Porphyry's theory of predication, and shows that they rest on original but intelligible concepts and arguments.
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  16. Susan James Interviews, Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens (2000). The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions. Hypatia 15 (2):40 - 58.score: 60.0
    As a constructive alternative to the exclusionary binaries of Cartesian philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd and Moira Gatens turn to Spinoza. Spinoza's understanding of the body as "in relation" takes the focus of philosophical thought from the homogeneous subject to the heterogeneity of the social, and the focus of politics from individual rights to collective responsibility. The implications for feminism are radical; Spinoza enables a reconceptualization of the imaginary and the possibility of a sociability of inclusion.
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  17. S. A. Lloyd (1992). Ideals as Interests in Hobbes's Leviathan: The Power of Mind Over Matter. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    S. A. Lloyd proposes a radically new interpretation of Hobbes's Leviathan that shows transcendent interests--interests that override the fear of death--to be crucial to both Hobbes's analysis of social disorder and his proposed remedy to it. Most previous commentators in the analytic philosophical tradition have argued that Hobbes thought that credible threats of physical force could be sufficient to deter people from political insurrection. Professor Lloyd convincingly shows that because Hobbes took the transcendence of religious and moral interests (...)
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  18. Elisabeth A. Lloyd, Richard C. Lewontin & and Marcus W. Feldman (2008). The Generational Cycle of State Spaces and Adequate Genetical Representation. Philosophy of Science 75 (2):140-156.score: 60.0
    Most models of generational succession in sexually reproducing populations necessarily move back and forth between genic and genotypic spaces. We show that transitions between and within these spaces are usually hidden by unstated assumptions about processes in these spaces. We also examine a widely endorsed claim regarding the mathematical equivalence of kin-, group-, individual-, and allelic-selection models made by Lee Dugatkin and Kern Reeve. We show that the claimed mathematical equivalence of the models does not hold. *Received January 2007; revised (...)
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  19. Elisabeth Lloyd, Why Genic and Multilevel Selection Theories Are Here to Stay.score: 60.0
    I clarify the difference between pluralist and monist interpretations of levels of selection disputes. Lloyd has challenged my claim that a plurality of models correctly accounts for situations such as maintenance of the sickle-cell trait, and I revisit this example to show that competing theories don’t disagree about the existence of ‘high-level’ or ‘lowlevel’ causes; rather, they parse these causes differently. Applying Woodward’s theory of causation, I analyze Sober’s distinction between ‘selection of’ versus ‘selection for’. My analysis shows that (...)
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  20. G. E. R. Lloyd (1996). Aristotelian Explorations. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This book challenges several widespread views concerning Aristotle's methods and practices of scientific and philosophical research. Taking central topics in psychology, zoology, astronomy and politics, Professor Lloyd explores generally unrecognised tensions between Aristotle's deeply held a priori convictions and his remarkable empirical honesty in the face of complexities in the data or perceived difficult or exceptional cases. The picture that emerges of Aristotle's actual engagement in scientific research and of his own reflections on that research is substantially more complex (...)
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  21. Dan Lloyd, Art and Science Meet with Novel Results.score: 60.0
    adiant Cool" has the makings of a gripping noir thriller: a missing body, a tough-talking female sleuth and a mustachioed Russian agent mixed up in a shadowy plot to take over the world. But the novel, by Dan Lloyd, a neurophilosopher at Trinity College in Hartford, is also a serious work of scholarship, the unlikely vehicle for an abstruse new theory of consciousness.
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  22. Geoffrey Lloyd (2007). Cognitive Variations: Reflections on the Unity and Diversity of the Human Mind. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Sir Geoffrey Lloyd presents a cross-disciplinary study of the problems posed by the unity and diversity of the human mind. On the one hand, as humans we all share broadly the same anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, and certain psychological capabilities - the capacity to learn a language, for instance. On the other, different individuals and groups have very different talents, tastes, and beliefs, for instance about how they see themselves, other humans and the world around them. These issues are highly (...)
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  23. S. A. Lloyd (2009). Morality in the Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes: Cases in the Law of Nature. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this book, S. A. Lloyd offers a radically new interpretation of Hobbes's laws of nature, revealing them to be not egoistic precepts of personal prudence but rather moral instructions for obtaining the common good.
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  24. G. E. R. Lloyd (2004). Ancient Worlds, Modern Reflections: Philosophical Perspectives on Greek and Chinese Science and Culture. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Geoffrey Lloyd engages in a wide-ranging exploration of what we can learn from the study of ancient civilizations that is relevant to fundamental problems, both intellectual and moral, that we still face today. These include, in philosophy of science, the question of the incommensurability of paradigms, the debate between realism and relativism or constructivism, and between correspondence and coherence conceptions of truth. How far is it possible to arrive at an understanding of alien systems of belief? Is it possible (...)
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  25. Genevieve Lloyd (2013). Enlightenment Shadows. Oxford Univ Pr.score: 60.0
    Genevieve Lloyd presents a new study of the place of Enlightenment thought in intellectual history and of its continued relevance. She offers original readings of a range of key texts, which highlight the ways in which Enlightenment thinkers enacted in their writing--and reflected on--the interplay of intellect, imagination, and emotion.
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  26. G. E. R. Lloyd & G. E. L. Owen (eds.) (1978). Aristotle on Mind and the Senses: Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium Aristotelicum. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The Symposia Aristotelica were inaugurated at Oxford in 1957. They are conferences of select groups of Aristotelian scholars from the UK, USA and Europe, and are held every three years. In 1975 the meeting was held in Cambridge and was devoted to Aristotle's psychological treatises, the De anima and the Parva uaturalia. The members of the conference discussed some of the much debated problems of Aristotle's psychology and broached important new topics such as his ideas on imagination. Dr Lloyd (...)
     
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  27. G. E. R. Lloyd (2009). Disciplines in the Making: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Elites, Learning, and Innovation. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The organisation of higher education across the world is one of several factors that conspire to create the assumption that our own map of the intellectual disciplines is, broadly speaking, valid cross-culturally. Disciplines in the Making challenges this in relation to eight main areas of human endeavour, namely philosophy, mathematics, history, medicine, art, law, religion and science. Lloyd focuses on historical and cross-cultural data that throw light on the different ways in which these disciplines were constituted and defined in (...)
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  28. Peter Lloyd, Berkeley Revisited: The Hard Problem Considered Easy.score: 30.0
    The philosophical mind-body problem, which Chalmers has named the 'Hard Problem', concerns the nature of the mind and the body. Physicalist approaches have been explored intensively in recent years but have brought us no consensual solution. Dualistic approaches have also been scrutinised since Descartes, but without consensual success. Mentalism has received little attention, yet it offers an elegantly simple solution to the hard problem.
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  29. Peter Lloyd, Berkelian Ontology as a Fundamental Approach to Consciousness.score: 30.0
    George Berkeley (1685-1753) put forward a doctrine of mental monism, claiming that reality is fundamentally mental, and the physical world is a derived construct. This paper puts forward a defence of this theory, using a version of Berkeley.
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  30. Elisabeth A. Lloyd (2004). Kanzi, Evolution, and Language. Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):577-88.score: 30.0
  31. Dan Lloyd, Twilight of the Zombies.score: 30.0
    A philosophical zombie is a being indistinguishable from an ordinary human in every observable respect, but lacking subjective consciousness. Zombiehood implies *linguistic indiscriminability*, the zombie tendency to talk and even do philosophy of mind in language indiscriminable from ordinary discourse. Zombies thus speak *Zombish*, indistinguishable from English but radically distinct in reference for mental terms. The fate of zombies ultimately depends on whether Zombish can be consistently interpreted. If it can be interpreted consistently, then zombies remain possible, but no test (...)
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  32. Elisabeth A. Lloyd (1999). Evolutionary Psychology: The Burdens or Proof. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (2):211-33.score: 30.0
    I discuss two types of evidential problems with the most widely touted experiments in evolutionary psychology, those performed by Leda Cosmides and interpreted by Cosmides and John Tooby. First, and despite Cosmides and Tooby's claims to the contrary, these experiments don't fulfil the standards of evidence of evolutionary biology. Second Cosmides and Tooby claim to have performed a crucial experiment, and to have eliminated rival approaches. Though they claim that their results are consistent with their theory but contradictory to the (...)
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  33. Dan Lloyd (2002). Functional MRI and the Study of Human Consciousness. Journal Of Cognitive Neuroscience 14 (6):818-831.score: 30.0
    & Functional brain imaging offers new opportunities for the begin with single-subject (preprocessed) scan series, and study of that most pervasive of cognitive conditions, human consider the patterns of all voxels as potential multivariate consciousness. Since consciousness is attendant to so much encodings of phenomenal information. Twenty-seven subjects of human cognitive life, its study requires secondary analysis from the four studies were analyzed with multivariate of multiple experimental datasets. Here, four preprocessed methods, revealing analogues of phenomenal structures, datasets from the (...)
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  34. Dan Lloyd (2000). Beyond “the Fringe”: A Cautionary Critique of William James. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):629-637.score: 30.0
  35. Elisabeth A. Lloyd (1997). Feyerabend, Mill, and Pluralism. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):407.score: 30.0
    I suggest following Paul Feyerabend's own advice, and interpreting Feyerabend's work in light of the principles laid out by John Stuart Mill. A review of Mill's essay, On Liberty, emphasizes the importance Mill placed on open and critical discussion for the vitality and progress of various aspects of human life, including the pursuit of scientific knowledge. Many of Feyerabend's more unusual stances, I suggest, are best interpreted as attempts to play certain roles--especially the role of "defender of unpopular minority opinion"--that (...)
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  36. Alfred H. Lloyd (1911). Dualism, Parallelism and Infinitism. Mind 20 (78):212-234.score: 30.0
  37. A. C. Lloyd (1970). Aristotle's Principle of Individuation. Mind 79 (316):519-529.score: 30.0
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  38. Dan Lloyd (2000). Terra Cognita: From Functional Neuroimaging to the Map of the Mind. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 1 (1):93-116.score: 30.0
    For more than a century the paradigm inspiringcognitive neuroscience has been modular and localist.Contemporary research in functional brain imaginggenerally relies on methods favorable to localizingparticular functions in one or more specific brainregions. Meanwhile, connectionist cognitive scientistshave celebrated the computational powers ofdistributed processing, and pioneered methods forinterpreting distributed representations. This papertakes a connectionist approach to functionalneuroimaging. A tabulation of 35 PET (positronemission tomography) experiments strongly indicatesdistributed function for at least the ''medium sized''anatomical units, the cortical Brodmann areas. Moreimportant, when these PET (...)
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  39. Dan Lloyd (2002). Studying the Mind From the Inside Out. Brain and Mind 3 (1):243-59.score: 30.0
    Good research requires, among other virtues,(i) methods that yield stable experimentalobservations without arbitrary (post hoc)assumptions, (ii) logical interpretations ofthe sources of observations, and (iii) soundinferences to general causal mechanismsexplaining experimental results by placing themin larger explanatory contexts. In TheNew Phrenology , William Uttal examines theresearch tradition of localization, and findsit deficient in all three virtues, whetherbased on lesion studies or on new technologiesfor functional brain imaging. In this paper Iconsider just the arguments concerning brainimaging, especially functional MagneticResonance Imaging. I think (...)
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  40. Dan Lloyd (2004). Radiant Cool: A Novel Theory of Consciousness. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    An innovative theory of consciousness, drawing on the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl and supported by brain-imaging, presented in the form of a hardboiled ...
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  41. Elisabeth A. Lloyd (1984). A Semantic Approach to the Structure of Population Genetics. Philosophy of Science 51 (2):242-264.score: 30.0
    A precise formulation of the structure of modern evolutionary theory has proved elusive. In this paper, I introduce and develop a formal approach to the structure of population genetics, evolutionary theory's most developed sub-theory. Under the semantic approach, used as a framework in this paper, presenting a theory consists in presenting a related family of models. I offer general guidelines and examples for the classification of population genetics models; the defining features of the models are taken to be their state (...)
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  42. Elisabeth A. Lloyd (1983). The Nature of Darwin's Support for the Theory of Natural Selection. Philosophy of Science 50 (1):112-129.score: 30.0
    When natural selection theory was presented, much active philosophical debate, in which Darwin himself participated, centered on its hypothetical nature, its explanatory power, and Darwin's methodology. Upon first examination, Darwin's support of his theory seems to consist of a set of claims pertaining to various aspects of explanatory success. I analyze the support of his method and theory given in the Origin of Species and private correspondence, and conclude that an interpretation focusing on the explanatory strengths of natural selection theory (...)
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  43. Dan Lloyd (1991). Leaping to Conclusions: Connectionism, Consciousness, and the Computational Mind. In Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (eds.), Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mind. Kluwer. 444--459.score: 30.0
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  44. A. C. Lloyd (1989). Proclus' Commentary on Plato's "Parmenides&Quot;. Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (2):299-300.score: 30.0
  45. Alfred H. Lloyd (1915). Kant and After Kant. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 12 (14):373-381.score: 30.0
  46. Alfred H. Lloyd (1917). Psychophysical Parallelism: A Psychological Episode in History. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 14 (21):561-570.score: 30.0
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  47. Dan Lloyd (1989). Simple Minds. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    Drawing on philosophy, neuroscience, and artificial intelligence, Simple Minds explores the construction of the mind from the matter of the brain.
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  48. Dan Lloyd (1996). Commentary on Searle and the 'Deep Unconscious'. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):201-202.score: 30.0
  49. Alfred H. Lloyd (1901). A Study in the Logic of the Early Greek Philosophy: Pluralism: Empedocles and Democritus. Philosophical Review 10 (3):261-270.score: 30.0
  50. Dan Lloyd (1995). Consciousness: A Connectionist Manifesto. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 5 (2):161-85.score: 30.0
    Connectionism and phenomenology can mutually inform and mutually constrain each other. In this manifesto I outline an approach to consciousness based on distinctions developed by connectionists. Two core identities are central to a connectionist theory of consciouness: conscious states of mind are identical to occurrent activation patterns of processing units; and the variable dispositional strengths on connections between units store latent and unconscious information. Within this broad framework, a connectionist model of consciousness succeeds according to the degree of correspondence between (...)
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