Search results for 'Barbara Morrison' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  13
    J. S. Morrison (1971). Barbara Ehlers: Eine vorplatonische Deutung des sokratischen Eros: der Dialog Aspasia des Sokratikers Aischines. (Zetemata, 41.) Pp. 150. Munich: Beck, 1966. Cloth, DM. 22. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 21 (02):292-293.
  2.  23
    Barbara J. Knowlton, Robert G. Morrison, John E. Hummel & Keith J. Holyoak (2012). A Neurocomputational System for Relational Reasoning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (7):373-381.
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  3.  16
    Barbara Morrison, Dianne Talbot & John K. Swift (1989). Hospital Ethics Committees, Subcommittees, and Ad Hoc Committees: Results of a Survey. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 1 (2):83-87.
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  4. Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young (2005). Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader. Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James Phelan, (...)
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  5. Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.) (2013). Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science / Edited by Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison, and Alison Sharrock. Oxford University Press.
     
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  6. Dear Dr Morrison (2000). Reply to Robert Morrison By Graham Parkes Philosophy East and West Vol. 50, No. 2 (April 2000). Philosophy East and West 50 (2):279-284.
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  7.  10
    Katherine P. Morrison (1999). Origins and Influences. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 3 (1):27-41.
    In 1995 Barbara Held, professor of Psychology , published what is, I think, the first book of its kind - Back to Reality: A Critique of Postmodern Theory in Psychotherapy - a book not about how to do psychotherapy, but about how we should think about doing it. The work engages in a vigorous examination of the recent antirealist trend in psychotherapy and it opens up an important and timelyepistemological debate, but its conclusion - that postmodern (narrative) therapists ought (...)
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  8.  84
    Robert G. Morrison (1997). Nietzsche and Buddhism: A Study in Nihilism and Ironic Affinities. Oxford University Press.
    Morrison offers an illuminating study of two linked traditions that have figured prominently in twentieth-century thought: Buddhism and the philosophy of Nietzsche. Nietzsche admired Buddhism, but saw it as a dangerously nihilistic religion; he forged his own affirmative philosophy in reaction against the nihilism that he feared would overwhelm Europe. Morrison shows that Nietzsche's influential view of Buddhism was mistaken, and that far from being nihilistic, it has notable and perhaps surprising affinities with Nietzsche's own project of the (...)
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  9. Linda Joy Morrison (2005). Talking Back to Psychiatry: The Psychiatric Consumer/Survivor/Ex-Patient Movement. Routledge.
    Linda Morrison brings the voices and issues of a little-known, complex social movement to the attention of sociologists, mental health professionals, and the general public. The members of this social movement work to gain voice for their own experience, to raise consciousness of injustice and inequality, to expose the darker side of psychiatry, and to promote alternatives for people in emotional distress. Talking Back to Psychiatry explores the movement's history, its complex membership, its strategies and goals, and the varied (...)
     
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  10.  6
    J. S. Morrison (1942). Meno of Pharsalus, Polycrates, and Ismenias. Classical Quarterly 36 (1-2):57-.
    At the Editors' request, I have given this paper the final revision which Mr. Morrison has not time to give. This was needed chiefly in II, in the establishment of the stemma, and in the early part of IV. In these parts Mr. Morrison must not be held responsible for the details, though I have endeavoured to give his conclusions. In II the credit is his for the identification of the sororis filius in Quintilian, Inst. Or. xi. 2. (...)
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  11. Robert G. Morrison (1997). Nietzsche and Buddhism: A Study in Nihilism and Ironic Affinities. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Robert Morrison offers an illuminating study of two linked traditions that have figured prominantly in twentieth-century thought: Buddhism and the philosophy of Nietzsche. Morrison shows that Nietzsche's influential view of Buddhism was mistaken, and that far from being nihilistic, it has notable and perhaps surprising affinities with Nietzsche's own project of the transvaluation of all values.
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  12.  7
    John Ross Morrison & David Anderson, Visual Noise Due to Quantum Indeterminacies.
    We establish that, due to certain quantum indeterminacies, there must be foundational colours that do not reliably cause any particular experience. This report functions as an appendix to Morrison's "Colour in a Physical World.".
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  13.  2
    C. Howard Morrison (2012). Naturalism. Modern Schoolman 4 (7):108-110.
    After pointing out the great influence of this philosophical system, Mr. Morrison looser no time in going to the heart of it. He is will qualified forth is study, having spent much time in reading and discussion concerning ths great proponents of the system.
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  14.  1
    Marlene Morrison (1995). Researching Food Consumers in School. Recipes for Concern. Educational Studies 21 (2):239-263.
    A project based at the Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research at the University of Warwick is currently exploring the formal and informal ways in which children and adults experience food and eating in schools. Conducted by Burgess & Morrison during 1993‐94, the project forms part of the Economic and Social Research Council's Nation's Diet Initiative. Using data from the project, this paper explores food choice and consumption in relation to the institutional dynamics of two English secondary schools (...)
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  15.  4
    Jeffry H. Morrison (2005). John Witherspoon and the Founding of the American Republic. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Jeffry H. Morrison offers readers the first comprehensive look at the political thought and career of John Witherspoon—a Scottish Presbyterian minister and one of America’s most influential and overlooked founding fathers. Witherspoon was an active member of the Continental Congress and was the only clergyman both to sign the Declaration of Independence and to ratify the federal Constitution. During his tenure as president of the College of New Jersey at Princeton, Witherspoon became a mentor to James Madison and influenced (...)
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  16. Margaret Morrison (2009). Unifying Scientific Theories: Physical Concepts and Mathematical Structures. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about the methods used for unifying different scientific theories under one all-embracing theory. The process has characterized much of the history of science and is prominent in contemporary physics; the search for a 'theory of everything' involves the same attempt at unification. Margaret Morrison argues that, contrary to popular philosophical views, unification and explanation often have little to do with each other. The mechanisms that facilitate unification are not those that enable us to explain how or (...)
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  17. Margaret Morrison (2011). Unifying Scientific Theories: Physical Concepts and Mathematical Structures. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about the methods used for unifying different scientific theories under one all-embracing theory. The process has characterized much of the history of science and is prominent in contemporary physics; the search for a 'theory of everything' involves the same attempt at unification. Margaret Morrison argues that, contrary to popular philosophical views, unification and explanation often have little to do with each other. The mechanisms that facilitate unification are not those that enable us to explain how or (...)
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  18. Margaret Morrison (2007). Unifying Scientific Theories: Physical Concepts and Mathematical Structures. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about the methods used for unifying different scientific theories under one all-embracing theory. The process has characterized much of the history of science and is prominent in contemporary physics; the search for a 'theory of everything' involves the same attempt at unification. Margaret Morrison argues that, contrary to popular philosophical views, unification and explanation often have little to do with each other. The mechanisms that facilitate unification are not those that enable us to explain how or (...)
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  19. Jeffrey Morrison (1996). Winckelmann and the Notion of Aesthetic Education. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Morrison discusses the process of aesthetic education, as defined by Johann Joachim Winckelmann on the basis of his status as arbiter of classical taste and as applied to his teaching of two pupils. Morrison identifies the key features of Winckelmann's treatment of classical beauty and elucidates how Winckelmann taught the appreciation of beauty. He argues that Winckelmann's practice of aesthetic education fell short of his aesthetic theory. Morrison concludes by looking at Goethe's aesthetic self-education, (...)
     
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  20. Margaret Morrison (2007). Where Have All the Theories Gone? Philosophy of Science 74 (2):195-228.
    Although the recent emphasis on models in philosophy of science has been an important development, the consequence has been a shift away from more traditional notions of theory. Because the semantic view defines theories as families of models and because much of the literature on “scientific” modeling has emphasized various degrees of independence from theory, little attention has been paid to the role that theory has in articulating scientific knowledge. This paper is the beginning of what I hope will be (...)
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  21. W. D. Morrison (1896). Philosophical Periodicals. Mind 5 (20):575-579.
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  22. F. N. Hales, W. H. Fairbrother, F. C. S. Schiller, S. H., A. E. Taylor, David Morrison, F. G. Nutt, B. Russell, W. R. Boyce Gibson, C. A. F. Rhys Davids, B. W. & T. Loveday (1903). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 12 (46):255-274.
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  23. W. McD, R. F. Alfred Hoernle, David Morrison, F. C. S. Schiller, Havelock Ellis, H. J. Watt, A. W. Benn & B. Bosanquet (1906). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 15 (59):419-432.
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  24. Alfred W. Benn, Foster Watson, E. V. Slater, A. J. Jenkinson, Henry Sturt, E. F. Carritt, J. A. J. Drewitt & W. D. Morrison (1901). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 10 (39):408-423.
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  25. M. L., David Morrison, W. McD, G. R. T. Ross, A. E. Taylor, P. E. Winter, B. L., B. Russell, Louis Brehaut, G. Galloway, Henry Wodehouse, M. J. & C. A. F. Rhys Davids (1909). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 18 (70):285-309.
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  26.  33
    Margaret Morrison (2002). Modelling Populations: Pearson and Fisher on Mendelism and Biometry. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (1):39-68.
    The debate between the Mendelians and the (largely Darwinian) biometricians has been referred to by R. A. Fisher as ‘one of the most needless controversies in the history of science’ and by David Hull as ‘an explicable embarrassment’. The literature on this topic consists mainly of explaining why the controversy occurred and what factors prevented it from being resolved. Regrettably, little or no mention is made of the issues that figured in its resolution. This paper deals with the latter topic (...)
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  27. Geo Galloway, David Morrison, W. Leslie MacKenzie, F. C. S. Schiller, John Sime, T. B., John Edgar, W. McD, G. R. T. Ross, R. F. A. Hoernle, A. R. Brown & B. Russell (1906). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 15 (58):261-280.
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  28.  38
    Allen Morrison (2001). Integrity and Global Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):65 - 76.
    This paper addresses the role of integrity in global leadership. It reviews the philosophy of ethics and suggests that both contractarianism and pluralism are particularly helpful in understanding ethics from a global leadership perspective. It also reviews the challenges to integrity that come through interactions that are both external and internal to the company. Finally, the paper provides helpful suggestions on how global leaders can define appropriate ethical standards for themselves and their organizations.
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  29. Herbert L. Stewart, Joseph Rickaby, G. Galloway, J. Lewis McIntyre, R. F. Alfred Hoernle, David Morrison & S. C. Haddon (1906). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 15 (60):565-576.
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  30. A. M. Bodkin, T. Loveday, W. McD, W. H. Winch, David Morrison, W. Leslie Mackenzie, George Galloway, T. M. Forsyth, John Edgar & A. W. Benn (1908). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 17 (66):264-285.
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  31.  95
    Maud Lightfoot, W. D. Morrison, F. C. S. Schiller, T. B., John Edgar, M. S., David Morrison, H. Bosanquet, M. S., W. D. Morrison & A. W. Benn (1904). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 13 (50):285-297.
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  32.  46
    J. B. Baillie, John Edgar, A. J. Jenkinson, G. R. T. Ross, W. R. Scott, T. B., David Morrison & R. A. Duff (1904). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 13 (51):425-438.
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  33. Margaret Morrison (1997). Physical Models and Biological Contexts. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):324.
    In addition to its obvious successes within the kinetic theory the ideal gas law and the modeling assumptions associated with it have been used to treat phenomena in domains as diverse as economics and biology. One reason for this is that it is useful to model these systems using aggregates and statistical relationships. The issue I deal with here is the way R. A. Fisher used the model of an ideal gas as a methodological device for examining the causal role (...)
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  34. John J. Morrison (1955). The Existential Import of a Proposition in Aristotelian Logic. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (3):386-393.
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  35.  47
    Margaret Morrison (1990). Theory, Intervention and Realism. Synthese 82 (1):1 - 22.
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  36.  53
    John Sime, R. F. Alfred Hoernle, David Morrison, Allan Menzies, G. Galloway, M. D., M. L. & K. P. (1907). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 16 (61):137-151.
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  37.  45
    Margaret Morrison (2006). Emergence, Reduction, and Theoretical Principles: Rethinking Fundamentalism. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):876-887.
    Many of the arguments against reductionism and fundamental theory as a method for explaining physical phenomena focus on the role of models as the appropriate vehicle for this task. While models can certainly provide us with a good deal of explanatory detail, problems arise when attempting to derive exact results from approximations. In addition, models typically fail to explain much of the stability and universality associated with critical point phenomena and phase transitions, phenomena sometimes referred to as "emergent." The paper (...)
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  38.  41
    Margaret Morrison (2006). Unification, Explanation and Explaining Unity: The Fisher–Wright Controversy. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (1):233-245.
    I argued that the frameworks and mechanisms that produce unification do not enable us to explain why the unified phenomena behave as they do. That is, we need to look beyond the unifying process for an explanation of these phenomena. Anya Plutynski ([2005]) has called into question my claim about the relationship between unification and explanation as well as my characterization of it in the context of the early synthesis of Mendelism with Darwinian natural selection. In this paper I argue (...)
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  39.  36
    Margaret Morrison (2006). Applying Science and Applied Science: What's the Difference? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (1):81 – 91.
    Prandtl's work on the boundary layer theory is an interesting example for illustrating several important issues in philosophy of science such as the relation between theories and models and whether it is possible to distinguish, in a principled way, between pure and applied science. In what follows I discuss several proposals by the symposium participants regarding the interpretation of Prandtl's work and whether it should be characterized as an instance of applied science. My own interpretation of this example (1999) emphasised (...)
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  40.  65
    Margaret Morrison (1990). Unification, Realism and Inference. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (3):305-332.
  41. W. D. Morrison (1892). The Study of Crime. Mind 1 (4):489-517.
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  42.  23
    Keith Morrison (2008). Educational Philosophy and the Challenge of Complexity Theory. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (1):19–34.
    Complexity theory challenges educational philosophy to reconsider accepted paradigms of teaching, learning and educational research. However, though attractive, not least because of its critique of positivism, its affinity to Dewey and Habermas, and its arguments for openness, diversity, relationships, agency and creativity, the theory is not without its difficulties. These are seen to lie in terms of complexity theory's nature, status, methodology, utility and contribution to the philosophy of education, being a descriptive theory that is easily misunderstood as a prescriptive (...)
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  43. H. N., W. McD, Sidney Ball, W. D. Morrison, J. S. Mackenzie, J. Shawcross, B. C. & B. W. (1902). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 11 (43):402-417.
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  44.  73
    Margaret Morrison (2008). Reduction, Unity and the Nature of Science: Kant's Legacy? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83 (63):37-62.
    One of the hallmarks of Kantian philosophy, especially in connection with its characterization of scientific knowledge, is the importance of unity, a theme that is also the driving force behind a good deal of contemporary high energy physics. There are a variety of ways that unity figures in modern science—there is unity of method where the same kinds of mathematical techniques are used in different sciences, like physics and biology; the search for unified theories like the unification of electromagnetism and (...)
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  45.  73
    Margaret Catherine Morrison (2006). Scientific Understanding and Mathematical Abstraction. Philosophia 34 (3):337-353.
    This paper argues for two related theses. The first is that mathematical abstraction can play an important role in shaping the way we think about and hence understand certain phenomena, an enterprise that extends well beyond simply representing those phenomena for the purpose of calculating/predicting their behaviour. The second is that much of our contemporary understanding and interpretation of natural selection has resulted from the way it has been described in the context of statistics and mathematics. I argue for these (...)
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  46.  3
    Jordan Silberman, Wynne Morrison & Chris Feudtner (2007). Pride and Prejudice: How Might Ethics Consultation Services Minimize Bias? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):32 – 34.
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  47.  25
    James C. Morrison (1989). Why Spinoza Had No Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):359-365.
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  48.  18
    Margaret Morrison (1994). Causes and Contexts: The Foundations of Laser Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):127-151.
    One of Nancy Cartwright's arguments for entity realism focuses on the non-redundancy of causal explanation. In How the Laws of Physics Lie she uses an example from laser theory to illustrate how we can have a variety of theoretical treatments governing the same phenomena while allowing just one causal story. In the following I show that in the particular example Cartwright chooses causal explanation exhibits the same kind of redundancy present in theoretical explanation. In an attempt to salvage Cartwright's example (...)
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  49.  65
    Ronald P. Morrison (1978). Kant, Husserl, and Heidegger on Time and the Unity of "Consciousness". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 39 (2):182-198.
  50.  53
    James C. Morrison (1970). Husserl and Brentano on Intentionality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (1):27-46.
    THIS ARTICLE IS AN ATTEMPT TO EXPOUND AND DISTINGUISH\nBRENTANO'S CONCEPT OF "INTENTIONAL INEXISTENCE" (FOUND IN\n'PSYCHOLOGIE VON EINEM EMPIRISCHEN STANDPUNKT') AND\nHUSSERL'S EARLY CONCEPT OF INTENTIONALITY (IN 'LOGISCHE\nUNTERSUCHUNGEN'). THE MAIN PURPOSE IS TO SHOW THAT\nHUSSERL'S PHENOMENOLOGICAL VIEWS ARE VERY DIFFERENT FROM\nAND FAR MORE DEVELOPED THAN BRENTANO'S AND THAT HE REJECTS\nMANY OF HIS CONCEPTS AND DOCTRINES. FIRST, BRENTANO'S\nDESIGNATION OF EIGHT DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS OF MENTAL\nPHENOMENA, THE PURPOSE OF WHICH IS TO DEFINE PSYCHOLOGY, IS\nOUTLINED. THIS IS FOLLOWED BY A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF\nHUSSERL'S CRITICISMS AND REVISIONS, (...)
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