Search results for 'Barbara Oakley' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan & David Sloan Wilson (eds.) (2011). Pathological Altruism. Oxford University Press.
    Pathological Altruism presents a number of new, thought-provoking theses that explore a range of hurtful effects of altruism and empathy.
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  2. Vaibhav Garg (2015). Learning How to Learn with Prof. Barbara Oakley. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (2):5-6.
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  3.  53
    Justin Oakley (2001). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous (...)
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  4. Francis Oakley (2010). Empty Bottles of Gentilism: Kingship and the Divine in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Yale University Press.
    In this book—the first volume in his groundbreaking trilogy on the emergence of western political thought—Francis Oakley explores the roots of secular political thinking by examining the political ideology and institutions of Hellenistic and late Roman antiquity and of the early European middle ages. By challenging the popular belief that the ancient Greek and Roman worlds provided the origins of our inherently secular politics, Oakley revises our understanding of the history of political theory in a fundamental and far-reaching (...)
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  5. Francis Oakley (2015). The Watershed of Modern Politics: Law, Virtue, Kingship, and Consent. Yale University Press.
    The concluding volume of Francis Oakley's authoritative trilogy moves on to engage the political thinkers of the later Middle Ages, Renaissance, Age of Reformation and religious wars, and the era that produced the Divine Right Theory of Kingship. Oakley's ground-breaking study probes the continuities and discontinuities between medieval and early modern modes of political thinking and dwells at length on the roots and nature of those contract theories that sought to legitimate political authority by grounding it in the (...)
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  6. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2005). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous (...)
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  7. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2006). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous (...)
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  8. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2006). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous (...)
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  9.  18
    David A. Oakley (ed.) (1985). Brain and Mind. Methuen.
  10. Judith G. Oakley (2000). Gender-Based Barriers to Senior Management Positions: Understanding the Scarcity of Female CEOs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 27 (4):321 - 334.
    Although the number of women in middle management has grown quite rapidly in the last two decades, the number of female CEOs in large corporations remains extremely low. This article examines many explanations for why women have not risen to the top, including lack of line experience, inadequate career opportunities, gender differences in linguistic styles and socialization, gender-based stereotypes, the old boy network at the top, and tokenism. Alternative explanations are also presented and analyzed, such as differences between female leadership (...)
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  11. Patrick Haggard, P. Catledge, M. Dafydd & David A. Oakley (2004). Anomalous Control: When "Free Will" is Not Conscious. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):646-654.
    The conscious feeling of exercising ‘free-will’ is fundamental to our sense of self. However, in some psychopathological conditions actions may be experienced as involuntary or unwilled. We have used suggestion in hypnosis to create the experience of involuntariness in normal participants. We compared a voluntary finger movement, a passive movement and a voluntary movement suggested by hypnosis to be ‘involuntary.’ Hypnosis itself had no effect on the subjective experience of voluntariness associated with willed movements and passive movements or on time (...)
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  12.  30
    I. T. Oakley (2001). A Skeptic's Reply to Lewisian Contextualism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):309-332.
    In his justifiedly famous paper, “Elusive Knowledge” (Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 74:4, 1996), David Lewis presents a contextualist account of knowledge, which, like other contextualist accounts, depicts sceptical claims as involving application of a higher standard of knowledge than is applied in everyday ascriptions of knowledge. On Lewis’ account, the sceptic’s denials and the everyday ascriptions are made in different contexts, which allows them both to be true. His account gives detailed specification of how contexts are to be determined. My (...)
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  13. Dean Cocking & Justin Oakley (1995). Indirect Consequentialism, Friendship, and the Problem of Alienation. Ethics 106 (1):86-111.
    In this article we argue that the worries about whether a consequentialist agent will be alienated from those who are special to her go deeper than has so far been appreciated. Rather than pointing to a problem with the consequentialist agent's motives or purposes, we argue that the problem facing a consequentialist agent in the case of friendship concerns the nature of the psychological disposition which such an agent would have and how this kind of disposition sits with those which (...)
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  14.  14
    I. T. Oakley (1988). Scepticism and the Diversity of Epistemic Justification. Philosophical Quarterly 38 (152):263-279.
    Sceptics have been accused of achieving their sceptical conclusions by an arbitrary (though usually implicit) redefinition of terms like “justified”, so that, while it may be true that no belief is justified in the sceptic’s new sense of the word, all the beliefs we have taken as justified remain so in the ordinary, standard meaning of the term. This paper defends scepticism against this charge. It is pointed out that there are several sorts of case where someone’s belief may be (...)
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  15.  42
    Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2005). Consequentialism, Complacency, and Slippery Slope Arguments. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):227-239.
    The standard problem with many slippery slope arguments is that they fail to provide us with the necessary evidence to warrant our believing that the significantly morally worse circumstances they predict will in fact come about. As such these arguments have widely been criticised as ‘scare-mongering’. Consequentialists have traditionally been at the forefront of such criticisms, demanding that we get serious about guiding our prescriptions for right action by a comprehensive appreciation of the empirical facts. This is not surprising, since (...)
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  16.  14
    Steve Clarke & Justin Oakley (2004). Informed Consent and Surgeons' Performance. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):11 – 35.
    This paper argues that the provision of effective informed consent by surgical patients requires the disclosure of material information about the comparative clinical performance of available surgeons. We develop a new ethical argument for the conclusion that comparative information about surgeons' performance - surgeons' report cards - should be provided to patients, a conclusion that has already been supported by legal and economic arguments. We consider some recent institutional and legal developments in this area, and we respond to some common (...)
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  17.  65
    S. Oakley (2006). Defending Lewis's Local Miracle Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):337-349.
    Helen Beebee has recently argued that David Lewis’s account of compatibilism, so-called local miracle compatibilism, allows for the possibility that agents in deterministic worlds have the ability to break or cause the breaking of a law of nature. Because Lewis’s LMC allows for this consequence, Beebee claims that LMC is untenable and subsequently that Lewis’s criticism of van Inwagen’s Consequence Argument for incompatibilism is substantially weakened. I review Beebee’s argument against Lewis’s thesis and argue that Beebee has not refuted LMC (...)
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  18.  19
    Patricia L. Smith & Ellwood F. Oakley (1997). Gender-Related Differences in Ethical and Social Values of Business Students: Implications for Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):37-45.
    This study investigated gender-related differences in ethical attitudes of 318 graduate and undergraduate business students. Significant differences were observed in male and female responses to questions concerning ethics in social and personal relationships. No differences were noted for survey items concerning rules-based obligations. Implications for future management are discussed.
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  19. David A. Oakley (1985). Animal Awareness, Consciousness, and Self-Image. In Brain and Mind. Methuen
     
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  20.  59
    Michael J. Shaffer & Jeffery Oakley (2005). Some Epistemological Concerns About Dissociative Identity Disorder and Diagnostic Practices in Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):1-29.
    In this paper we argue that dissociative identity disorder (DID) is best interpreted as a causal model of a (possible) post-traumatic psychological process, as a mechanical model of an abnormal psychological condition. From this perspective we examine and criticize the evidential status of DID, and we demonstrate that there is really no good reason to believe that anyone has ever suffered from DID so understood. This is so because the proponents of DID violate basic methodological principles of good causal modeling. (...)
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  21.  17
    Justin Oakley (1992). Altruistic Surrogacy and Informed Consent. Bioethics 6 (4):269–287.
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  22.  13
    Allen Oakley (2000). Alfred Schutz and Economics as a Social Science. Human Studies 23 (3):243-260.
    Over the years, a number of interpreters with an interest in economics have given some attention the work of Alfred Schutz. As intimated in this literature, the orientation of his delimited thought on economics stemmed from contacts with the Austrian school during his Vienna years. Probably because of this connection, there exists among these interpreters an inclination uncritically to align Schutz with the Austrians' thought. What will be argued in this paper is that in adopting such an uncritical position, each (...)
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  23.  14
    David A. Oakley (1999). Hypnosis and Consciousness: A Structural Model. Contemporary Hypnosis 16:215-223.
  24.  47
    David A. Oakley & Patrick Haggard (2006). The Timing of Brain Events: Authors' Response to Libet's 'Reply'. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):548-550.
  25.  24
    Katrina Bramstedt (2012). Pathological Altruism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):211-212.
    In my work as a transplant ethicist I have always been interested in the topic of altruism. Thus, when a book appeared with the title, Pathological Altruism, I was very intrigued to read it. An exceedingly heavy book, however, arrived in my mailbox, and I admit I was taken aback. But upon reading Pathological Altruism, edited by Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan, and David Sloan Wilson, I was not disappointed.
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  26.  9
    Joanna Santa Barbara (1989). Global Peace as a Professional Concern, III. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):177 - 178.
    This paper proposes that global peace should be a professional concern because the issues are complex and require critical and creative thinking, and because professionals have status enabling them to convey information to empower others. Professionals must examine priorities in society's needs for application of their particular knowledge areas, and must each make their own unique contribution towards a more peaceful, less threatened planet.
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  27.  19
    Seanna Sumalee Oakley (2008). Commonplaces: Rhetorical Figures of Difference in Heidegger and Glissant. Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (1):1-21.
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  28.  16
    Ellwood F. Oakley & Patricia Lynch (2000). Promise-Keeping: A Low Priority in a Hierarchy of Workplace Values. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (4):377 - 392.
    Using a sample of over 700 business people and students, this study tested the premise of promise-keeping as a core ethical value in the work place.The exercise consisted of in-basket planning for layoffs within an organization. Only one of the five employees within the group had been given an express commitment/promise of continued employment for a two year period. The layoffs were being considered six months after the two year promise had been made. All five employees were performing their jobs (...)
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  29.  12
    I. T. Oakley (1972). On an Account of Our Analyticity Judgements. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):124 – 130.
    I discuss and criticise Douglas Gasking’s paper, “The Analytic-Synthetic Controversy” (in the current issue of this journal). Gasking proposes an explanation of our classifying together as “analytic” statements like “Someone is a bachelor if and only if he is an unmarried man”. He proposes that the feature common to the statements that we so classify is that they provide the only “semantic anchor” for a word that does not have, in Quine’s terms, a socially constant stimulus meaning. I argue that, (...)
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  30.  8
    I. T. Oakley (1998). The Invalidation of Induction: A Reply to Pargetter and Bigelow. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (3):452 – 463.
    In this paper, I respond to the paper “The Validation of Induction” by Robert Pargetter and John Bigelow (Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 75:1, 1997), in which the authors propound the thesis that the arguments commonly thought of as good inductive arguments “properly construed, are deductively valid”. I maintain that they have not established this claim, and neither have they established a number of associated but logically independent claims that they make about inductive arguments and inductive inferences.
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  31.  3
    Justin Oakley (2007). Review of Timothy Chappell (Ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (9).
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  32. David A. Oakley & L. C. Eames (1986). The Plurality of Consciousness. In Mind and Brain. Methuen 33-49.
  33.  23
    Francis J. Beckwith (2015). Or We Can Be Philosophers: A Response to Barbara Forrest. Synthese 192 (S1):1-23.
    This article is a response to Barbara Forrest’ 2011 Synthese article, “On the Non-Epistemology of Intelligent Design.” Forrest offers an account of my philosophical work that consists almost entirely of personal attacks, excursions into my religious pilgrimage, and misunderstandings and misrepresentations of my work as well as of certain philosophical issues. Not surprisingly, the Synthese editors include a disclaimer in the front matter of the special issue in which Forrest’s article was published. In my response, I address three topics: (...)
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  34.  3
    Nathaniel C. Comfort (1999). "The Real Point Is Control": The Reception of Barbara McClintock's Controlling Elements. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):133 - 162.
    In the standard narrative of her life, Barbara McClintock discovered genetic transposition in the 1940s but no one believed her. She was ignored until molecular biologists of the 1970s "rediscovered" transposition and vindicated her heretical discovery. New archival documents, as well as interviews and close reading of published papers, belie this narrative. Transposition was accepted immediately by both maize and bacterial geneticists. Maize geneticists confirmed it repeatedly in the early 1950s and by the late 1950s it was considered a (...)
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  35.  11
    W. J. T. Mitchell & Barbara Kruger (1991). An Interview with Barbara Kruger. Critical Inquiry 17 (2):434-448.
    Mitchell: Could we begin by discussing the problem of public art? When we spoke a few weeks ago, you expressed some uneasiness with the notion of public art, and I wonder if you could expand on that a bit.Kruger: Well, you yourself lodged it as the “problem” of public art and I don’t really find it problematic inasmuch as I really don’t give it very much thought. I think on a broader level I could say that my “problem” is with (...)
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  36. M. C. Bradbrook (1975). Barbara Bodichon, George Eliot and the Limits of Feminism.
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  37. Barbara Hall Partee (2004). Compositionality in Formal Semantics: Selected Papers of Barbara Partee. Blackwell Pub..
     
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  38.  24
    Markus Schrenk (2015). Trigger Happy. Ein Kommentar zu Barbara Vetters Potentiality. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 69 (3):396-402.
    This is a review of Barbara Vetter’s book Potentiality: From Dispositions to Modality. Oxford University Press. The first part of Vetter’s book aims to show that the standard semantic and/or metaphysical interpretation of dispositional predicates and/or dispositions fails and that it ought to be replaced by Vetter’s own potentiality metaphysics. This review critically investigates the consequences this view has..
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  39.  13
    Jan Plamper (2010). The History of Emotions: An Interview with William Reddy, Barbara Rosenwein, and Peter Stearns. History and Theory 49 (2):237-265.
    The history of emotions is a burgeoning field—so much so, that some are invoking an “emotional turn.” As a way of charting this development, I have interviewed three of the leading practitioners of the history of emotions: William Reddy, Barbara Rosenwein, and Peter Stearns. The interviews retrace each historian’s intellectual-biographical path to the history of emotions, recapitulate key concepts, and critically discuss the limitations of the available analytical tools. In doing so, they touch on Reddy’s concepts of “emotive,” “emotional (...)
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  40.  4
    Megan Carney (2012). Compounding Crises of Economic Recession and Food Insecurity: A Comparative Study of Three Low-Income Communities in Santa Barbara County. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):185-201.
    Santa Barbara County exhibits some of the highest rates of food insecurity in California, as well as in the United States. Through ethnographic research of three low-income, predominantly Latino communities in Santa Barbara County, this study examined the degree to which households had been experiencing heightened levels of food insecurity since the economic recession and ensuing coping strategies, including gender-specific repercussions and coping strategies. Methods included administering a survey with 150 households and conducting observation and unstructured interviews at (...)
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  41.  21
    J. Wentzel van Huyssteen (2008). Primates, Hominids, and Humans—From Species Specificity to Human Uniqueness? A Response to Barbara J. King, Gregory R. Peterson, Wesley J. Wildman, and Nancy R. Howell. [REVIEW] Zygon 43 (2):505-525.
    In this response to essays by Barbara J. King, Gregory R. Peterson, Wesley J. Wildman, and Nancy R. Howell, I present arguments to counter some of the exciting and challenging questions from my colleagues. I take the opportunity to restate my argument for an interdisciplinary public theology, and by further developing the notion of transversality I argue for the specificity of the emerging theological dialogue with paleoanthropology and primatology. By arguing for a hermeneutics of the body, I respond to (...)
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  42.  41
    Andrews Reath (2011). Will, Obligatory Ends and the Completion of Practical Reason: Comments on Barbara Herman's Moral Literacy. Kantian Review 16 (1):1-15.
    This paper discusses three inter-related themes in Barbara Herman's Moral Literacy norm-constituted power completes’ practical reason or rational agency.
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  43. Stanley Cavell (2000). Beginning to Read Barbara Cassin. Hypatia 15 (4):99-101.
    Stanley Cavell reflects on the writing of Barbara Cassin in light of his interest in interpreting certain philosophers as "philosophically destructive," where this destructiveness may in fact be understood as philosophically creative. Cavell suggests that the writings of Austin and Wittgenstein may be considered in these terms, and speculates on the potential interest these writers might have for Cassin. Cassin's call for a rethinking of philosophy might be seen as uniquely essential to the practice of Austin and Wittgenstein.
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  44.  5
    Melissa S. Anderson (2015). Research Misconduct Policy in Biomedicine: Beyond the Bad-Apple Approach by Barbara K. Redman. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (3):5-9.
    In Research Misconduct Policy in Biomedicine: Beyond the Bad-Apple Approach, Barbara Redman recommends that policy perspectives on research misconduct extend beyond the individual wrongdoer to encompass institutional and broader contexts. She rails against what she sees as a pervasive focus on the misbehavior of individuals that neglects organizational and psychosocial aspects of bad conduct. Her primary targets are the misconduct policies of the U.S. federal government and research institutions. In the U.S., research misconduct policy is grounded in the federal (...)
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  45.  3
    Carla Keirns (1999). Seeing Patterns: Models, Visual Evidence and Pictorial Communication in the Work of Barbara McClintock. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):163 - 196.
    Barbara McClintock won the Nobel Prize in 1983 for her discovery of mobile genetic elements. Her Nobel work began in 1944, and by 1950 McClintock began presenting her work on "controlling elements." McClintock performed her studies through the use of controlled breeding experiments with known mutant stocks, and read the action of controlling elements (transposons) in visible patterns of pigment and starch distribution. She taught close colleagues to "read" the patterns in her maize kernels, "seeing" pigment and starch genes (...)
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  46.  18
    James A. Shapiro (1992). Barbara McClintock, 1902‐1992. Bioessays 14 (11):791-792.
    An appreciation of the life and word of Barbara McClintock, with special emphasis on what made her a unique and visionary scientist. The obituary indicates unappreciated aspects of her work on biological sensing and how organisms restructure their genomes in response to challenges.
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  47.  38
    Edward Erwin (2010). Review Essay: Which Way Psychology? A Discussion of Barbara: Held's Psychology's Interpretative Turn: The Search for Truth and Agency in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (2):291-310.
    Some psychologists have recently tried to develop new approaches to psychology incompatible with both natural-science views of the discipline and basic tenets of postmodernism. In her new book on psychology’s interpretative turn, Barbara Held refers to these thinkers as "middleground theorists" or MGTs. Most of the MGTs reject psychological laws, defend free choice and agency, stress the role of values in psychological inquiry, and argue for a hermeneutical methodology. Some reject scientific realism and embrace epistemological relativism. Both Held and (...)
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  48.  3
    Barbara Cassin (2015). Google Control. Ein Gespräch mit Barbara Cassin. Zeitschrift für Medien- Und Kulturforschung 2015 (2):161-170.
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  49.  9
    C. Fasolt (2001). Voluntarism and Conciliarism in the Work of Francis Oakley. History of Political Thought 22 (1):41-52.
    Francis Oakley has devoted much of his scholarly effort to elaborating three claims about the conciliar theory made early in the last century by John Neville Figgis: that it was rooted in secular precedents ; that it exercised a lasting influence on early modern European political thought ; and that conciliar thinkers transformed principles of medieval constitutionalism into political theory properly speaking . Thanks in large measure to Oakley's work, and in spite of whatever unanswered questions may remain, (...)
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  50.  21
    Jay A. Jacobson & Barbara White (1991). No: Jay A. Jacobson, M.D.(FACP) Barbara White, B.A. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 3 (6):351-353.
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