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  1. Arpan Banerjee & Barry Horwitz (2013). Can Quantum Probability Help Analyze the Behavior of Functional Brain Networks? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):278 - 279.
    Pothos & Busemeyer (P&B) argue how key concepts of quantum probability, for example, order/context, interference, superposition, and entanglement, can be used in cognitive modeling. Here, we suggest that these concepts can be extended to analyze neurophysiological measurements of cognitive tasks in humans, especially in functional neuroimaging investigations of large-scale brain networks.
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  2. Jason Fitzgerald Smith, Allen R. Braun, Gene E. Alexander, Kewei Chen & Barry Horwitz (2013). Separating Lexical-Semantic Access From Other Mnemonic Processes in Picture-Name Verification. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    We present a novel paradigm to identify shared and unique brain regions underlying non-semantic, non-phonological, abstract, audio-visual (AV) memory versus naming using a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Participants were trained to associate novel AV stimulus pairs containing hidden linguistic content. Half of the stimulus pairs were distorted images of animals and sine-wave speech versions of the animal’s name. Images and sounds were distorted in such a way as to make their linguistic content easily recognizable only after being made (...)
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  3. Barry Horwitz, Fatima T. Husain & Frank H. Guenther (2005). Auditory Object Processing and Primate Biological Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):134-134.
    This commentary focuses on the importance of auditory object processing for producing and comprehending human language, the relative lack of development of this capability in nonhuman primates, and the consequent need for hominid neurobiological evolution to enhance this capability in making the transition from protosign to protospeech to language.
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  4. M.-A. Tagamets & Barry Horwitz (2003). Synchronous Dynamics for Cognitive Coordination: But How? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):106-107.
    Although interesting, the hypotheses proposed by Phillips & Silverstein lack unifying structure both in specific mechanisms and in cited evidence. They provide little to support the notion that low-level sensory processing and high-level cognitive coordination share dynamic grouping by synchrony as a common processing mechanism. We suggest that more realistic large-scale modeling at multiple levels is needed to address these issues.
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  5. Barry Horwitz (1999). Neuron Doctrine: Trivial Versus Radical Versus Do Not Dichotomize. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):839-840.
    Gold & Stoljar argue that there are two (often confused) neuron doctrines, one trivial and the other radical, with only the latter having the consequence that non-neuroscientific sciences of the mind will be discarded. They also attempt to show that there is no evidence supporting the radical doctrine. It is argued here that their dichotomy is artificial and misrepresents modern approaches to understanding the neuroscientific correlates of cognition and behavior.
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  6. Barry Horwitz (1998). Using Functional Brain Imaging to Understand Human Cognition. Complexity 3 (6):39-52.
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  7. Barry Horwitz (1995). Regions, Networks: Interpreting Functional Neuroimaging Data. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):360.
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