Search results for 'Barry Spinner' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    John G. Adair & Barry Spinner (1981). Subjects' Access to Cognitive Processes: Demand Characteristics and Verbal Report. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 11 (1):31–52.
    The present paper examines the arguments and data presented by Nisbett and Wilson relevant to their thesis that subjects do not have access to their own cognitive processes. It is concluded that their review of previous research is selective and incomplete and that the data they present in behalf of their thesis does not withstand a demand characteristics analysis. Furthermore, their use of observer-subject similarity as evidence of subjects' inability to access cognitive processes makes tests of their hypothesis confounded and, (...)
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  2. Keith M. Dowding, Robert E. Goodin, Carole Pateman & Brian Barry (eds.) (2004). Justice and Democracy: Essays for Brian Barry. Cambridge University Press.
    While much has been written about social justice, even more has been written about democracy. Rarely is the relationship between social justice and democracy carefully considered. Does justice require democracy? Will democracy bring justice? This volume brings together leading authors who consider the relationship of democracy and justice. The intrinsic justness of democracy is challenged and the relationship between justice, democracy and the common good examined.
     
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  3. Brian Barry (2001). Culture and Equality: An Egalitarian Critique of Multiculturalism. Polity Press.
    All major western countries today contain groups that differ in their religious beliefs, customary practices or ideas about the right way in which to live. How should public policy respond to this diversity? In this important new work, Brian Barry challenges the currently orthodox answer and develops a powerful restatement of an egalitarian liberalism for the twenty-first century. Until recently it was assumed without much question that cultural diversity could best be accommodated by leaving cultural minorities free to associate (...)
     
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  4. Peter Brian Barry (2015). Evil and Moral Psychology. Routledge.
    This book examines what makes someone an evil person and how evil people are different from merely bad people. Rather than focusing on the "problem of evil" that occupies philosophers of religion, Barry looks instead to moral psychology—the intersection of ethics and psychology. He provides both a philosophical account of what evil people are like and considers the implications of that account for social, legal, and criminal institutions. He also engages in traditional philosophical reasoning strongly informed by psychological research, (...)
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  5. Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). Introduction. In Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.), Global Justice. Ashgate
    This volume brings together a range of influential essays by distinguished philosophers and political theorists on the issue of global justice. Global justice concerns the search for ethical norms that should govern interactions between people, states, corporations and other agents acting in the global arena, as well as the design of social institutions that link them together. The volume includes articles that engage with major theoretical questions such as the applicability of the ideals of social and economic equality to the (...)
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  6.  2
    W. G. Runciman & Brian Barry (1967). Political Argument. Philosophical Quarterly 17 (66):87.
    Since its publication in 1965, Brian Barry's seminal work has occupied an important role in the revival of Anglo-American political philosophy. A number of ideas and terms in it have become part of the standard vocabulary, such as the distinction between "ideal-regarding" and "want-regarding" principles and the division of principles into aggregative and distributive. The book provided the first precise analysis of the concept of political values having trade-off relations and its analysis of the notion of the public interest (...)
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  7. Brian Barry (1996). Justice as Impartiality: A Treatise on Social Justice, Volume Ii. Clarendon Press.
    For over twenty years, Brian Barry has been writing on the foundations of a liberal-democratic constitutional order. Standing against the trend towards relativism in political philosophy, Barry offers a contemporary restatement of the Enlightenment idea that certain basic principles can validly claim the allegiance of every reasonable human being.
     
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  8. Brian Barry (1990). Political Argument: A Reissue with a New Introduction. University of California Press.
    Since its publication in 1965 _Political Argument_ has come to be recognized as occupying a key position in the revival of Anglo-American political philosophy. A number of the ideas introduced by Barry have become part of the standard vocabulary, such as the distinction between ideal-regarding and want-regarding principles and the division of principles into aggregative and distributive. _Political Argument_ provided the first precise analysis, still frequently cited, of the conception that political values have trade-off relations; the analysis of the (...)
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  9. Brian Barry (1989). Theories of Justice: A Treatise on Social Justice, Vol. 1. University of California Press.
    What is social justice? In _Theories of Justice_ Brian Barry provides a systematic and detailed analysis of two kinds of answers. One is that justice arises from a sense of the advantage to everyone of having constraints on the pursuit of self-interest. The other answer connects the idea of justice with that of impartiality. Though the first book of a trilogy, _Theories of Justice_ stands alone and constitutes a major contribution to the debate about social justice that began in (...)
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  10. Brian Barry (2014). Culture and Equality: An Egalitarian Critique of Multiculturalism. Polity.
    All major western countries today contain groups that differ in their religious beliefs, customary practices or ideas about the right way in which to live. How should public policy respond to this diversity? In this important new work, Brian Barry challenges the currently orthodox answer and develops a powerful restatement of an egalitarian liberalism for the twenty-first century. Until recently it was assumed without much question that cultural diversity could best be accommodated by leaving cultural minorities free to associate (...)
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  11. Brian Barry (2013). Culture and Equality: An Egalitarian Critique of Multiculturalism. Polity.
    All major western countries today contain groups that differ in their religious beliefs, customary practices or ideas about the right way in which to live. How should public policy respond to this diversity? In this important new work, Brian Barry challenges the currently orthodox answer and develops a powerful restatement of an egalitarian liberalism for the twenty-first century. Until recently it was assumed without much question that cultural diversity could best be accommodated by leaving cultural minorities free to associate (...)
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  12. Peter Brian Barry (2013). Evil and Moral Psychology. Routledge.
    This book examines what makes someone an evil person and how evil people are different from merely bad people. Rather than focusing on the "problem of evil" that occupies philosophers of religion, Barry looks instead to moral psychology—the intersection of ethics and psychology. He provides both a philosophical account of what evil people are like and considers the implications of that account for social, legal, and criminal institutions. He also engages in traditional philosophical reasoning strongly informed by psychological research, (...)
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  13.  33
    Christian Barry & Sanjay Reddy (2008). International Trade and Labor Standards:A Proposal for Linkage. Columbia University Press.
    In this book, Christian Barry and Sanjay G. Reddy propose ways in which the international trading system can support poor countries in promoting the well-being of their peoples.
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  14. Peter Brian Barry (2016). The Fiction of Evil. Routledge.
    What makes someone an evil person? How are evil people different from merely bad people? Do evil people really exist? Can we make sense of evil people if we mythologize them? Do evil people take pleasure in the suffering of others? Can evil people be redeemed? Peter Brian Barry answers these questions by examining a wide range of works from renowned authors, including works of literature by Kazuo Ishiguro, Mark Twain, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, and Oscar Wilde alongside (...)
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  15. Brian Barry (1991). Theories of Justice: A Treatise on Social Justice, Vol. 1. University of California Press.
    What is social justice? In _Theories of Justice_ Brian Barry provides a systematic and detailed analysis of two kinds of answers. One is that justice arises from a sense of the advantage to everyone of having constraints on the pursuit of self-interest. The other answer connects the idea of justice with that of impartiality. Though the first book of a trilogy, _Theories of Justice_ stands alone and constitutes a major contribution to the debate about social justice that began in (...)
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  16. Brian M. Barry (1995). Justice as Impartiality. Oxford University Press.
    Almost every country today contains adherents of different religions and different secular conceptions of the good life. Is there any alternative to a power struggle among them, leading most probably to either civil war or repression? The argument of this book is that justice as impartiality offers a solution. According to the theory of justice as impartiality, principles of justice are those principles that provide a reasonable basis for the unforced assent of those subject to them. The object of this (...)
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  17. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Same-Sex Marriage and the Charge of Illiberality. Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):333-357.
    However liberalism is best understood, liberals typically seek to defend a wide range of liberty. Since same-sex marriage [henceforth: SSM] prohibitions limit the liberty of citizens, there is at least some reason to suppose that they are inconsistent with liberal commitments. But some have argued that it is the recognition of SSM—not its prohibition—that conflicts with liberalism’s commitments. I refer to the thesis that recognition of SSM is illiberal as “The Charge.” As a sympathetic liberal, I take The Charge seriously (...)
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  18. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Wickedness Redux. Philo 14 (2):137-160.
    Some philosophers have argued that the concepts of evil and wickedness cannot be well grasped by those inclined to a naturalist bent, perhaps because evil is so intimately tied to religious discourse or because it is ultimately not possible to understand evil, period. By contrast, I argue that evil—or, at least, what it is to be an evil person—can be understood by naturalist philosophers, and I articulate an independently plausible account of evil character.
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  19. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2009). Responding to Global Poverty: Review Essay of Peter Singer, the Life You Can Save. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):239-247.
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  20. Peter Brian Barry, Evil Actions, Evildoers, and Evil People.
    Typically, philosophers interested in evil have typically been concerned with reconciling (or not) the apparent existence of gratuitous suffering with the existence of an omnipotent and omniscient and supremely loving and caring Deity. Undeniably, ‘evil’ functions as a mass noun: note the intelligibility of asking “Why is there so much evil in the world?” But ‘evil’ sometimes functions as an adjective and is used variously to describe persons, actions, desires, motives, and intentions; Joel Feinberg even speaks of “evil smells.” In (...)
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  21. Peter Brian Barry (2009). Moral Saints, Moral Monsters, and the Mirror Thesis. American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):163 - 176.
    A number of philosophers have been impressed with the thought that moral saints and moral monsters—or, evil people, to put it less sensationally—“mirror” one another, in a sense to be explained. Call this the mirror thesis. The project of this paper is to cash out the metaphorical suggestion that moral saints and evil persons mirror one other and to articulate the most plausible literal version of the mirror thesis. To anticipate, the most plausible version of the mirror thesis implies that (...)
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  22. Christian Barry & Laura Valentini (2009). Egalitarian Challenges to Global Egalitarianism: A Critique. Review of International Studies 35:485-512.
  23.  26
    Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne & Nikolas S. Rose (eds.) (1996). Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism, and Rationalities of Government. University of Chicago Press.
    Despite the enormous influence of Michel Foucault in gender studies, social theory, and cultural studies, his work has been relatively neglected in the study of politics. Although he never published a book on the state, in the late 1970s Foucault examined the technologies of power used to regulate society and the ingenious recasting of power and agency that he saw as both consequence and condition of their operation. These twelve essays provide a critical introduction to Foucault's work on politics, exploring (...)
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  24. Peter Brian Barry (2010). Extremity of Vice and the Character of Evil. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:25-42.
    It is plausible that being an evil person is a matter of having a particularly morally depraved character. I argue that suffering from extreme moral vices—and not consistently lacking moral vices, for example—suffices for being evil. Alternatively, I defend an extremity account concerning evil personhood against consistency accounts of evil personhood. After clarifying what it is for vices to be extreme, I note that the extremity thesis I defend allows that a person could suffer from both extremely vicious character traits (...)
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  25.  65
    Nicholas Barry (2006). Defending Luck Egalitarianism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):89–107.
  26. Peter Brian Barry, Intentional Action, Causation, and Deviance.
    It is reasonably well accepted that the explanation of intentional action is teleological explanation. Very roughly, an explanation of some event, E, is teleological only if it explains E by citing some goal or purpose or reason that produced E. Alternatively, teleological explanations of intentional action explain “by citing the state of affairs toward which the behavior was directed” thereby answering questions like “To what end was the agent’s behavior directed?” Causalism—advocated by causalists—is the thesis that explanations of intentional action (...)
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  27. Peter Brian Barry, Two Dogmas of Moral Psychology.
    I contend that there are two dogmas that are still popular among philosophers of action: that agents can only desire what they think is good and that they can only intentionally pursue what they think is good. I also argue that both dogmas are false. Broadly, I argue that our best theories of action can explain the possibility of intentionally pursuing what one thinks is not at all good, that we need to allow for the possibility of intentionally pursuing what (...)
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  28. Brian Barry (1996). Real Freedom and Basic Income. Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (3):242–276.
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  29.  40
    Ingrid Smithey Fulmer, Bruce Barry & D. Adam Long (2009). Lying and Smiling: Informational and Emotional Deception in Negotiation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):691 - 709.
    This study investigated attitudes toward the use of deception in negotiation, with particular attention to the distinction between deception regarding the informational elements of the interaction (e.g., lying about or misrepresenting needs or preferences) and deception about emotional elements (e.g., misrepresenting one's emotional state). We examined how individuals judge the relative ethical appropriateness of these alternative forms of deception, and how these judgments relate to negotiator performance and long-run reputation. Individuals viewed emotionally misleading tactics as more ethically appropriate to use (...)
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  30. Christian Barry & Pablo Gilabert (2008). Does Global Egalitarianism Provide an Impractical and Unattractive Ideal of Justice? International Affairs 84 (5):1025-1039.
    In his important new book National responsibility and global justice, David Miller presents a systematic challenge to existing theories of global justice. In particular, he argues that cosmopolitan egalitarianism must be rejected. Such views, Miller maintains, would place unacceptable burdens on the most productive political communities, undermine national self-determination, and disincentivize political communities from taking responsibility for their fate. They are also impracticable and quite unrealistic, at least under present conditions. Miller offers an alternative account that conceives global justice in (...)
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  31.  43
    Christian Barry (2005). Applying the Contribution Principle. Metaphilosophy 36 (1-2):210-227.
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  32.  46
    Morris Weitz, L. J. Russell, John Tucker, A. M. MacIver, H. J. Schüring, Jonathan Harrison, W. von Leyden, R. Harré, G. J. Warnock, C. H. Whiteley & B. M. Barry (1962). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 71 (281):124-142.
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  33. Brian M. Barry (1973). The Liberal Theory of Justice. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
     
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  34. Richard I. Sikora & Brian M. Barry (eds.) (1978). Obligations to Future Generations. White Horse Press.
    This reprint of a collection of essays on problems concerning future generations examines questions such as whether intrinsic value should be placed on the preservation of mankind, what are our obligations to posterity, and whether potential people have moral rights.
     
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  35. Brian Barry (1985). Comment on Elster. Ethics 96 (1):156-158.
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  36. Melissa Barry (2007). Realism, Rational Action, and the Humean Theory of Motivation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (3):231-242.
    Realists about practical reasons agree that judgments regarding reasons are beliefs. They disagree, however, over the question of how such beliefs motivate rational action. Some adopt a Humean conception of motivation, according to which beliefs about reasons must combine with independently existing desires in order to motivate rational action; others adopt an anti-Humean view, according to which beliefs can motivate rational action in their own right, either directly or by giving rise to a new desire that in turn motivates the (...)
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  37. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Saving Strawson: Evil and Strawsonian Accounts of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):5-21.
    Almost everyone allows that conditions can obtain that exempt agents from moral responsibility—that someone is not a morally responsible agent if certain conditions obtain. In his seminal Freedom and Resentment, Peter Strawson denies that the truth of determinism globally exempts agents from moral responsibility. As has been noted elsewhere, Strawson appears committed to the surprising thesis that being an evil person is an exempting condition. Less often noted is the fact that various Strawsonians—philosophers sympathetic with Strawson’s account of moral responsibility—at (...)
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  38. Brian Barry (1973). Liberalism and Want-Satisfaction: A Critique of John Rawls. Political Theory 1 (2):134-153.
  39.  40
    Brian Barry (2002). Capitalists Rule Ok? Some Puzzles About Power. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (2):155-184.
    Even if we do not observe those who own or manage capital doing anything, are there nevertheless good reasons for saying that they have power over government? My thesis is that, on any analysis of `power over others' that enables us to say that voters have power over those elected and that consumers have power over producers, we also have to say that those who own or control capital have power over government. Conversely, the reasons that can be given (and (...)
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  40. Brian Barry (1973). John Rawls and the Priority of Liberty. Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (3):274-290.
  41.  79
    Brian Barry (1973). Wollheim's Paradox: Comment. Political Theory 1 (3):317-322.
  42.  46
    Brian Barry (1990). The Welfare State Versus the Relief of Poverty. Ethics 100 (3):503-529.
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  43.  14
    M. J. Goss & D. A. J. Barry (1995). Groundwater Quality: Responsible Agriculture and Public Perceptions. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (1):52-64.
    The chief sources of groundwater contamination on farms come from point sources and diffuse sources. Possible point sources are feedlots, poorly-sited manure piles, septic sewage-treatment systems—all of which can release nitrate, phosphates and bacteria— and sites of chemical spills. Diffuse sources are typified by excess fertilizer leaching from a number of arable fields. The basis of quality standards for drinking-water is discussed in relation to common contaminants present on farms. Samples of drinking-water were collected in 1991–1992 from wells on about (...)
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  44.  17
    John Barry (2007). Environment and Social Theory. Routledge.
    Environment and Social Theory provides a concise introduction to the relationship between the environment and social theory, both historically and within contemporary social theory.
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  45.  60
    Brian Barry (1977). Rawls on Average and Total Utility: A Comment. Philosophical Studies 31 (5):317 - 325.
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  46.  58
    Christian Barry, Redistribution. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  47.  25
    Christian Barry & Kate Raworth (2002). Access to Medicines and the Rhetoric of Responsibility. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):57–70.
    In Africa fewer than 50,000 people—less than 2 percent of the people in need—currently receive ARV therapy. These facts have elicited strongly divergent reactions, and views about the appropriate response to this crisis have varied widely.
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  48.  41
    Brian Barry (1981). Do Neighbors Make Good Fences?: Political Theory and the Territorial Imperative. Political Theory 9 (3):293-301.
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  49.  42
    Brian Barry (1989). The Ownership and Distribution of the World's Natural Resources: A Symposium. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 23 (3):169-170.
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  50.  37
    Patrick Gardiner, C. C. W. Taylor, Leslie M. S. Griffiths, C. J. F. Williams, Richard Campbell, Brian Barry & J. C. Gosling (1968). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 77 (308):602-620.
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