1. Bart D'Hooghe (2010). A Possible Operational Motivation for the Orthocomplementation in Quantum Structures. Foundations of Physics 40 (11):1669-1680.
    In the foundations of quantum mechanics Gleason’s theorem dictates the uniqueness of the state transition probability via the inner product of the corresponding state vectors in Hilbert space, independent of which measurement context induces this transition. We argue that the state transition probability should not be regarded as a secondary concept which can be derived from the structure on the set of states and properties, but instead should be regarded as a primitive concept for which measurement context is crucial. Accordingly, (...)
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  2. Jan Broekaert, Diederik Aerts & Bart D’Hooghe (2006). The Generalised Liar Paradox: A Quantum Model and Interpretation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 11 (4):399-418.
    The formalism of abstracted quantum mechanics is applied in a model of the generalized Liar Paradox. Here, the Liar Paradox, a consistently testable configuration of logical truth properties, is considered a dynamic conceptual entity in the cognitive sphere (Aerts, Broekaert, & Smets, [Foundations of Science 1999, 4, 115–132; International Journal of Theoretical Physics, 2000, 38, 3231–3239]; Aerts and colleagues[Dialogue in Psychology, 1999, 10; Proceedings of Fundamental Approachs to Consciousness, Tokyo ’99; Mind in Interaction]. Basically, the intrinsic contextuality of the truth-value (...)
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  3. Bart D’Hooghe & Jaroslaw Pykacz (2004). Quantum Mechanics and Computation. Foundations of Science 9 (4):387-404.
    In quantum computation non classical features such as superposition states and entanglement are used to solve problems in new ways, impossible on classical digital computers.We illustrate by Deutsch algorithm how a quantum computer can use superposition states to outperform any classical computer. We comment on the view of a quantum computer as a massive parallel computer and recall Amdahls law for a classical parallel computer. We argue that the view on quantum computation as a massive parallel computation disregards the presence (...)
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