Search results for 'Basic Income' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Daniel Moseley (2011). A Lockean Argument for Basic Income. Basic Income Studies 6 (2):11.score: 105.0
    There are strong Lockean considerations that count in favor of a global basic income program. This paper articulates a conception of equal share left-libertarianism that is supported by the rights of full self-ownership and world-ownership. It is argued that an appropriately constructed global basic income program would be a key institution for promoting the rights of full self-ownership and world-ownership.
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  2. Matt Zwolinski (2011). Classical Liberalism and the Basic Income. Basic Income Studies 6 (2):1-14.score: 105.0
    This paper provides a brief overview of the relationship between libertarian political theory and the Universal Basic Income (UBI). It distinguishes between different forms of libertarianism and argues that a one form, classical liberalism, is compatible with and provides some grounds of support for UBI. A classical liberal UBI, however, is likely to be much smaller than the sort of UBI defended by those on the political left. And there are both contingent empirical reasons and principled moral reasons (...)
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  3. Simon Wigley (2006). Basic Income and the Problem of Cumulative Misfortune. Basic Income Studies 1 (2).score: 105.0
    This paper defends a regularly paid basic income as being better equipped to tackle unfair inequalities of outcome. It is argued that the timing of "option-luck" failures – in particular, whether they occur early in a lifetime of calculated gambles, and whether they are clustered together – may lead to a form of "brute bad luck," referred to as "cumulative misfortune." A basic income that is paid on a regular basis provides a way to prevent the (...)
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  4. Jason B. Murphy (2010). Baby Steps: Basic Income and the Need for Incremental Organizational Development. Basic Income Studies 5 (1):Article 7.score: 105.0
    Antipoverty movements have generated many “little” or “near” basic income guarantee (BIG) proposals. Most theorists discussing BIG posit a full-fledged universal grant that entirely satisfies the core value guiding their theory. Debates are conducted about feasibility, desirability and rival values. This article looks into particular considerations that need to be made when debating a little BIG. If a “status” value, meaning “all or nothing,” is the core value under debate, then a grant falling short of securing this status (...)
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  5. Doris Schroeder (2001). Wickedness, Idleness and Basic Income. Res Publica 7 (1):1-12.score: 90.0
    This paper critically analyses the position that basic income schemes foster idleness and thereby create harm. The view is based on an alleged empirical link between idleness and violent crime and an equation of non-activity with the creation of burden for others. It will be argued that the empirical claim is weak because it relies on conjectures derived from studies on unemployment. In addition, opponents arguing that basic income leads to an unfair distribution of burden between (...)
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  6. Gijs van Donselaar (1998). The Freedom-Based Account of Solidarity and Basic Income. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3):313-333.score: 90.0
    Real-libertarianism, as it is expressed in Philippe Van Parijs' recent monograph Real Freedom for All is characteristically committed to both self-ownership and 'solidarity with the infirm or handicapped. In this article it is argued that the conception of (real) freedom that is used to endorse self-ownership is inconsistent with the conception of (social) freedom or opportunity that is used to justify transfer payments to those with no or low earning capacity. The problem turns around the question whether one's (...)
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  7. Alan Cottey (forthcoming). Technologies, Culture, Work, Basic Income and Maximum Income. AI and Society:1-9.score: 90.0
    Radical changes of our cultural values in the near future are inevitable, since the current culture is ecologically unsustainable. The present proposal, radical as it may seem to some, is accordingly offered as worthy of consideration. The main section of this article is on a proposed scheme, named Asset and Income Limits, for instituting maxima to the legitimate incomes and assets of individuals. This scheme involves every individual being associated with two bank accounts, an asset account (their own property) (...)
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  8. Anca Gheaus (2008). Basic Income, Gender Justice and the Costs of Gender-Symmetrical Lifestyles. Basic Income Studies 3 (3).score: 75.0
    I argue that, in the currently gender-unjust societies a basic income would not advance feminist goals. To assess the impact of a social policy on gender justice I propose the following criterion: a society is gender-just when the costs of engaging in a lifestyle characterized by gender-symmetry (in both the domestic and public spheres) are, for both men and women, smaller or equal to the costs of engaging in a gender-asymmetrical lifestyle. For a significant number of women, a (...)
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  9. Peter Vallentyne (2011). Libertarianism and the Rejection of a Basic Income. Basic Income Studies 6:1-12.score: 60.0
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  10. Philip Pettit, A Republican Right to Basic Income?score: 60.0
    The basic income proposal provides everyone in a society, as an unconditional right, with access to a certain level of income. Introducing such a right is bound to raise questions of institutional feasibility. Would it lead too many people to opt out of the workforce, for example? And even if it did not, could a constitution that allowed some members of the society to do this – at whatever relative cost – prove acceptable in a society of (...)
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  11. Colin Farrelly (1999). Justice and a Citizens' Basic Income. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (3):283–296.score: 60.0
    Is it possible for a society with a market economy to be just? Unlike Marxists, egalitarian liberals believe that there are some conceivable circumstances where such a society could fulfil the requirements of social justice. A market society need not be exploitative. One proposal that has recently received much attention among political theorists is the suggestion that citizens should receive a basic income. Philippe Van Parijs's Real Freedom for All: What (if anything) can justify capitalism? presents one of (...)
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  12. S. Birnbaum (2011). Should Surfers Be Ostracized? Basic Income, Liberal Neutrality, and the Work Ethos. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (4):396-419.score: 60.0
    Neutralists have argued that there is something illiberal about linking access to gift-like resources to work requirements. The central liberal motivation for basic income is to provide greater freedom to choose between different ways of life, including options attaching great importance to non-market activities and disposable time. As argued by Philippe Van Parijs, even those spending their days surfing should be fed. This article examines Van Parijs' dual commitment to a ‘real libertarian’ justification of basic income (...)
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  13. Robert van der Veen (2004). Basic Income Versus Wage Subsidies: Competing Instruments in an Optimal Tax Model with a Maximin Objective. Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):147-183.score: 60.0
    This article challenges the general thesis that an unconditional basic income, set at the highest sustainable level, is required for maximizing the income-leisure opportunities of the least advantaged, when income varies according to the responsible factor of labor input. In a linear optimal taxation model (of a type suggested by Vandenbroucke 2001) in which opportunities depend only on individual productivity, adding the instrument of a uniform wage subsidy generates an array of undominated policies besides the (...) income maximizing policy, including a “zero basic income” policy which equalizes the post-tax wage rate. The choice among such undominated policies may be guided by distinct normative criteria which supplement the maximin objective in various ways. It is shown that most of these criteria will be compatible with, or actually select, the zero basic income policy and reject the basic income maximizing one. In view of the model's limited realism, the force of this main conclusion is discussed both in relation to Van Parijs' argument for basic income in Real Freedom for All (1995) and to some key empirical conditions in the real world. Footnotes1 I am grateful for useful comments on various stages of this paper by Marc Fleurbaey, Susan Hurley, Mathias Hild, Dirk Van de gaer, Frank Vandenbroucke, Alex Voorhoeve, Roland van der Veen, Andrew Williams, Chris Woodard and an anonymous referee. Above all I thank Loek Groot for his contribution. The research has also been supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), and the Social and Political Theory Program of the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University. (shrink)
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  14. V. Panitch (2011). Basic Income, Decommodification and the Welfare State. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (8):935-945.score: 60.0
    According to Philippe Van Parijs, the superiority of an unconditional basic income (UBI) over conventional means-tested liberal welfare state programs lies in its decommodifying potential. In this article I argue that even if a UBI was sustainable at high enough a level to lessen the extent to which an individual is forced to sell his or her labor power in the market, it would nonetheless have the adverse and simultaneous effect of forcing that individual into further market transactions (...)
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  15. Simon Wigley, Basic Income and the Means to Self-Govern.score: 60.0
    One line of argument in defense of an unconditional basic income is that it reduces the dependence of less advantaged citizens on others. However, its claim to help ensure individual self-government is undermined by the fact that it is consistent with social and economic inequality. For those who are more wealthy and talented are better placed to influence the democratic decision-making process according to their interests and contrary to the interests of those who are less advantaged. In sum, (...)
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  16. Gijs Van Donselaar (2009). The Right to Exploit: Parasitism, Scarcity, and Basic Income. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    In 1895 an English farmer diverted the course of a stream that was flowing through his land, thereby cutting off the supply to the water reservoir of the neighboring community. The courts established that it had been his purpose to "injure the plaintiffs by carrying off the water and to compel them to buy him off." Regardless of what the law says, most people will feel that the farmer's intentions were morally unjust; he was trying to abuse his property rights (...)
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  17. Simon Birnbaum (2013). Self-Ownership, Liberal Neutrality and the Realm of Freedom: New Reflections on the Justification of Basic Income. Jurisprudence 4 (2):344-357.score: 60.0
    Self-Ownership, Liberal Neutrality and the Realm of Freedom: New Reflections on the Justification of Basic Income. A review of Axel Gosseries and Yannick Vanderborght (eds), Arguing about Justice: Essays for Philippe Van Parijs.
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  18. Alessandro Pinzani (2010). Minimal Income as Basic Condition for Autonomy. Veritas 55 (1).score: 57.0
    In this paper I shall deal with the question of whether a State-granted minimal income (which is not the same as a basic income) is a necessary condition in order for individuals (1) to attain a basic level of autonomy; and (2) to develop capabilities that allow them to improve the quality of their life. As a theoretical basis for my analysis I shall use Honneth’s theory of recognition, Sen’s capability approach (also in the version offered (...)
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  19. Philippe Van Parijs (1991). Why Surfers Should Be Fed: The Liberal Case for an Unconditional Basic Income. Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (2):101-131.score: 45.0
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  20. Brian Barry (1996). Real Freedom and Basic Income. Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (3):242–276.score: 45.0
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  21. Richard J. Arneson (1992). Is Socialism Dead? A Comment on Market Socialism and Basic Income Capitalism. Ethics 102 (3):485-511.score: 45.0
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  22. Philippe Van Parijs (1992). Basic Income Capitalism. Ethics 102 (3):465-484.score: 45.0
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  23. Philippe Van Parijs (1991). Why Surfers Should Be Fed: The Liberal Case for an Unconditional Basic Income. Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (2):101 - 131.score: 45.0
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  24. Jonathan Wolff (2010). Review of Gijs Van Donselaar, The Right to Exploit: Parasitism, Scarcity, Basic Income. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).score: 45.0
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  25. Andrew Williams (1999). Resource Egalitarianism and the Limits to Basic Income. Economics and Philosophy 15 (01):85-.score: 45.0
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  26. Catriona Mckinnon (2003). Basic Income, Self-Respect and Reciprocity. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):143–158.score: 45.0
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  27. Eugene V. Torisky Jr (1993). Van Parijs, Rawls, and Unconditional Basic Income. Analysis 53 (4):289 - 297.score: 45.0
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  28. Robert J. Van Der Veen (1997). Debate: Real Freedom and Basic Income: Comment on Brian Barry. Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (3):274–286.score: 45.0
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  29. Philippe Van Parijs (1992). Basic Income Capitalism. Ethics 102 (3):465 - 484.score: 45.0
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  30. John Cunliffe & Guido Erreygers (2003). 'Basic Income? Basic Capital!' Origins and Issues of a Debate. Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (1):89–110.score: 45.0
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  31. Robert Mayer (2011). The Right to Exploit: Parasitism, Scarcity, Basic Income, Gijs van Donselaar. Oxford University Press, 2009. Ix + 195 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (1):69-75.score: 45.0
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  32. Philippe Parijvans (1992). Basic Income Capitalism. Ethics 102 (3):465-.score: 45.0
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  33. L. F. M. Groot (2002). Compensatory Justice and Basic Income. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (1):141–161.score: 45.0
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  34. E. V. Torisky (1993). Van Parijs, Rawls, and Unconditional Basic Income. Analysis 53 (4):289-297.score: 45.0
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  35. Simon Birnbaum (2010). Radical Liberalism, Rawls and the Welfare State: Justifying the Politics of Basic Income. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (4):495-516.score: 45.0
  36. Lucas Swaine (2011). Work Lovers, Freedom, and Basic Income. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (1):21-36.score: 45.0
  37. Jurgen De Wispelaere (2000). Sharing Job Resources: Ethical Reflections on the Justification of Basic Income. Analyse and Kritik 22 (2):237-256.score: 45.0
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  38. Lasse Ekstrand (2008). Basic Income Beyond Wage Slavery: In Search of Transcending Political Aesthetics Lasse Ekstrand and Monika Wallmon. In Gavin Grindon (ed.), Aesthetics and Radical Politics. Cambridge Scholars. 42.score: 45.0
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  39. Graham Macdonald (2006). Ackerman, Bruce, Anne Alstott, Philippe Van Parijs, and Others. 2006. Redesigning Distribution: Basic Income and Stakeholder Grants as Alternative Cornerstones for a More Egalitarian Capitalism. The Real Utopias Project, Vol. 5. Edited by Erik Olin Wright. London: Verso. Xii+ 228 Pp. Alcoff, Linda Martin. 2006. Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self. Studies. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 115 (3).score: 45.0
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  40. Julia Maskivker (2011). Work Lovers, Freedom, and Basic Income. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (1):21.score: 45.0
  41. Sœren Flinch Midtgaard (2000). Ambition-Sensitivity and an Unconditional Basic Income. Analyse Und Kritik 22 (2):223-36.score: 45.0
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  42. Claus Offe (2009). Basic Income and the Labor Contract. Analyse and Kritik 31 (1).score: 45.0
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  43. Guy Standing (forthcoming). The Folly of Social Safety Nets: Why Basic Income is Needed in Eastern Europe. Social Research.score: 45.0
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  44. Richard Sturn & Rudi Dujmovits (2000). Basic Income in Complex Worlds. Individual Freedom and Social Interdependencies. Analyse Und Kritik 22 (2):198-222.score: 45.0
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  45. Antoon Vandevelde (1997). Basic Income, Work, and Real Freedom. A Comment on Philippe Van Parijs. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 59 (4):666-697.score: 45.0
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  46. P. Van Parijs (1997). Work, Freedom, Basic Income-Reply to Toon Vandevelde. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 59 (4):698-701.score: 45.0
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  47. Stuart White (2002). Liberal Equality, Exploitation, and the Case for an Unconditional Basic Income. Political Studies 45 (2):312-326.score: 45.0
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  48. Karl Widerquist, JosÉ Noguera, A., Yannick Vanderborght & Jurgen De Wispelaere (eds.) (2013). Basic Income: An Anthology of Contemporary Research. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 45.0
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  49. Karl Widerquist (2010). The Physical Basis of Voluntary Trade. Human Rights Review 11 (1):83-103.score: 45.0
    The article discusses the conditions under which can we say that people enter the economic system voluntarily. “The Need for an Exit Option” briefly explains the philosophical argument that voluntary interaction requires an exit option—a reasonable alternative to participation in the projects of others. “The Treatment of Effective Forced Labor in Economic and Political Theory” considers the treatment of effectively forced interaction in economic and political theory. “Human Need” discusses theories of human need to determine the capabilities a person requires (...)
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  50. Matt Zwolinski (2010). Gijs Van Donselaar, The Right to Exploit: Parasitism, Scarcity, Basic Income. Ethics 121 (1):228.score: 45.0
     
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