Search results for 'Beer Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Rainer Beer (1989). A Key to Philosophy. Philosophy and History 22 (2):168-169.
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  2.  18
    Rainer Beer (1989). The Productivity of Nature. Schelling's Natural Philosophy and the New Paradigm of Self-Organization in the Sciences. Philosophy and History 22 (1):16-18.
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  3.  25
    Steven D. Hales (ed.) (2007). Beer & Philosophy: The Unexamined Beer Isn't Worth Drinking. Blackwell Pub..
    A beer-lovers' book which playfully examines a myriad of philosophical concerns related to beer consumption. Effectively demonstrates how real philosophical issues exist just below the surface of our everyday activities Divided into four sections: The Art of the Beer; The Ethics of Beer: Pleasures, Freedom, and Character; The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Beer; and Beer in the History of Philosophy Uses the context of beer to expose George Berkeley’s views on fermented beverages (...)
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  4. Steven D. Hales (ed.) (2010). Beer and Philosophy: The Unexamined Beer Isn't Worth Drinking. Wiley-Blackwell.
    An anthology of popular philosophy addressing the metaphysics, aesthetics, and ethics of beer, beer drinking, production, and culture.
     
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  5. Steven D. Hales (ed.) (2007). Beer and Philosophy. Blackwell.
    A beer-lovers' book which playfully examines a myriad of philosophical concerns related to beer consumption. Effectively demonstrates how real philosophical issues exist just below the surface of our everyday activities Divided into four sections: The Art of the Beer; The Ethics of Beer: Pleasures, Freedom, and Character; The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Beer; and Beer in the History of Philosophy Uses the context of beer to expose George Berkeley’s views on fermented beverages (...)
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  6.  1
    Warner A. Wick (1949). The Pursuit of Wisdom: Reflections on Some Recent Pursuers:Man and Metaphysics. George Plimpton Adams; The City of Reason. Samuel Beer; Existence and Inquiry. Otis Lee; The Protestant Era. Paul Tillich, James Luther; La Science, La Raison, Et La Foi. S. Van Mierlo; The Philosopher's Way. Jean Wahl; Introduction to Realistic Philosophy. John Wild. [REVIEW] Ethics 59 (4):257-.
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  7. Michael C. Jackson (2007). Beer and Philosophy: The Unexamined Beer Isn't Worth Drinking. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  8.  13
    Dave Monroe & Fritz Allhoff (eds.) (2007). Food & Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry. Blackwell.
    Food & Philosophy offers a collection of essays which explore a range of philosophical topics related to food; it joins Wine & Philosophy and Beer & Philosophy in in the "Epicurean Trilogy." Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, food writers, and professional chefs.
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  9.  2
    Martin Cohen (2008). Philosophical Tales: Being an Alternative History Revealing the Characters, the Plots, and the Hidden Scenes That Make Up the True Story of Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
    Did Plato really write those Socratic Dialogues – or was it Socrates after all? Why is it doubtful that Descartes ever really uttered, “I think, therefore I am”? And what did Sartre ever have against waiters, anyway? The history of philosophy is filled with great tales – many of them fictions, misrepresentations, falsehoods, lies and fibs. Or are they just misstatements, prevarications, and narratives not entirely based on fact? In the true spirit of a broad philosophical debate, Philosophical Tales (...)
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  10.  3
    Fritz Allhoff & Dave Monroe (eds.) (2009). Food and Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Food & Philosophy_ offers a collection of essays which explore a range of philosophical topics related to food; it joins _Wine & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy." Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, food writers, and professional chefs. Provides a critical reflection on what and how we eat can contribute to a robust enjoyment of gastronomic pleasures A thoughtful, yet playful collection which emphasizes the importance of food as a proper object of philosophical (...)
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  11. Fritz Allhoff & Dave Monroe (eds.) (2009). Food and Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Food & Philosophy_ offers a collection of essays which explore a range of philosophical topics related to food; it joins _Wine & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy." Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, food writers, and professional chefs. Provides a critical reflection on what and how we eat can contribute to a robust enjoyment of gastronomic pleasures A thoughtful, yet playful collection which emphasizes the importance of food as a proper object of philosophical (...)
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  12. Fritz Allhoff (ed.) (2009). Wine and Philosophy: A Symposium on Thinking and Drinking. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In _Wine & Philosophy,_ philosophers, wine critics, and winemakers share their passion for wine through well-crafted essays that explore wine’s deeper meaning, nature, and significance Joins _Food & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, wine writers, and winemakers Chapters include, “The Art & Culture of Wine”; “Tasting & Talking about Wine”; “Wine & Its Critics”; “The Beauty of Wine”; “The Metaphysics of Wine”; and “The Politics & Economics (...)
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  13. Fritz Allhoff (ed.) (2010). Wine and Philosophy: A Symposium on Thinking and Drinking. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In _Wine & Philosophy,_ philosophers, wine critics, and winemakers share their passion for wine through well-crafted essays that explore wine’s deeper meaning, nature, and significance Joins _Food & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, wine writers, and winemakers Chapters include, “The Art & Culture of Wine”; “Tasting & Talking about Wine”; “Wine & Its Critics”; “The Beauty of Wine”; “The Metaphysics of Wine”; and “The Politics & Economics (...)
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  14. Fritz Allhoff (ed.) (2007). Wine and Philosophy: A Symposium on Thinking and Drinking. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In _Wine & Philosophy,_ philosophers, wine critics, and winemakers share their passion for wine through well-crafted essays that explore wine’s deeper meaning, nature, and significance Joins _Food & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, wine writers, and winemakers Chapters include, “The Art & Culture of Wine”; “Tasting & Talking about Wine”; “Wine & Its Critics”; “The Beauty of Wine”; “The Metaphysics of Wine”; and “The Politics & Economics (...)
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  15. Fritz Allhoff & Dave Monroe (eds.) (2007). Food and Philosophy. John Wiley & Sons.
    _Food & Philosophy_ offers a collection of essays which explore a range of philosophical topics related to food; it joins _Wine & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy." Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, food writers, and professional chefs. Provides a critical reflection on what and how we eat can contribute to a robust enjoyment of gastronomic pleasures A thoughtful, yet playful collection which emphasizes the importance of food as a proper object of philosophical (...)
     
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  16. Matt Lawrence (2011). Philosophy on Tap: Pint-Sized Puzzles for the Pub Philosopher. Wiley-Blackwell.
    When beer starts to flow, philosophical discussions naturally follow. _Philosophy on Tap_ takes pub philosophy to the next level, pairing 48 of life's greatest philosophical questions with 48 of the world's best beers. Features a unique presentation of philosophical puzzles, paradoxes, and debates by considering 48 of life's biggest questions in the context of 48 distinctive beers from around the world Provides a highly engaging and sociable approach to the classic philosophical problems as well as a unique look (...)
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  17. Matt Lawrence (2011). Philosophy on Tap: Pint-Sized Puzzles for the Pub Philosopher. Wiley-Blackwell.
    When beer starts to flow, philosophical discussions naturally follow. _Philosophy on Tap_ takes pub philosophy to the next level, pairing 48 of life's greatest philosophical questions with 48 of the world's best beers. Features a unique presentation of philosophical puzzles, paradoxes, and debates by considering 48 of life's biggest questions in the context of 48 distinctive beers from around the world Provides a highly engaging and sociable approach to the classic philosophical problems as well as a unique look (...)
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  18. Matt Lawrence (2011). Philosophy on Tap: Pint-Sized Puzzles for the Pub Philosopher. Wiley-Blackwell.
    When beer starts to flow, philosophical discussions naturally follow. _Philosophy on Tap_ takes pub philosophy to the next level, pairing 48 of life's greatest philosophical questions with 48 of the world's best beers. Features a unique presentation of philosophical puzzles, paradoxes, and debates by considering 48 of life's biggest questions in the context of 48 distinctive beers from around the world Provides a highly engaging and sociable approach to the classic philosophical problems as well as a unique look (...)
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  19. Theodore Schick (2007). Beer and Gnosis: The Mead of Inspiration. In Steven D. Hales (ed.), Beer and Philosophy. Blackwell 137--147.
     
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  20. C. S. De Beer (1981). Hermeneutical Philosophy in Dialogue with Psychoanalysis and Structuralism: The Renewal of the Subject. University of Zululand.
     
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  21.  8
    Matt Lawrence (2011). Philosophy on Tap: Pint-Sized Puzzles for the Pub Philosopher. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Transporter Troubles. -- 2. Zeno's Hand to Mouth Paradox. -- 3. If a Pint Spills in the Forest. -- 4. The Beer Goggles Paradox. -- 5. Pascal's Wager. -- 6. The Experience Machine. -- 7. Lucretius' Spear. -- 8. The Omnipotence Dilemma. -- 9. What Mary Didn't Know About Lager. -- 10. Malcolm X and the Whites Only Bar. -- 11. Untangling Taste. -- 12. The Foreknowledge Paradox. -- 13. The Buddha's Missing Self. -- (...)
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  22.  22
    Beth Preston (2003). Of Marigold Beer: A Reply to Vermaas and Houkes. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (4):601-612.
    Vermaas and Houkes advance four desiderata for theories of artifact function, and classify such theories into non-intentionalist reproduction theories on the one hand and intentionalist non-reproduction theories on the other. They argue that non-intentionalist reproduction theories fail to satisfy their fourth desideratum. They maintain that only an intentionalist non-reproduction theory can satisfy all the desiderata, and they offer a version that they believe does satisfy all of them. I reply that intentionalist non-reproduction theories, including their version, fail to satisfy their (...)
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  23.  74
    Steven D. Hales (2007). Mill V. Miller, or Higher and Lower Pleasures. In Steven Hales (ed.), Beer & Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    I offer an interpretation of John Stuart Mill's theory of higher and lower pleasures in his Utilitarianism. I argue that the quality of pleasure is best understood as the density of pleasure per unit of delivery. Mill is illustrated with numerous beer examples.
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  24.  14
    Todd Jones (2006). "We Always Have a Beer After the Meeting": How Norms, Customs, Conventions, and the Like Explain Behavior. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (3):251-275.
    There are a vast number of ways of explaining human behavior in the social sciences and in ordinary conversation. One family of accounts seeks to explain behavior using terms such as norms, customs, tradition, convention , and culture . Despite the ubiquity of these terms, it is not fully clear how these concepts really explain behavior, how they are related, how they differ, and what they contrast with. In this article, I hope to answer such questions. Key Words: norm • (...)
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  25.  1
    Robert Bud (2014). The Beer Experience: Nineteenth Century Relations Between Science and Praxis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 47:224-226.
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  26.  10
    J. H. Woodger (1930). Embryology and Evolution. By G. R. De Beer. (Oxford: At the Clarendon Press. 1930. Pp. Ix + 116. Price 5s. Net.). Philosophy 5 (19):482-.
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  27. Stephen Satris (1996). FH Low-Beer, Questions of Judgment: Determining What's Right Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (2):114-115.
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  28. Stephen Satris (1996). F.H. Low-Beer, Questions Of Judgment: Determining What's Right. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 16:114-115.
     
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  29. Jonah N. Schupbach (forthcoming). Experimental Philosophy Meets Formal Epistemology. In Sytsma & Buckwalter (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell
    Formal epistemology is just what it sounds like: epistemology done with formal tools. Coinciding with the general rise in popularity of experimental philosophy, formal epistemologists have begun to apply experimental methods in their own work. In this entry, I survey some of the work at the intersection of formal and experimental epistemology. I show that experimental methods have unique roles to play when epistemology is done formally, and I highlight some ways in which results from formal epistemology have been (...)
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  30. Florian Cova, Amanda Garcia & Shen-yi Liao (2015). Experimental Philosophy of Aesthetics. Philosophy Compass 10 (12):927-939.
    In the past decade, experimental philosophy---the attempt at making progress on philosophical problems using empirical methods---has thrived in a wide range of domains. However, only in recent years has aesthetics succeeded in drawing the attention of experimental philosophers. The present paper constitutes the first survey of these works and of the nascent field of 'experimental philosophy of aesthetics'. We present both recent experimental works by philosophers on topics such as the ontology of aesthetics, aesthetic epistemology, aesthetic concepts, and (...)
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  31.  99
    Mark Alfano & Don Loeb (2014). Experimental Moral Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:1-32.
    Experimental moral philosophy began to emerge as a methodology in the last decade of the twentieth century, a branch of the larger experimental philosophy (X-Phi, XΦ) approach. From the beginning, it has been embroiled in controversy on a number of fronts. Some doubt that it is philosophy at all. Others acknowledge that it is philosophy but think that it has produced modest results at best and confusion at worst. Still others think it represents an important advance.
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  32.  26
    David R. Hilbert (2007). Drink on, the Jolly Prelate Cries. In Steven Hales (ed.), Philosophy and Beer. Routledge
    The 18th century philosopher and Anglican bishop, George Berkeley, is chiefly known to posterity for advocating the radical thesis that there is no unthinking stuff in the world. According to Berkeley, bar stools, kegs, mugs and the all paraphernalia of ordinary life (plus everything else) are merely ideas and have no existence outside the mind of those seated on the stools, tapping the kegs, and drinking from the mugs. What is less well-known is that Berkeley devoted much of his energy (...)
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  33. E. S. de Beer (ed.) (2010). The Correspondence of John Locke, Volume 1: Introduction, Letters 1-461. OUP Oxford.
    E. S. de Beer>'s eight-volume edition of the correspondence of John Locke is a classic of modern scholarship. The intellectual range of the correspondence is universal, covering philosophy, theology, medicine, history, geography, economics, law, politics, travel and botany. This first volume covers the years 1650 to 1679.
     
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  34. E. S. de Beer (ed.) (2009). The Correspondence of John Locke: Volume 1 Introduction, Letters 1-461. Oxford University Press Uk.
    E. S. de Beer's eight-volume edition of the correspondence of John Locke is a classic of modern scholarship. The intellectual range of the correspondence is universal, covering philosophy, theology, medicine, history, geography, economics, law, politics, travel and botany. This first volume covers the years 1650 to 1679. 'When the eight volumes of correspondence have appeared they will be recognized as one of the great scholarly achievements of their day.' K. H. D. Haley, Times Literary Supplement.
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  35. Jennifer Nagel & Kaija Mortensen (forthcoming). Armchair-Friendly Experimental Philosophy. In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell
    Once symbolized by a burning armchair, experimental philosophy has in recent years shifted away from its original hostility to traditional methods. Starting with a brief historical review of the experimentalist challenge to traditional philosophical practice, this chapter looks at research undercutting that challenge, and at ways in which experimental work has evolved to complement and strengthen traditional approaches to philosophical questions.
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  36. Eric Dietrich (2011). There Is No Progress in Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form of anosognosia, (...)
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  37.  92
    Marcus P. Adams (2016). Hobbes on Natural Philosophy as "True Physics" and Mixed Mathematics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:43-51.
    I offer an alternative account of the relationship of Hobbesian geometry to natural philosophy by arguing that mixed mathematics provided Hobbes with a model for thinking about it. In mixed mathematics, one may borrow causal principles from one science and use them in another science without there being a deductive relationship between those two sciences. Natural philosophy for Hobbes is mixed because an explanation may combine observations from experience (the ‘that’) with causal principles from geometry (the ‘why’). My (...)
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  38. Joshua Knobe (2007). Experimental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 2 (1):81–92.
    Claims about people's intuitions have long played an important role in philosophical debates. The new field of experimental philosophy seeks to subject such claims to rigorous tests using the traditional methods of cognitive science – systematic experimentation and statistical analysis. Work in experimental philosophy thus far has investigated people's intuitions in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, epistemology, and ethics. Although it is now generally agreed that experimental philosophers have made surprising discoveries about people's intuitions in (...)
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  39.  27
    Jonathan M. Weinberg (2016). Experimental Philosophy, Noisy Intuitions, and Messy Inferences. In Jennifer Nado (ed.), Advances in Experimental Philosophy & Philosophical Methodology. Bloomsbury
    Much discussion about experimental philosophy and philosophical methodology has been framed in terms of the reliability of intuitions, and even when it has not been about reliability per se, it has been focused on whether intuitions meet whatever conditions they need to meet to be trustworthy as evidence. But really that question cannot be answered independently from the questions, evidence for what theories arrived at by what sorts of inferences? I will contend here that not just philosophy's sources (...)
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  40.  18
    Johan van Benthem (2015). Logic and Philosophy, a Sea of Stories. Tsinghua Studies in Western Philosophy 1 (1):124-153.
    The interface of logic and philosophy is diverse, and has always been so. Understanding the interplay raises issues on which some philosophers have strong a priori views. My own preference as a working logician is to proceed by actual history of ideas, something still largely to be written for modern logic. I shall present a few lines connecting logic and philosophy around the theme of implication and consequence, and show how rich the agenda is as it keeps evolving (...)
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  41.  54
    Tom Doherty, Samuel Baron & Kristie Miller (2015). Why is There Female Under-Representation Among Philosophy Majors? Evidence of a Pre-University Effect. Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
    Why does female under- representation emerge during undergraduate education? At the University of Sydney, we surveyed students before and after their first philosophy course. We failed to find any evidence that this course disproportionately discouraged female students from continuing in philosophy relative to male students. Instead, we found evidence of an interaction effect between gender and existing attitudes about philosophy coming into tertiary education that appears at least partially responsible for this poor retention. At the first lecture, (...)
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  42. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2015). The Benefit to Philosophy of the Study of its History. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):161-184.
    This paper advances the view that the history of philosophy is both a kind of history and a kind of philosophy. Through a discussion of some examples from epistemology, metaphysics, and the historiography of philosophy, it explores the benefit to philosophy of a deep and broad engagement with its history. It comes to the conclusion that doing history of philosophy is a way to think outside the box of the current philosophical orthodoxies. Somewhat paradoxically, far (...)
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  43. Rene Descartes (2004). Meditations on First Philosophy. Caravan Books.
    I have always considered that the two questions respecting God and the Soul were the chief of those that ought to be demonstrated by philosophical rather than ...
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  44. Babette E. Babich (2003). On the Analytic-Continental Divide in Philosophy : Nietzsche's Lying Truth, Heidegger's Speaking Language, and Philosophy. In C. G. Prado (ed.), A House Divided: Comparing Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Humanity Books
    On the political nature of the analytic - continental distinction in professional philosophy and the general tendency to discredit continental philosophy while redesignating the rubric as analytically conceived.
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  45.  22
    Matthew C. Halteman & Megan Halteman Zwart (2016). "Philosophy as Therapy for Recovering (Unrestrained) Omnivores". In Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo, and Matthew C. Halteman, eds., Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments about the Ethics of Eating, New York: Routledge, 2016.
    Recourse to a variety of well-constructed arguments is undoubtedly a significant strategic asset for cultivating more ethical eating habits and convincing others to follow suit. Nevertheless, common obstacles often prevent even the best arguments from getting traction in our lives. For one thing, many of us enter the discussion hampered by firmly-entrenched but largely uninvestigated assumptions about food that make it difficult to imagine how even well-supported arguments that challenge our familiar frames of culinary reference could actually apply to us. (...)
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  46.  10
    Michael Beaney (2016). Historiography, Philosophy of History and the Historical Turn in Analytic Philosophy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):211-234.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 211 - 234 This article has three main interconnected aims. First, I illustrate the historiographical conceptions of three early analytic philosophers: Frege, Russell and Wittgenstein. Second, I consider some of the historiographical debates that have been generated by the recent historical turn in analytic philosophy, looking at the work of Scott Soames and Hans-Johann Glock, in particular. Third, I discuss Arthur Danto’s _Analytic Philosophy of History_, published 50 years ago, and argue (...)
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  47. Max Deutsch (2010). Intuitions, Counter-Examples, and Experimental Philosophy. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3):447-460.
    Practitioners of the new ‘experimental philosophy’ have collected data that appear to show that some philosophical intuitions are culturally variable. Many experimental philosophers take this to pose a problem for a more traditional, ‘armchair’ style of philosophizing. It is argued that this is a mistake that derives from a false assumption about the character of philosophical methods; neither philosophy nor its methods have anything to fear from cultural variability in philosophical intuitions.
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  48.  78
    Vincent C. Müller (2008). What a Course on Philosophy of Computing is Not. APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Computers 8 (1):36-38.
    Immanuel Kant famously defined philosophy to be about three questions: “What can I know? What should I do? What can I hope for?” (KrV, B833). I want to suggest that the three questions of our course on the philosophy of computing are: What is computing? What should we do with computing? What could computing do?
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  49.  39
    Bence Nanay (forthcoming). Philosophy of Perception: A Road-Map with Many Bypass Roads. In Current Controversies in Philosophy of Perception. Routlegde
    An introduction to contemporary debates in philosophy of perception.
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  50.  49
    Elliott Sober (1994). From a Biological Point of View: Essays in Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Elliott Sober is one of the leading philosophers of science and is a former winner of the Lakatos Prize, the major award in the field. This new collection of essays will appeal to a readership that extends well beyond the frontiers of the philosophy of science. Sober shows how ideas in evolutionary biology bear in significant ways on traditional problems in philosophy of mind and language, epistemology, and metaphysics. Amongst the topics addressed are psychological egoism, solipsism, and the (...)
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