Search results for 'Beginning' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Albertas Milinis, Agnė Baranskaitė & Armanas Abramavičius (2011). Problematic Aspects of the Beginning and end of Human Life in the Context of Homicide (article in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 18 (3):1123-1143.score: 24.0
    Both in criminal law science and in the judicial practice there are a lot of discussions as to what should be considered as the beginning and end of human life. Birth and death are not instantaneous acts, but rather processes made up of time-spans that can be construed as evidence of the beginning or end of a human life. From a biological point of view the human life is a constant, continuous metabolic process after cessation of which the (...)
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  2. John Sallis (1999). Chorology: On Beginning in Plato's Timaeus. Indiana University Press.score: 21.0
    "This excellent work... deserves the serious consideration of all who are interested in contemporary philosophy as well as those who concern themselves with ...
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  3. Arnold Ehrhardt (1968). The Beginning. New York, Barnes & Noble.score: 21.0
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  4. John P. Lizza (ed.) (2009). Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 21.0
  5. Chris Mortensen (2003). In the Beginning. Erkenntnis 59 (2):141 - 156.score: 18.0
    In this paper, a survey is made of some of the contributionsto the interpretation of Hartle and Hawking's theory of thewave function of the universe and its beginning. It is arguedthat there are considerable difficulties with the interpretationof the theory, but that there is at least one interpretationhitherto not found in the literature which survives existingphilosophical objections.
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  6. Quentin Smith (1988). The Uncaused Beginning of the Universe. Philosophy of Science 55 (1):39-57.score: 18.0
    There is sufficient evidence at present to justify the belief that the universe began to exist without being caused to do so. This evidence includes the Hawking-Penrose singularity theorems that are based on Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, and the recently introduced Quantum Cosmological Models of the early universe. The singularity theorems lead to an explication of the beginning of the universe that involves the notion of a Big Bang singularity, and the Quantum Cosmological Models represent the beginning (...)
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  7. Richard Swinburne (1996). The Beginning of the Universe and of Time. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):169 - 189.score: 18.0
    Given four modest verificationist theses, tying the meaning of talk about instants and periods to the events which (physically) could occur during, before or after them, the only content to the claim the Universe had a beginning (applicable equally to chaotic or orderly universes) is in terms of it being preceded by empty time. It follows that time cannot have a beginning. The Universe, however, could have a beginning--even if it has lasted for an infinite time.
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  8. Henrik Zinkernagel (2008). Did Time Have a Beginning? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (3):237 – 258.score: 18.0
    By analyzing the meaning of time I argue, without endorsing operationalism, that time is necessarily related to physical systems which can serve as clocks. This leads to a version of relationism about time which entails that there is no time 'before' the universe. Three notions of metaphysical 'time' (associated, respectively, with time as a mathematical concept, substantivalism, and modal relationism) which might support the idea of time 'before' the universe are discussed. I argue that there are no good reasons to (...)
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  9. David S. Oderberg (2003). The Beginning of Existence. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (2):145-157.score: 18.0
    Central to recent debate over the Kalam Cosmological Argument, and over the origin of the universe in general, has been the issue of whether the universe began to exist and, if so, how this is to be understood. Adolf Grünbaum has used two cosmological models as a basis for arguing that the universe did not begin to exist according to either of them. Concentrating in this paper on the second (“open interval”) model, I argue that he is wrong on both (...)
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  10. C. Mortensen & J. Csavas, In the Beginning.score: 18.0
    In this paper, a survey is made of some of the contributions to the interpretation of Hartle and Hawking’s theory of the wave function of the universe and its beginning. It is argued that there are considerable difficulties with the interpretation of the theory, but that there is at least one interpretation hitherto not found in the literature which survives existing philosophical objections.
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  11. Daniel Watts (2007). The Paradox of Beginning: Hegel, Kierkegaard and Philosophical Inquiry. Inquiry 50 (1):5 – 33.score: 18.0
    This paper reconsiders certain of Kierkegaard's criticisms of Hegel's theoretical philosophy in the light of recent interpretations of the latter. The paper seeks to show how these criticisms, far from being merely parochial or rhetorical, turn on central issues concerning the nature of thought and what it is to think. I begin by introducing Hegel's conception of "pure thought" as this is distinguished by his commitment to certain general requirements on a properly philosophical form of inquiry. I then outline (...)
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  12. Victor Stenger, Mann Talk: No Beginning...No End...No Past...No Future.score: 18.0
    is conscious of a beginning and end calls change time. But in reality there is no time, there is only change. The universe had no beginning and has no ending, it just is. Time to man is an illusion. Just as man once thought that the world was flat, that Earth was the center of the universe, that the sun rose and set and that he had free will, so he thinks that there is a beginning..
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  13. David S. Waller (2012). “Truth in Advertising”: The Beginning of Advertising Ethics in Australia. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (1):46-56.score: 18.0
    In Australia, as in many countries, the early advertising industry had a poor reputation for honesty. However, in 1920 ?truth in advertising? and raising ethical behavior became the focus of the Second Convention of Advertising Men of Australasia, held in Sydney. This was a major event in Australia's advertising history and was seen as a way to legitimize the industry in the eyes of those who doubted advertising's honesty. This paper will look at the Sydney Advertising Convention, with particular reference (...)
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  14. Yaakov Zik (2001). Science and Instruments: The Telescope as a Scientific Instrument at the Beginning of the Seventeenth Century. Perspectives on Science 9 (3):259-284.score: 18.0
    : Scientific observation is determined by the human sensory system, which generally relies on instruments that serve as mediators between the world and the senses. Instruments came in the shape of Heron's Dioptra, Levi Ben Gerson's Cross-staff, Egnatio Danti's Torqvetto Astronomico, Tycho's Quadrant, Galileo's Geometric Military Compass, or Kepler's Ecliptic Instrument. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, however, it was unclear how an instrument such as the telescope could be employed to acquire new information and expand knowledge about (...)
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  15. Robert Metcalf (2013). The Elemental Sallis: On Wonder and Philosophy's "Beginning". Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (2):208-215.score: 18.0
    One will never be able to interrogate wonder philosophically except by way of a questioning that the operation of wonder will already have determined. It is a well-known teaching in the writings of both Plato and Aristotle that wonder (thauma) is the beginning of philosophy. But few philosophers have given wonder much thought—certainly, no philosopher that I am aware of has, like Professor Sallis, returned time and again to think through wonder. Sallis’s thinking through wonder is guided by his (...)
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  16. Quentin Smith (1985). On the Beginning of Time. Noûs 19 (4):579-584.score: 18.0
    You can search this site: Note that this analysis of a beginning of time concerns intervals ’of the same length' ; if this qualifying phrase is not added, then the analysis would be invalid for a dense time. If time is dense and began, then for each interval of time there is another interval of a shorter length that is a part of that interval and which completely elapses before the interval of which it is (...)
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  17. Anthony F. Beavers, In the Beginning Was the Word and Then Four Revolutions in the History of Information.score: 18.0
    In the beginning was the word, or grunt, or groan, or signal of some sort. This, however, hardly qualifies as an information revolution, at least in any standard technological sense. Nature is replete with meaningful signs, and we must imagine that our early ancestors noticed natural patterns that helped to determine when to sow and when to reap, which animal tracks to follow, what to eat, and so forth. Spoken words at first must have been meaningful in some similar (...)
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  18. Robert A. Krieg (1995). A Fortieth-Anniversary Reappraisal of `Chalcedon: End or Beginning?'. Philosophy and Theology 9 (1/2):77-116.score: 18.0
    This essay shows why Karl Rahner’s “Chalcedon: End or Beginning?,” also titled “Current Problems in Christology” (1954), stands as a breakthrough in contemporary Catholic Christology. After describing the Neo-Thomism and Neo-Scholasticism of the early twentieth century, it examines one instance of this body of thought: Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange’s “Christ the Savior” (1946). Then, the essay reviews the argument of “Chalcedon: End or Beginning?” Finally, it contrasts Garrigou-Lagrange’s literal Thomism and Rahner’s transcendental Thomism.
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  19. Pamela S. Maykut (1994). Beginning Qualitative Research: A Philosophic and Practical Guide. Falmer Press.score: 18.0
    Although theoretically rigorous, the book is comprehensible to the beginning qualitative researcher.
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  20. Wes Morriston (2000). Must the Beginning of the Universe Have a Personal Cause? Faith and Philosophy 17 (2):149-169.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to take a close look at some little discussed aspects of the kalam cosmological argument, with a view to deciding whether there is any reason to believe the causal principle on which it rests (“Whatever begins to exist must have a cause”), and also with a view to determining what conclusions can be drawn about the nature of the First Cause of the universe (supposing thatthere is one). I am particularly concerned with the problems (...)
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  21. Fiona Cram, Hazel Phillips, Bevan Tipene-Matua, Murray Parsons & Katrina Taupo (2004). A 'Parallel Process'? Beginning a Constructive Conversation About a Mäori Methodology. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):14-19.score: 18.0
    This paper documents the beginning of a conversation about what it means to be Mäori within a larger, mainstream research project. This larger project was conceived by a team of researchers that included a Mäori principal investigator, and funding was gained from a funding agency that has established criteria for Mäori responsiveness. The Mäori component of the project was, however, not initially conceived of as separate from the non-Mäori component. Discussions about this were initiated approximately one year into the (...)
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  22. C. Andone (2010). Henrique Jales Ribeiro (Ed.): Rhetoric and Argumentation in the Beginning of the XXIst Century . Coimbra University Press, Coimbra, 2009, 312 Pp. [REVIEW] Argumentation 24 (4):513-518.score: 18.0
    Henrique Jales Ribeiro (Ed.): Rhetoric and Argumentation in the Beginning of the XXIst Century . Coimbra University Press, Coimbra, 2009, 312 pp Content Type Journal Article Pages 513-518 DOI 10.1007/s10503-010-9194-3 Authors C. Andone, Department of Speech Communication, Argumentation Theory and Rhetoric, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Spuistraat 134, 1012 VB Amsterdam, The Netherlands Journal Argumentation Online ISSN 1572-8374 Print ISSN 0920-427X Journal Volume Volume 24 Journal Issue Volume 24, Number 4.
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  23. Oana Cogeanu (2012). In the Beginning Was the Triangle. Cultura 9 (2):33-44.score: 18.0
    In the beginning was the triangle, the apostles of semiology say. In arguing for a semiological approach to literature, this paper highlights first that theconsecrated semiotic triangle seen in perspective proves to be a pyramid, with its faces consisting of minimal semiotic triads; it then suggests that the pyramidalsemiotic constructs within a given context project the figure of infinite semiosis; finally, it proposes an illustration of the literary process of signification using thealchemical image of the clepsydra.
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  24. Hans-Ulrich Wohler (2011). The first philosophical faculty in Saxony up to the beginning of the Reformation in its local, regional, and supraregional context. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):217-240.score: 18.0
    The University of Leipzig was founded in the year 1409. In the faculty of arts - the heart and the basis of the old university as a whole - there were numerous controversies during the first century of its existence. From the very beginning it competed with the older University of Prague, its historic mother, for an independent manner of philosophical thinking. The so-called » Wegestreit « between the via moderna and the via antiqua , and the » Poetenstreit (...)
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  25. David Deutsch (2011). The Beginning of Infinity: Explanations That Transform the World. Viking Adult.score: 18.0
    The reach of explanations -- Closer to reality -- The spark -- Creation -- The reality of abstractions -- The jump to universality -- Artificial creativity -- A window on infinity -- Optimism -- A dream of Socrates -- The multiverse -- A physicist's history of bad philosophy -- Choices -- Why are flowers beautiful? -- The evolution of culture -- The evolution of creativity -- Unsustainable -- The beginning.
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  26. Andrew Loke (2014). A Modified Philosophical Argument for a Beginning of the Universe. Think 13 (36):71-83.score: 18.0
    Craig's second philosophical argument for a beginning of the universe presupposes a dynamic theory of time, a limitation which makes the argument unacceptable for those who do not hold this theory. I argue that the argument can be modified thus: If time is beginning-less, then it would be the case that a person existing and counting as long as time exists would count an actual infinite by counting one element after another successively, but the consequent is metaphysically impossible, (...)
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  27. Osvaldo Pessoa Jr (2001). Counterfactual Histories: The Beginning of Quantum Physics. Philosophy of Science 68 (3):S519 - S530.score: 18.0
    This paper presents a method for investigating counterfactual histories of science. A central notion to our theory of science are "advances" (ideas, data, etc.), which are units passed among scientists and which would be conserved in passing from one possible history to another. Advances are connected to each other by nets of causal influence, and we distinguish strong and weak influences. Around sixty types of advances are grouped into ten classes. As our case study, we examine the beginning of (...)
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  28. Wiland Eric (2013). In the Beginning Was the Doing: The Premises of the Practical Syllogism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):303-321.score: 18.0
    (2013). In the beginning was the doing: the premises of the practical syllogism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 43, No. 3, pp. 303-321.
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  29. David Ehrenfeld (1993). Beginning Again: People and Nature in the New Millennium. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Early in this volume, David Ehrenfeld describes what prophecy really is. Referring to the biblical prophets, he says they were not the "holy fortunetellers that the word prophet has come to signify....The business of prophecy is not simply foretelling the future; rather it is describing the present with exceptional truthfulness and accuracy." Once this is done, then it can be seen that broad aspects of the future have suddenly become apparent. The twentieth century is drawing to a chaotic close amidst (...)
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  30. Michelle Helms-Lorenz, Bert Slof, Carlien E. Vermue & Esther T. Canrinus (2011). Beginning Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Stress and the Supposed Effects of Induction Arrangements. Educational Studies 38 (2):189-207.score: 18.0
    Induction arrangements are implemented in schools all over the world to support beginning teachers (BTs) (novices) in gradually growing into their profession. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into two key psychological processes involved in the work of a qualified beginning teacher, namely perceived stress and self-efficacy. This unfolding is necessary to find a path of influence to lead the way to meaningful support interventions. Support in the form of induction arrangements is hypothesised to (...)
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  31. Markus N. A. Bockmuehl (2000/2003). Jewish Law in Gentile Churches: Halakhah and the Beginning of Christian Public Ethics. Baker Academic.score: 18.0
    Halakhah and ethics in the Jesus tradition -- Matthew's divorce texts in the light of pre-rabbinic Jewish law -- Let the dead bury their dead : Jesus and the law revisited -- James, Israel, and Antioch -- Natural law in Second Temple Judaism -- Natural law in the New Testament? -- The Noachide commandments and New Testament ethics -- The beginning of Christian public ethics : from Luke to Aristides and Diognetus -- Jewish and Christian public ethics in the (...)
     
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  32. E. V. Kryazheva-Kartsieva (2008). Overconfessional Syncretic Mystical Currents in Russia and Germany at the Beginning of the ХХ Century. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:487-500.score: 18.0
    Doubtless interest for a modern science represents the answer to a question on the reasons of passion among intellectuals in Russia and Germany for overconfessional currents like theosophy and antroposophy. The author distinguishes the spiritual crisis like the most important prerequisite of passion for works of E. Blavatskaja and R. Shtajner. E. V. Kriageva-Kartseva compares the activity of different theosophical and antroposophical societies in two countries at the beginning of the ХХ century and draws some conclusions. For example, the (...)
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  33. Mindaugas Maksimaitis & Stasys Vėlyvis (2011). The Beginning of Lithuanian Roman Legal System Research and its Pioneer, A. Tamošaitis (article in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 18 (3):805-820.score: 18.0
    Based on archival documents, regulatory and other official materials, as well as the press of that time, the article attempts to shed some light on the complex beginning of Lithuanian Roman legal system research. Since the beginning of theUniversity law degree in 1922, the Roman law courses (then divided into history and dogma, the system) were taught with an exclusive focus. However, while assembling the faculty of professors at the Lithuanian university, in the beginning they had to (...)
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  34. C. C. W. Taylor (ed.) (2003). From the Beginning to Plato: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume 1. Routledge.score: 18.0
    This first volume in the series traces the development of philosophy over two-and-a-half centuries, from Thales at the beginning of the sixth century BC to the death of Plato in 347 BC.
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  35. Richard Double (1999). Beginning Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Beginning Philosophy offers students and general readers a uniquely straightforward yet challenging introduction to fundamental philosophical problems. Readily accessible to novices yet rich enough for more experienced readers, it combines serious investigation across a wide range of subjects in analytic philosophy with a clear, user-friendly writing style. Topics include logic and reasoning, the theory of knowledge, the nature of the external world, the mind/body problem, normative ethics, metaethics, free will, the existence of God, and the problem of evil. A (...)
     
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  36. Jason T. Eberl (2009). Thomism and the Beginning of Personhood. In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 18.0
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  37. Volker H. Schmidt (2007). Into the Second Millennium: Modernity at the Beginning of the 21st Century. In , Modernity at the Beginning of the 21st Century. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 1--9.score: 18.0
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  38. William A. Wallace (2009). St. Thomas on the Beginning and Ending of Human Life. In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 18.0
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  39. Jiyuan Yu (2005). The Beginning of Ethics: Confucius and Socrates. Asian Philosophy 15 (2):173 – 189.score: 16.0
    The paper is an effort to better understand, through a comparison, how Confucius and Socrates initate their ethical inquiries that have laid down, respectively, the foundations of Chinese and Western ethics. Since both Confucius and Socrates claim to have a divine mission to undertake their investigations, the paper focuses on the issue about how religion and rational philosophy are related when ethics begins. It shows that both have serious religious belief, yet each has secular rational grounds for doing (...)
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  40. Gregor Damschen, Alfonso Gómez-Lobo & Dieter Schönecker (2006). Sixteen Days? A Reply to B. Smith and B. Brogaard on the Beginning of Human Individuals. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (2):165 – 175.score: 16.0
    When does a human being begin to exist? Barry Smith and Berit Brogaard have argued that it is possible, through a combination of biological fact and philosophical analysis, to provide a definitive answer to this question. In their view, a human individual begins to exist at gastrulation, i. e. at about sixteen days after fertilization. In this paper we argue that even granting Smith and Brogaard's ontological commitments and biological assumptions, the existence of a human being can be shown to (...)
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  41. Anthony Kenny (2006). The Beginning of Individual Human Life. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:29-38.score: 16.0
    This paper explores the issue of when human life begins, giving special attention to the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas. Aquinas’s position is contrasted with the position defended by many Catholics today. After considering the evidence and a variety of arguments, the paper suggests that the individuated human being begins to exist at roughly fourteen days after the moment of conception.
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  42. Mohammed Ghaly (2012). The Beginning of Human Life: Islamic Bioethical Perspectives. Zygon 47 (1):175-213.score: 16.0
    Abstract. In January 1985, about 80 Muslim religious scholars and biomedical scientists gathered in a symposium held in Kuwait to discuss the broad question “When does human life begin?” This article argues that this symposium is one of the milestones in the field of contemporary Islamic bioethics and independent legal reasoning (Ijtihād). The proceedings of the symposium, however, escaped the attention of academic researchers. This article is meant to fill in this research lacuna by analyzing the proceedings of this symposium, (...)
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  43. M. Egg (2003). Beginning Novels and Finishing Hamburgers: Remarks on the Semantics of to Begin. Journal of Semantics 20 (2):163-191.score: 16.0
    Verbs like begin may take either a VP or an NP complement, but their meaning is pretty similar in both cases, e.g. for begin, the start of an eventuality is at stake. Pustejovsky's approach captures this similarity in terms of an invariant meaning of the verb, which entails a process of reinterpretation for the transitive variant of the verb. I will show that while the intuitions of this proposal are on the right track, its actual implementation suffers from a number (...)
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  44. J. L. Schellenberg (2011). Skepticism as the Beginning of Religion. In Ingolf Dalferth (ed.), Skeptical Faith. Mohr Siebeck.score: 15.0
  45. Willem B. Drees (1991). Quantum Cosmologies and the "Beginning". Zygon 26 (3):373-396.score: 15.0
  46. Gerrit Smith & Robert Weingard (1990). Quantum Cosmology and the Beginning of the Universe. Philosophy of Science 57 (4):663-667.score: 15.0
    In this note a recently developed quantum oscillating finite space cosmological model is described. The principle novelty of the model is that there is a quantum blurring of the classical singularity between cycles, instead of a singularity free bounce. Recently, Quentin Smith (1988) has argued that present theoretical and observational evidence justifies the belief that the past history of the universe is finite. The relevance of this cosmological model to Smith's arguments is discussed.
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  47. Michel Foucault (1993). About the Beginning of the Hermeneutics of the Self: Two Lectures at Dartmouth. Political Theory 21 (2):198-227.score: 15.0
  48. Jayant V. Narlikar (1992). The Concepts of "Beginning" and "Creation" in Cosmology. Philosophy of Science 59 (3):361-371.score: 15.0
    The paper is inspired by the arguments raised recently by Grunbaum criticizing the current approaches of many cosmologists to the problem of spacetime singularity, matter creation and the origin of the universe. While agreeing with him that the currently favored cosmological ideas do not indicate the biblical notion of divine creation ex nihilo, I present my viewpoint on the same issues, which differs considerably from Grunbaum's. First I show that the symmetry principle which leads to the conservation law of energy (...)
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  49. Nikolay Milkov (2004). G. E. Moore and the Greifswald Objectivists on the Given and the Beginning of Analytic Philosophy. Axiomathes 14 (4):361-379.score: 15.0
    Shortly before G. E. Moore wrote down the formative for the early analytic philosophy lectures on Some Main Problems of Philosophy (1910–1911), he had become acquainted with two books which influenced his thought: (1) a book by Husserl's pupil August Messer and (2) a book by the Greifswald objectivist Dimitri Michaltschew. Central to Michaltschew's book was the concept of the given. In Part I, I argue that Moore elaborated his concept of sense-data in the wake of the Greifswald concept. Carnap (...)
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