Search results for 'Behavior physiology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging (...)
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  2. António M. Fernandes, Kandice Fero, Wolfgang Driever & Harold A. Burgess (2013). Enlightening the Brain: Linking Deep Brain Photoreception with Behavior and Physiology. Bioessays 35 (9):775-779.score: 84.0
  3. Robert C. Cummins (1977). Programs in the Explanation of Behavior. Philosophy of Science 44 (June):269-87.score: 78.0
    The purpose of this paper is to set forth a sense in which programs can and do explain behavior, and to distinguish from this a number of senses in which they do not. Once we are tolerably clear concerning the sort of explanatory strategy being employed, two rather interesting facts emerge; (1) though it is true that programs are "internally represented," this fact has no explanatory interest beyond the mere fact that the program is executed; (2) programs which are (...)
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  4. Margaret M. Bradley & Peter J. Lang (2000). Measuring Emotion: Behavior, Feeling, and Physiology. In Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press. 25--49.score: 72.0
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  5. Peter H. Klopfer (1981). Nocturnal Prosimians Nocturnal Malagasy Primates: Ecology, Physiology, and Behavior P. Charles-Dominique H. M. Cooper A. Hladik C. M. Hladik E. Pages G. F. Pariente A. Petter-Rousseaux J. J. Petter A. Schilling. [REVIEW] Bioscience 31 (7):532-532.score: 72.0
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  6. Neil Rowland (1981). Feeding Behaviour: Caused by, or Just Correlated with, Physiology? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):589.score: 72.0
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  7. Bernard J. Baars (1999). Attention Vs Consciousness in the Visual Brain: Differences in Conception, Phenomenology, Behavior, Neuroanatomy, and Physiology. Journal of General Psychology 126:224-33.score: 72.0
  8. J. Brozek (1972). Soviet Writings of the 1960's on the History of Psychology and the Physiology of Behavior. History of Science 10:56-87.score: 72.0
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  9. H. H. Feder (1985). Neuroendocrinologists Falter Where Neuroethologists Succeed Hormones and Behaviour in Higher Vertebrates J. Balthazart E. Pröve R. Gilles Neuroethology and Behavioral Physiology: Roots and Growing Points F. Huber H. Markl. [REVIEW] Bioscience 35 (4):252-252.score: 72.0
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  10. Jacques Le Magnen (1981). The Study of Feeding Behavior is “Physiology”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):594.score: 72.0
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  11. T. R. Miles (1985). Behavior, Cognition, and Physiology: Three Horses or Two? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):68-69.score: 72.0
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  12. Victor B. Scheffer (1969). The Behavior and Physiology of Pinnipeds C. E. Rice. Bioscience 19 (11):1042-1045.score: 72.0
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  13. Elliott White (1992). The End of the Empty Organism: Neurobiology and the Sciences of Human Action. Praeger.score: 60.0
  14. Eugen Fischer (2001). Unfair to Physiology. Acta Analytica 16 (26):135-155.score: 54.0
    The paper seeks to refute the idea that physiology can explain at best an organism’s behaviour, outward and inner, but not the conscious experiences that accompany that behaviour. To do so, the paper clarifies the idea by confrontation with an actual example of psychophysical explanation of perceptual experience. This reveals that the idea relies on a prejudice about physiological practice. Then the paper explores some peculiar ways in which this prejudice may survive its refutation. This is to bring out (...)
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  15. M. B. M. Bracke & H. Hopster (2006). Assessing the Importance of Natural Behavior for Animal Welfare. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):77-89.score: 54.0
    The concept of natural behavior is a key element in current Dutch policy-making on animal welfare. It emphasizes that animals need positive experiences, in addition to minimized suffering. This paper interprets the concept of natural behavior in the context of the scientific framework for welfare assessment. Natural behavior may be defined as behavior that animals have a tendency to exhibit under natural conditions, because these behaviors are pleasurable and promote biological functioning. Animal welfare is the quality (...)
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  16. William E. Lyons (1974). Physiological Changes and Emotions. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (June):603-617.score: 54.0
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  17. E. Airapetyantz & K. Bykov (1945). Physiological Experiments and the Psychology of the Subconscious (Translation). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 5 (June):577-593.score: 54.0
  18. Alan M. Turing (1950). Computing Machinery and Intelligence. Mind 59 (October):433-60.score: 48.0
    I propose to consider the question, "Can machines think?" This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms "machine" and "think." The definitions might be framed so as to reflect so far as possible the normal use of the words, but this attitude is dangerous, If the meaning of the words "machine" and "think" are to be found by examining how they are commonly used it is difficult to escape the conclusion that the meaning and the answer to (...)
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  19. B. A. Farrell (1950). Experience. Mind 59 (April):170-98.score: 48.0
  20. William E. Lyons (1980). Emotion. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
  21. S. Wilcox & S. Katz (1981). A Direct Realist Alternative to the Traditional Conception of Memory. Behaviorism 9 (2):227-40.score: 48.0
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  22. Angus Gellatly (2002). Color Perception: Processing of Wavelength Information and Conscious Experience of Color. In Barbara Saunders & Jaap Van Brakel (eds.), Theories, Technologies, Instrumentalities of Color: Anthropological and Historiographic Perspectives. University Press of America. 77-89.score: 48.0
     
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  23. Georges Thinès (1977). Phenomenology and the Science of Behaviour: An Historical and Epistemological Approach. G. Allen & Unwin.score: 42.0
    The value of psychology as a science has been challenged in phenomenology and in other epistemological trends. The main objective of this book is to draw the attention of students of human and animal behaviour to important achievements in phenomenological psychology and comparative physiology which are mostly overlooked, although they offer a genuine approach to subjective experience in relation to behavioural regulations. The work of Brentano, Stumpf, Husserl, Politzer, Katz, Michotte, Buytendijk and many others is analysed from this epistemological (...)
     
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  24. Tania Munz (2005). The Bee Battles: Karl von Frisch, Adrian Wenner and the Honey Bee Dance Language Controversy. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):535 - 570.score: 36.0
    In 1967, American biologist Adrian Wenner (1928-) launched an extensive challenge to Karl von Frisch's (1886-1982) theory that bees communicate to each other the direction and distance of food sources by a symbolic dance language. Wenner and various collaborators argued that bees locate foods solely by odors. Although the dispute had largely run its course by 1973 -- von Frisch was awarded a Nobel Prize, while Wenner withdrew from active bee research -- it offers us a rare window into mid-twentieth (...)
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  25. Andreas Keil & Thomas Elbert (2000). Physiological Units and Behavioral Elements: Dynamic Brains Relate to Dynamic Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):406-407.score: 34.0
    Nunez is to be applauded for putting forward a theoretical brain model. In order to improve any model it needs to be experimentally testable. The model presented in the target article suffers from insufficient clarity as to how new experimental designs could be derived. This is a consequence of neglecting the purpose of the brain, which is to produce effective and adaptive behavior. It might be possible to overcome this drawback by including Hebb-based modeling.
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  26. Michael Domjan, Brian Cusato & Ronald Villarreal (2000). Pavlovian Feed-Forward Mechanisms in the Control of Social Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):235-249.score: 30.0
    The conceptual and investigative tools for the analysis of social behavior can be expanded by integrating biological theory, control systems theory, and Pavlovian conditioning. Biological theory has focused on the costs and benefits of social behavior from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. In contrast, control systems theory is concerned with how machines achieve a particular goal or purpose. The accurate operation of a system often requires feed-forward mechanisms that adjust system performance in anticipation of future inputs. Pavlovian conditioning is (...)
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  27. Max Hocutt (2007). Gordon Foxall on Intentional Behaviorism. Behavior and Philosophy 35:77 - 92.score: 30.0
    "Intentional behaviorism" is Gordon Foxall's name for his proposal to mix the oil of mentalist language with the water of empiricist behaviorism. The trouble is, oil and water don't mix. To remain scientific, the language of behavioral science must remain non-mental. Folk psychological ascriptions of belief and desire do not explain the patterns of behavior identified by behavior analysis; they merely describe these patterns in less scientific language. The underpinnings of these patterns, if not intentionality, must be sought (...)
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  28. Johannes B. J. Bussmann & Rita J. G. van den Berg-Emons (2013). To Total Amount of Activity….. And Beyond: Perspectives on Measuring Physical Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 30.0
    The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss some perspectives on definitions, constructs and outcome parameters of physical behaviour. The paper focuses on the following constructs: Physical activity & active lifestyle vs. sedentary behaviour & sedentary lifestyle; Amount of physical activity vs. amount of walking; Detailed body posture & movement data vs. overall physical activity data; Behavioural context of activities; Quantity vs. quality; Physical behaviour vs. physiological response. Subsequently, the following outcome parameters provided by data reduction procedures are (...)
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  29. Mario von Cranach (1976). Methods Of Inference From Animal To Human Behaviour. The Hague: Mouton.score: 30.0
     
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  30. William P. Bechtel (2005). The Challenge of Characterizing Operations in the Mechanisms Underlying Behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior 84:313-325.score: 26.0
    Neuroscience and cognitive science seek to explain behavioral regularities in terms of underlying mechanisms. An important element of a mechanistic explanation is a characterization of the operations of the parts of the mechanism. The challenge in characterizing such operations is illustrated by an example from the history of physiological chemistry in which some investigators tried to characterize the internal operations in the same terms as the overall physiological system while others appealed to elemental chemistry. In order for biochemistry to become (...)
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  31. Laurence D. Smith (1990). Models, Mechanisms, and Explanation in Behavior Theory: The Case of Hull Versus Spence. Behavior and Philosophy 18 (1):1 - 18.score: 26.0
    The neobehaviorist Clark L. Hull and his disciple Kenneth Spence shared in common many views on the nature of science and the role of theories in psychology. However, a telling exchange in their correspondence of the early 1940s reveals a disagreement over the nature of intervening variables in behavior theory. Spence urged Hull to abandon his interpretations of intervening variables in terms of physiological models in favor of positivistic, purely mathematical interpretations that conflicted with Hull's mechanistic explanatory aims (...)
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  32. Michael Devitt (2008). Resurrecting Biological Essentialism. Philosophy of Science 75 (3):344-382.score: 24.0
    The article defends the doctrine that Linnaean taxa, including species, have essences that are, at least partly, underlying intrinsic, mostly genetic, properties. The consensus among philosophers of biology is that such essentialism is deeply wrong, indeed incompatible with Darwinism. I argue that biological generalizations about the morphology, physiology, and behavior of species require structural explanations that must advert to these essential properties. The objection that, according to current “species concepts,” species are relational is rejected. These concepts are primarily (...)
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  33. F. C. Boogerd, F. J. Bruggeman, Robert C. Richardson, Achim Stephan & H. Westerhoff (2005). Emergence and Its Place in Nature: A Case Study of Biochemical Networks. Synthese 145 (1):131 - 164.score: 24.0
    We will show that there is a strong form of emergence in cell biology. Beginning with C.D. Broad's classic discussion of emergence, we distinguish two conditions sufficient for emergence. Emergence in biology must be compatible with the thought that all explanations of systemic properties are mechanistic explanations and with their sufficiency. Explanations of systemic properties are always in terms of the properties of the parts within the system. Nonetheless, systemic properties can still be emergent. If the properties of the components (...)
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  34. Huib L. de Jong (2002). Levels of Explanation in Biological Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 15 (4):441-462.score: 24.0
    Until recently, the notions of function and multiple realization were supposed to save the autonomy of psychological explanations. Furthermore, the concept of supervenience presumably allows both dependence of mind on brain and non-reducibility of mind to brain, reconciling materialism with an independent explanatory role for mental and functional concepts and explanations. Eliminativism is often seen as the main or only alternative to such autonomy. It gladly accepts abandoning or thoroughly reconstructing the psychological level, and considers reduction if successful as equivalent (...)
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  35. Evan Thompson (1992). Novel Colors. Philosophical Studies 68 (3):321-49.score: 24.0
    Could there be genuinely novel colours — that is, visual qualities having a hue that bears a resemblance relation to red, green, yellow, and blue, yet is neither reddish, nor greenish, nor yellowish, nor blueish?1 And if there could be such colours, what would it be like to see them? How would the colours look? In his article,"Epiphenomenal Qualia,"2 Frank Jackson presents a philosophical thought experiment that raises these questions (though Jackson does not himself discuss them). Jackson asks us to (...)
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  36. Roy W. Perrett (1997). The Analogical Argument for Animal Pain. Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):49-58.score: 24.0
    Philosophical defenders of animal liberation believe that we have direct duties to animals. Typically a presumption of that belief is that animals have the capacity to experience pain and suffering. Notoriously, however, a strand of Western scientific and philosophical thought has held animals to be incapable of experiencing pain, and even today one frequently encounters in discussions of animal liberation expressions of scepticism about whether animals really experience pain. -/- The Analogical Argument for Animal Pain responds to this scepticism by (...)
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  37. Gary Hatfield (2007). The Passions of the Soul and Descartes's Machine Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):1-35.score: 24.0
    Descartes developed an elaborate theory of animal physiology that he used to explain function- ally organized, situationally adapted behavior in both human and nonhuman animals. Although he restricted true mentality to the human soul, I argue that he developed a purely mechanistic (or mate- rial) ‘psychology’ of sensory, motor, and low-level cognitive functions. In effect, he sought to mech- anize the offices of the Aristotelian sensitive soul. He described the basic mechanisms in the Treatise on man, which he (...)
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  38. Justin Broackes (2011). Where Do the Unique Hues Come From? Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (4):601-628.score: 24.0
    Where are we to look for the unique hues? Out in the world? In the eye? In more central processing? 1. There are difficulties looking for the structure of the unique hues in simple combinations of cone-response functions like ( L − M ) and ( S − ( L + M )): such functions may fit pretty well the early physiological processing, but they don’t correspond to the structure of unique hues. It may seem more promising to look to, (...)
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  39. Alan C. Love (2007). Functional Homology and Homology of Function: Biological Concepts and Philosophical Consequences. Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):691-708.score: 24.0
    “Functional homology” appears regularly in different areas of biological research and yet it is apparently a contradiction in terms—homology concerns identity of structure regardless of form and function. I argue that despite this conceptual tension there is a legitimate conception of ‘homology of function’, which can be recovered by utilizing a distinction from pre-Darwinian physiology (use versus activity) to identify an appropriate meaning of ‘function’. This account is directly applicable to molecular developmental biology and shares a connection to the (...)
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  40. Cara Spencer (2007). Unconscious Vision and the Platitudes of Folk Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 20 (3):309 – 327.score: 24.0
    Since we explain behavior by ascribing intentional states to the agent, many philosophers have assumed that some guiding principle of folk psychology like [Intentional States and Actions] must be true. [Intentional States and Actions]: If A and B are different actions, then the agents performing them must differ in their intentional states at the time they are performed. Recent results in the physiology of vision present a prima facie problem for this principle. These results show that some visual (...)
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  41. John Collier, Some Limitations of Behaviorist and Computational Models of Mind.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this paper is to describe some limitations on scientific behaviorist and computational models of the mind. These limitations stem from the inability of either model to account for the integration of experience and behavior. Behaviorism fails to give an adequate account of felt experience, whereas the computational model cannot account for the integration of our behavior with the world. Both approaches attempt to deal with their limitations by denying that the domain outside their limits is (...)
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  42. Dave Elder-Vass (2007). Reconciling Archer and Bourdieu in an Emergentist Theory of Action. Sociological Theory 25 (4):325 - 346.score: 24.0
    Margaret Archer and Pierre Bourdieu have advanced what seem at first sight to be incompatible theories of human agency. While Archer places heavy stress on conscious reflexive deliberation and the consequent choices of identity and projects that individuals make, Bourdieu's concept of habitus places equally heavy stress on the role of social conditioning in determining our behavior, and downplays the contribution of conscious deliberation. Despite this, I argue that these two approaches, with some modification, can be reconciled in a (...)
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  43. Katya Chown (2008). Reflex Theory in a Linguistic Context: Sergej M. Dobrogaev on the Social Nature of Speech Production. Studies in East European Thought 60 (4):307 - 319.score: 24.0
    The development of reflex theory in its Pavlovian interpretation had significant resonance in a wide range of academic research areas. Its impact on the so-called humanities was, perhaps, no less than the effect it had in medical science. The idea of the conditioned reflex suggesting a physiological explanation of behaviour patterns received a particularly warm welcome in philosophy and psychology as it provided a scientifically-based tool for a conceptual u-turn towards objectivism. This article looks into the ways these ideas contributed (...)
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  44. Douglas C. Long (1979). Agents, Mechanisms, and Other Minds. In Donald F. Gustafson & Bangs L. Tapscott (eds.), Body, Mind And Method. Dordrecht: Reidel. 129--148.score: 24.0
    One of the goals of physiologists who study the detailed physical, chemical,and neurological mechanisms operating within the human body is to understand the intricate causal processes which underlie human abilities and activities. It is doubtless premature to predict that they will eventually be able to explain the behaviour of a particular human being as we might now explain the behaviour of a pendulum clock or even the invisible changes occurring within the hardware of a modern electronic computer. Nonetheless, it seems (...)
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  45. Paul Nunez & R. Nunez (2007). Hearts Don't Love and Brains Don't Pump: Neocortical Dynamic Correlates of Conscious Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (8):20-34.score: 24.0
    Human brains exhibit complex dynamic behaviour measured by external recordings of electric (EEG) and magnetic fields (MEG). These data reveal synaptic field oscillations in neocortex at millisecond temporal and centimetre spatial scales. We suggest that the neural networks underlying behaviour and cognition may be viewed as embedded in these synaptic action fields, analogous to social networks embedded in a culture. These synaptic fields may facilitate the binding of disparate networks to produce a behaviour and consciousness that appears unified to external (...)
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  46. Arno Ros (1996). Bemerkungen Zum Verhältnis Zwischen Neurophysiologie Und Psychologie. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 27 (1):91 - 130.score: 24.0
    Remarks on the Relations between Neurophysiology and Psychology. In the last decades of Analytical Philosophy, contributions to the so-called mind-body-problem have been suffering by several serious methodological misunderstandings: they have failed, for instance, to distinguish between explanations of particular and strictly general ("necessary") properties and between two important senses of existential statements; and they have overlooked the role conceptual explanations play in the development of science. Changing our methodological premisses, we should be able to put questions like that of the (...)
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  47. Daniel M. Wegner, The Illusion (Ch. 1).score: 24.0
    So, here you are, reading about conscious will. How could this have happened? One way to explain it would be to examine the causes of your behavior. A team of scientists could study your reported thoughts, emotions, and motives, your genetics and your history of learning, experience, and development, your social situation and culture, your memories and reaction times, your physiology and neuroanatomy, and lots of other things as well. If they somehow had access to all the information (...)
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  48. J. Poolton, R. MasteRs & J. Maxwell (2008). Erratum to “Passing Thoughts on the Evolutionary Stability of Implicit Motor Behaviour: Performance Retention Under Physiological Fatigue” [Consiousness and Cognition, 16, 456–468, 2007]. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):408-408.score: 24.0
  49. Gerhard Roth & David B. Wake (1985). Trends in the Functional Morphology and Sensorimotor Control of Feeding Behavior in Salamanders: An Example of the Role of Internal Dynamics in Evolution. Acta Biotheoretica 34 (2-4).score: 24.0
    Organisms are self-producing and self-maintaining, or autopoietic systems. Therefore, the course of evolution and adaptation of an organism is strongly determined by its own internal properties, whatever role external selection may play. The internal properties may either act as constraints that preclude certain changes or they open new pathways: the organism canalizes its own evolution. As an example the evolution of feeding mechanisms in salamanders, especially in the lungless salamanders of the family Plethodontidae, is discussed. In this family a large (...)
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