Search results for 'Being qua being' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shane Duarte (2007). Aristotle's Theology and its Relation to the Science of Being Qua Being. Apeiron 40 (3):267-318.score: 165.0
    The paper proposes a novel understanding of how Aristotle’s theoretical works complement each other in such a way as to form a genuine system, and this with the immediate (and ostensibly central) aim of addressing a longstanding question regarding Aristotle’s ‘first philosophy’—namely, is Aristotle’s first philosophy a contribution to theology, or to the science of being in general? Aristotle himself seems to suggest that it is in some ways both, but how this can be is a very difficult question. (...)
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  2. Allan Bäck (2004). What is Being Qua Being? Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 82 (1):37-58.score: 123.0
    I offer truth conditions for propositions about being qua being in Aristotle's philosophy. I show that in general Aristotle views expressions of the form "qua S" in "S qua S is P" (or "S is P qua S") as making a claim not about the subject "S", but about the predication of "P" of "S". I develop necessary and sufficient truth conditions for propositions of the form "S qua S is P". Finally, I show how this analysis satisfactorily (...)
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  3. Daniel D. De Haan (forthcoming). A Mereological Construal of the Primary Notions Being and Thing in Avicenna and Aquinas in Advance. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.score: 102.0
    This study has two goals: first, to show that Avicenna’s account of being and thing significantly influenced Aquinas’s doctrine of the primary notions; second, to establish the value of adopting a mereological construal of these primary notions in the metaphysics of Avicenna and Aquinas. I begin with an explication of the mereological construal of the primary notions that casts these notions in terms of wholes and parts. Being and thing refer to the same entitative whole and have the (...)
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  4. Martin Henn (2002). What Kind of Universal is Being Qua Being in the Aristotelian Metaphysics? Journal of Philosophical Research 27:173-199.score: 99.0
    This essay attempts to redefine the role and functioning of Aristotle’s πρός έν universals in a way that reveals the structural and thematic unity of the Metaphysics. In particular, I argue five points: (1) that πρός έν universals are analogical, but not four-term analogical; (2) things are πρός έν analogous when they share a transgenic λόγος (3) that four-term analogies may foster discovery of πρός έν analogies; (4) that analogy reveals God as supremely One and Universal; and (5) that the (...)
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  5. John G. Stevenson (1975). Being "Qua" Being. Apeiron 9 (2):42 - 50.score: 99.0
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  6. R. M. Martin (1981). Being Qua Being: A Theory of Identity, Existence, and Predication. Philosophical Topics 12 (1):258-260.score: 99.0
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  7. Philip Merlan (1968). On the Terms 'Metaphysics' and 'Being-Qua-Being'. The Monist 52 (2):174-194.score: 99.0
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  8. Michael Slote & Panayot Butchvarov (1980). Being Qua Being: A Theory of Identity, Existence, and Predication. Philosophical Quarterly 30 (119):168.score: 99.0
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  9. Martha Husain (1981). The Multiplicity in Unity of Being Qua Being in Aristotle's Pros Hen Equivocity. New Scholasticism 55 (2):208-218.score: 99.0
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  10. R. M. Martin (1981). Being Qua Being. Philosophical Topics 12 (1):258-260.score: 99.0
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  11. Joseph W. Koterski (1980). Being Qua Being: A Theory of Identity, Existence, and Predication. By Panayot Butchvarov. The Modern Schoolman 57 (3):271-272.score: 99.0
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  12. R. S. Woolhouse (1981). Being Qua Being. Philosophical Books 22 (1):27-29.score: 99.0
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  13. Kyle Fraser (2002). Demonstrative Science and the Science of Being Qua Being. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 23:43-81.score: 99.0
     
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  14. Edward Halper (1987). Being Qua Being in Metaphysics G. Elenchos 8.score: 99.0
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  15. Robert Pippin Has Recognized That Marcuse (1985). Is Working with a Nonconventional Definition of Ontology in His Early Writings; Not, However, One That is Without Precedence in the Philosophical Tradition. Pippin Points Out That Prior to Modern Times, in Addition to the Common Understanding of Ontology as the Investigation of Being Qua Being, There Also Existed a Lesser Known Ontological Tradition That Sought to Determine the Basis of Beings, the Ultimate Source on Which Being Depended. Heidegger's and Marcuse's Conception of Ontology is More Closely Related to the Latter Than the Former Tradition. See “Marcuse on Hegel and Historicity,”. [REVIEW] Philosophical Forum 16:181-82.score: 99.0
     
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  16. U. S. (1980). Being Qua Being. Review of Metaphysics 33 (3):620-621.score: 99.0
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  17. T. Parent (2013). Ontic Terms and Metaontology, Or: On What There Actually Is. Philosophical Studies (2):1-16.score: 68.0
    Terms such as ‘exist’, ‘actual’, etc., (hereafter, “ontic terms”) are recognized as having uses that are not ontologically committing, in addition to the usual commissive uses. (Consider, e.g., the Platonic and the neutral readings of ‘There is an even prime’.) In this paper, I identify five different noncommissive uses for ontic terms, and (by a kind of via negativa) attempt to define the commissive use, focusing on ‘actual’ as my example. The problem, however, is that the resulting definiens for the (...)
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  18. John Bishop (2007). How a Modest Fideism May Constrain Theistic Commitments: Exploring an Alternative to Classical Theism. Philosophia 35 (3-4):387-402.score: 60.0
    On the assumption that theistic religious commitment takes place in the face of evidential ambiguity, the question arises under what conditions it is permissible to make a doxastic venture beyond one’s evidence in favour of a religious proposition. In this paper I explore the implications for orthodox theistic commitment of adopting, in answer to that question, a modest, moral coherentist, fideism. This extended Jamesian fideism crucially requires positive ethical evaluation of both the motivation and content of religious doxastic ventures. I (...)
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  19. Simon J. Evnine (2009). Constitution and Qua Objects in the Ontology of Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):203-217.score: 54.0
    Musical Platonists identify musical works with abstract sound structures but this implies that they are not created but only discovered. Jerrold Levinson adapts Platonism to allow for creation by identifying musical works with indicated sound structures. In this paper I explore the similarities between Levinson's view and Kit Fine's theory of qua objects. Fine offers the theory of qua objects as an account of constitution, as it obtains, for example, between a statue and the clay the statue is made out (...)
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  20. Joseph Owens (2007). Aristotle's Gradations of Being in Metaphysics E-Z. St. Augustine's Press.score: 51.0
    (Book Epsilon): Macroscopic overview -- E 1 (English translation) -- The role of book epsilon in the Metaphysics -- Pure actuality and primacy in being -- Aristotelian sciences and their starting points (E 1.1025b3-1026a23) -- The universality of being qua being -- (Book Zeta): Microscopic investigation -- Z I (English translation) -- The meanings of ousia -- Essential being (to ti en einai) -- "Essential being" and singular thing -- "Essential being" and form -- (...)
     
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  21. Marion Godman (2013). Psychiatric Disorders Qua Natural Kinds: The Case of the “Apathetic Children”. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 7 (2):144-152.score: 42.0
    In this article I examine some of the issues involved in taking psychiatric disorders as natural kinds. I begin by introducing a permissive model of natural kind-hood that at least prima facie seems to allow psychiatric disorders to be natural kinds. The model, however, hinges on there in principle being some grounding that is shared by all members of a kind, which explain all or most of the additional shared projectible properties. This leads us to the following question: what (...)
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  22. Konrad Werner (2013). The Many Faces of Psychoontology. Axiomathes 23 (3):525-542.score: 42.0
    Psychoontology is a philosophical theory of the cognizing subject and various related matters. In this article. I present two approaches to the discipline—the first proposed by Jerzy Perzanowski, the second by Jesse Prinz and Yoram Hazony. I then undertake to bring these into unity using certain ideas from Husserl and Frege. Applying the functor qua, psychoontology can be described as a discipline concerned with: (a) the cognizing subject qua being—this leads to the question: what kind of being is (...)
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  23. Morten Tønnessen (2010). Steps to a Semiotics of Being. Biosemiotics 3 (3):375-392.score: 42.0
    The following points, which represent a path to a semiotics of being, are pertinent to various sub-fields at the conjunction of semiotics of nature (biosemiotics, ecosemiotics, zoosemiotics) and semiotics of culture—semioethics and existential semiotics included. 1) Semiotics of being entails inquiry at all levels of biological organization, albeit, wherever there are individuals, with emphasis on the living qua individuals (integrated biological individualism). 2) An Umwelt is the public aspect (cf. the Innenwelt, the private aspect) of a phenomenal/experienced world (...)
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  24. Henry B. Veatch (1978). Is Quine a Metaphysician? Review of Metaphysics 31 (3):406 - 430.score: 34.0
    The author wishes to discover a way in which the philosophy of w v quine can be described relative to its place in the history of metaphysics. In order to facilitate such a classification, The author distinguishes between the aristotelian notion of metaphysics, As the study of being qua being or ultimate reality, And kant's transcendental approach in which it is admitted that only appearances can ever be described and that things can never be known as they are (...)
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  25. Fabio Minazzi (2008). Preti's Philosophical Thought and His Contribution to A Priori Historization. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 30:31-45.score: 33.0
    TGiulio Preti, born in Pavia (Italy) in 1911 and dead in Djerba (Tunisia) in 1972, represents one of the most subtle Italian thinkers of the latter half of the twentieth century. After graduating in 1933 discussing a thesis about The Husserl’s historical significance, he connected more and more to the Antonio Banfi’s lesson of critical rationalism and he elected him as his master. Starting from Banfi’s The principles of a reason theory (1927), Preti studied in depth the program of historization (...)
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  26. Terrell Ward Bynum (2014). On the Possibility of Quantum Informational Structural Realism. Minds and Machines 24 (1):123-139.score: 33.0
    In The Philosophy of Information, Luciano Floridi presents an ontological theory of Being qua Being, which he calls “Informational Structural Realism”, a theory which applies, he says, to every possible world. He identifies primordial information (“dedomena”) as the foundation of any structure in any possible world. The present essay examines Floridi’s defense of that theory, as well as his refutation of “Digital Ontology” (which some people might confuse with his own). Then, using Floridi’s ontology as a starting point, (...)
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  27. Nicholas Rescher (2005). Scholastic Meditations. Catholic University of America Press.score: 33.0
    Choice without preference : the problem of "Buridan's ass" -- Nicholas of Cusa on the Koran : a fifteenth-century encounter with Islam -- On learned ignorance and the limits of knowledge -- Unanswerable questions and insolubilia -- Omniscience and our understanding of God's knowledge -- Issues of infinite regress -- Being qua being -- Nonexistents then and now -- Thomism : past, present, and future -- Respect for tradition and the Catholic philosopher today.
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  28. Raul Corazzon, Ancient Catalogues of Aristotle's Works: Hesychius and Ptolemy Al- Garib.score: 33.0
    Aristotle's Definition of a Science of Being qua Being Selected Bibliography on the Meanings of Being in Aristotle The Place of Metaphysics in the Ancient Divisions of Philosophy The Peripatos after Aristotle's and the Origin of the Corpus Aristotelicum Bibliography on the Ancient Catalogues of Aristotle and the Corpus Aristotelicum Ancient Catalogues of Aristotle's Works: English studies Diogenes Laërtius, Lives, V 22-27 Hesychius of Miletus and Ptolemy al-Garib Listes Anciennes des Ouvrages d'Aristote: études en français Diogène Laërce, (...)
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  29. Jaroslav Peregrin, Metaphysics as an Attempt to Have One's Cake and Eat It.score: 33.0
    Metaphysics is usually understood as the investigation of being qua being and of its ultimate categories. Given this characterization, it may be hard to grasp why anyone might wish to oppose metaphysics, why anyone might claim that metaphysics ”leads the philosopher into complete darkness” (Wittgenstein, 1958, p.18)? What could be so misleading about the investigation of the most abstract vestiges of being? One source of disparagement towards metaphysics, of course, stems from the relativist conviction that there is (...)
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  30. Richard M. Gale (2010). John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic. Prometheus Books.score: 33.0
    Introduction -- Part I: Growth, inquiry, and unity -- Problems with inquiry -- Aesthetic inquiry -- Inquiry, inquiry, inquiry -- Why unification? -- Part II: The metaphysics of unity -- The quest for being QUA being -- Time and individuality -- The Humpty-Dumpty intuition -- The mystical.
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  31. Alfonso García Marqués (2007). Sentido y Contradicción. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:127-136.score: 33.0
    In Book IV of the Metaphysics Aristotle argues that first philosophy investigates not only being qua being but also the axioms or principles of demonstration. In the same place he establishes which principles are first. The first among these is the principle of contradiction. The thesis I defend in my communication is that the principle of contradiction in Aristotle is not merely formal in the style of modern symbolic logic, but is the constituent law of all discourse. As (...)
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  32. Arkadiusz Chrudzimski (2007). Gegenstandstheorie und Theorie der Intentionalität bei Alexius Meinong. Springer.score: 33.0
    The thought of Alexius Meinong (1853–1920) has a distinguished position within the conceptual space of ontology. He was the first philosopher who tried systematically to develop a quasi-ontological discipline which was intended to be much more general than the metaphysics in the traditional sense. Metaphysics investigates being qua being; and this constitutes only a small part of the domain of the theory of objects (Gegenstandstheorie) as Meinong conceived of it. For – so reads one of Meinong’s most frequently (...)
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  33. Roberto Poli (2003). Formal Aspects of Reduplication. Logic and Logical Philosophy 2 (5):87-102.score: 33.0
    Aristotle’s presentation of ontology advanced at the beginning of the fourth book of Metaphysics is universally known: “there is a science which studies being qua being...”. Needless to say, this is a familiar sentence: unfortunately, it is also quite an odd one. Why Aristotle does not simply say that ontology is the theory of being? Is there any difference between ‘theory of being’ and ‘theory of being qua being’? In brief, the problem is to (...)
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  34. Henry Veatch (1961). Matrix, Matter, and Method in Metaphysics. Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):581 - 600.score: 33.0
    Taking metaphysics in its aristotelian sense to mean the investigation of being qua being, The author contends that its "matrix" (its place of origin, Field of operations, And continuing and ultimate point of reference) is everyday life, Characterized by its practical or existential inescapability. He then examines the charge that the truths of metaphysics illegitimately claim to be both necessary and factual, And argues in response that the objection rests upon a confusion of the character of one's intentional (...)
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  35. Julia Tao Lai Po Wah (2007). Dignity in Long-Term Care for Older Persons: A Confucian Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (5):465 – 481.score: 31.0
    This article presents Mencius' concept of human dignity in the Chinese Confucian moral tradition, focused on the context of long-term care. The double nature of Mencius' notion of human dignity as an intrinsic quality of human beings qua being human is analyzed and contrasted with the dominant Western account of human dignity as grounded in personhood. Drawing on the heuristic force of an interview with an elder person in Hong Kong, the insights of the Mencian theory of human dignity (...)
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  36. J. T. L. Po Wah (2007). Dignity in Long-Term Care for Older Persons: A Confucian Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (5):465-481.score: 31.0
    This article presents Mencius' concept of human dignity in the Chinese Confucian moral tradition, focused on the context of long-term care. The double nature of Mencius' notion of human dignity as an intrinsic quality of human beings qua being human is analyzed and contrasted with the dominant Western account of human dignity as grounded in personhood. Drawing on the heuristic force of an interview with an elder person in Hong Kong, the insights of the Mencian theory of human dignity (...)
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  37. Colin Marshall (2013). Kant's Appearances and Things in Themselves as Qua‐Objects. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):520-545.score: 30.0
    The one-world interpretation of Kant's idealism holds that appearances and things in themselves are, in some sense, the same things. Yet this reading faces a number of problems, all arising from the different features Kant seems to assign to appearances and things in themselves. I propose a new way of understanding the appearance/thing in itself distinction via an Aristotelian notion that I call, following Kit Fine, a ‘qua-object.’ Understanding appearances and things in themselves as qua-objects provides a clear sense in (...)
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  38. Alberto Voltolini (2009). Consequences of Schematism. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):135-150.score: 30.0
    In his (2001a) and in some related papers, Tim Crane has maintained that intentional objects are schematic entities, in the sense that, insofar as being an intentional object is not a genuine metaphysical category, qua objects of thought intentional objects have no particular nature. This approach to intentionalia is the metaphysical counterpart of the later Husserl's ontological approach to the same entities, according to which qua objects of thought intentionalia are indifferent to existence. But to buy a metaphysically deflationary (...)
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  39. Cristina Meini & Alberto Voltolini (2010). How Pretence Can Really Be Metarepresentational. Mind and Society 9 (1):31-58.score: 30.0
    Our lives are commonly involved with fictionality, an activity that adults share with children. After providing a brief reconstruction of the most important cognitive theories on pretence, we will argue that pretence has to do with metarepresentations, albeit in a rather weakened sense. In our view, pretending entails being aware that a certain representation does not fit in the very same representational model as another representation. This is a minimal metarepresentationalism, for normally metarepresentationalism on pretense claims that pretending is (...)
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  40. Peter Furlong (2009). The Latin Avicenna and Aquinas on the Relationship Between God and the Subject of Metaphysics. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:129-140.score: 30.0
    This paper examines and compares the ways in which the Latin Avicenna, that is the Persian thinker’s work as known in Latin translation to medieval Christianthinkers, and Aquinas alter Aristotle’s conception of the breadth and scope of the subject of metaphysics. These two medieval philosophers inherited the problem that Aristotle posed in the Metaphysics concerning the relationship between the study of being as being and the natural study of God. Both thinkers reject the idea that God is the (...)
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  41. Ian Crystal (1998). Plotinus on the Structure of Self-Intellection. Phronesis 43 (3):264-286.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that Plotinus offers us a new and interesting account of self-intellection. It is an account which is informed to some extent by a dilemma that Sextus Empiricus raised about the intellect being to apprehend itself. The significance of Sextus' dilemma is that it sets out the framework within which such a cognitive activity is to be dealt with, namely the intellect must apprehend itself qua part or qua whole, both of which according to him (...)
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  42. I. Crystal (1998). Plotinus on the Structure of Self-Intellection. Phronesis 43 (3):264 - 286.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that Plotinus offers us a new and interesting account of self-intellection. It is an account which is informed to some extent by a dilemma that Sextus Empiricus raised about the intellect being to apprehend itself. The significance of Sextus' dilemma is that it sets out the framework within which such a cognitive activity is to be dealt with, namely the intellect must apprehend itself qua part or qua whole, both of which according to him (...)
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  43. Christopher Fox (2007). The Apotheosis of Apotheosis: Levinas's on Escape, Hegel's Unhappy Consciousness, and Us. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):185-204.score: 30.0
    The recent translation of Emmanuel Levinas’s essay On Escape complicates our view of his relationship to Hegel, and reopens the ontological question of escape. The impetus for Levinas’s essay was National Socialism’s effort to reduce subjectivity to being qua biologistic. To resist this, Levinas enlists idealism as an ally. He affirms the idealist subject’s effort to escape being, but denies that it makes good its escape. I challenge this denial by comparing Levinas’s phenomenology of escape with Hegel’s phenomenology (...)
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  44. Myroslav Feodosijeviè Hryschko (2011). A sofiologia de Bulgakov como filosofema: não-ontologia e ontogênese. Trans/Form/Ação 33 (1).score: 30.0
    The text examines Sergej Nikolajeviè Bulgakov’s description of the philosopheme as thoroughly “immanent” (viz., the immanence of man qua being, such that ontology in Bulgakov becomes a conceptual analogue for immanence) and the corollary that such immanence necessarily excludes the problematic of the “creation of the world.” Because of this resolute immanence and the notion that the creation of the world in the form of creatio ex nihilo requires a non-immanent or nonontological thought and concept, the problematic for Bulgakov (...)
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  45. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 29.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  46. Jeroen Mettes (2012). Political Poetry: A Few Notes. Poetics for N30. Continent 2 (1):29-35.score: 28.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 29–35. Translated by Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei from Jeroen Mettes. "Politieke Poëzie: Enige aantekeningen, Poëtica bij N30 (versie 2006)." In Weerstandbeleid: Nieuwe kritiek . Amsterdam: De wereldbibliotheek, 2011. Published with permission of Uitgeverij Wereldbibliotheek, Amsterdam. L’égalité veut d’autres lois . —Eugène Pottier The modern poem does not have form but consistency (that is sensed), no content but a problem (that is developed). Consistency + problem = composition. The problem of modern poetry is capitalism. Capitalism—which has no (...)
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  47. Lucas D. Introna (2009). Ethics and the Speaking of Things. Theory, Culture and Society 26 (4):398-419.score: 27.0
    This article is about our relationship with things; about the abundant material geographies that surround us and constitute the very possibility for us to be the beings that we are. More specifically, it is about the question of the possibility of an ethical encounter with things (qua things). We argue, with the science and technology studies tradition (and Latour in particular), that we are the beings that we are through our entanglements with things, we are thoroughly hybrid beings, cyborgs through (...)
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  48. John Bell, Dissenting Voices.score: 27.0
    Continuous entities are accordingly distinguished by the feature that—in principle at least— they can be divided indefinitely without altering their essential nature. So, for instance, the water in a bucket may be indefinitely halved and yet remain water. Aristotle nowhere to my knowledge defines discreteness as such but we may take the notion as signifying the opposite of continuity—that is, incapable of being indefinitely divided into parts. Thus discrete entities, typically, cannot be divided without effecting a change in their (...)
     
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  49. Susanne Bobzien (2006). Moral Responsibility and Moral Development in Epicurus’ Philosophy. In B. Reis & S. Haffmans (eds.), The Virtuous Life in Greek Ethics. CUP.score: 26.0
    ABSTRACT: 1. This paper argues that Epicurus had a notion of moral responsibility based on the agent’s causal responsibility, as opposed to the agent’s ability to act or choose otherwise; that Epicurus considered it a necessary condition for praising or blaming an agent for an action, that it was the agent and not something else that brought the action about. Thus, the central question of moral responsibility was whether the agent was the, or a, cause of the action, or whether (...)
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  50. Fiona Cowie (1998). Mad Dog Nativism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (2):227-252.score: 26.0
    In his recent book, Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong, Jerry Fodor retracts the radical concept-nativism he once defended. Yet that postion stood, virtually unchallenged, for more than twenty years. This neglect is puzzling, as Fodor's arguments against concepts being learnable from experience remain unanswered, and nativism has historically been taken very seriously as a response to empiricism's perceived shortcomings. In this paper, I urge that Fodorean nativism should indeed be rejected. I argue, however, that its deficiencies are not (...)
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