Search results for 'Belief-policies' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Rik Peels (2013). Belief-Policies Cannot Ground Doxastic Responsibility. Erkenntnis 78 (3):561-569.score: 240.0
    William Alston has provided a by now well-known objection to the deontological conception of epistemic justification by arguing that since we lack control over our beliefs, we are not responsible for them. It is widely acknowledged that if Alston’s argument is convincing, then it seems that the very idea of doxastic responsibility is in trouble. In this article, I attempt to refute one line of response to Alston’s argument. On this approach, we are responsible for our beliefs in virtue of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Paul Helm (1994). Belief Policies. Cambridge University Press.score: 192.0
    How do we form and modify our beliefs about the world? It is widely accepted that what we believe is determined by evidence, and is therefore not directly under our control; but according to what criteria is the credibility of the evidence established? Professor Helm argues that no theory of knowledge is complete without standards for accepting and rejecting evidence as belief-worthy. These standards, or belief-policies, are not themselves determined by evidence, but determine what counts as credible evidence. Unlike (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. L. Jonathan Cohen (1997). Belief Policies. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (3):736-738.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Stephen Maitzen (1997). Belief Policies. Philosophical Review 106 (3):448-450.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard Fumerton (1996). EPISTEMOLOGY Belief Policies. Philosophical Books 37 (2):122-123.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Trenton Merricks (1996). Belief Policies. Faith and Philosophy 13 (3):449-454.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. P. Marshall (1991). Book Review : Belief, Values and Policies: Conviction Politics in a Secular Age, by Duncan B. Forrester. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1989. Viii + 110 Pp. N.P. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (1):94-95.score: 120.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Emmanuel J. Genot (2009). The Game of Inquiry: The Interrogative Approach to Inquiry and Belief Revision Theory. Synthese 171 (2):271 - 289.score: 66.0
    I. Levi has advocated a decision-theoretic account of belief revision. We argue that the game-theoretic framework of Interrogative Inquiry Games , proposed by J. Hintikka, can extend and clarify this account. We show that some strategic use of the game rules (or ‘policies’) generate Expansions , Contractions and Revisions , and we give representation results. We then extend the framework to represent explicitly (multiple) sources of answers , and apply it to discuss the Recovery Postulate. We conclude with some (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. René van Woudenberg (2012). Belief is Involuntary. Discipline Filosofiche 22 (2):111-131.score: 66.0
    This paper argues for the claim that belief is involuntary. Evidence in favour of it comes from various thought experiments. However, other thought experiments might be taken to indicate that belief is not involuntary (thought experiments regarding such policies as the policy to consider only evidence in favour of a claim and to neglect contrary evidence, or the policy to join a group of believers in a claim, or the policy to apply some form of self-suggestion). It is argued that (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Margreet Z. Zwarteveen (1998). Identifying Gender Aspects of New Irrigation Management Policies. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (4):301-312.score: 58.0
    Instead of technological policyprescriptions, the search for solutions to managementproblems in irrigation systems is increasingly soughtin organizational and institutional reforms. Thereseems to be an emerging consensus that water and moneysavings can be brought about by (1) treating water asan economic good; and (2) decentralizing themanagement of irrigation water. Policies based on thisconsensus are being implemented in a large number ofcountries. On the basis of insights derived fromfeminist economics, the paper identifies and discussesgender biases of new irrigation management policies.The paper shows (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Keith Frankish (1998). Natural Language and Virtual Belief. In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), Language and Thought: Interdisciplinary Themes. Cambridge University Press. 248.score: 54.0
    This chapter outlines a new argument for the view that language has a cognitive role. I suggest that humans exhibit two distinct kinds of belief state, one passively formed, the other actively formed. I argue that actively formed beliefs (_virtual beliefs_, as I call them) can be identified with _premising policies_, and that forming them typically involves certain linguistic operations. I conclude that natural language has at least a limited cognitive role in the formation and manipulation of virtual beliefs.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Sheldon Zink, Stacey Wertlieb, John Catalano & Victor Marwin (2005). Examining the Potential Exploitation of UNOS Policies. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):6 – 10.score: 54.0
    The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) waiting list was designed as a just and equitable system through which the limited number of organs is allocated to the millions of Americans in need of a transplant. People have trusted the system because of the belief that everyone on the list has an equal opportunity to receive an organ and also that allocation is blind to matters of financial standing, celebrity or political power. Recent events have revealed that certain practices and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Noël Laverny & Jérôme Lang (2005). From Knowledge-Based Programs to Graded Belief-Based Programs, Part I: On-Line Reasoning. Synthese 147 (2):277 - 321.score: 54.0
    Knowledge-based programs (KBPs) are a powerful notion for expressing action policies in which branching conditions refer to implicit knowledge and call for a deliberation task at execution time. However, branching conditions in KBPs cannot refer to possibly erroneous beliefs or to graded belief, such as “if my belief that φ holds is high then do some action α else perform some sensing action β”.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Pavlos Peppas, Samir Chopra & Norman Foo, Distance Semantics for Relevance-Sensitive Belief Revision.score: 54.0
    Possible-world semantics are provided for Parikh’s relevance-sensitive model for belief revision. Having Grove’s system-of-spheres construction as a base, we consider additional constraints on measuring distance between possible worlds, and we prove that, in the presence of the AGM postulates, these constraints characterize precisely Parikh’s axiom (P). These additional constraints essentially generalize a criterion of similarity that predates axiom (P) and was originally introduced in the context of Reasoning about Action. A by-product of our study is the identification of two possible (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Geoffrey P. Goodwin & John M. Darley (2010). The Perceived Objectivity of Ethical Beliefs: Psychological Findings and Implications for Public Policy. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):161-188.score: 48.0
    Ethical disputes arise over differences in the content of the ethical beliefs people hold on either side of an issue. One person may believe that it is wrong to have an abortion for financial reasons, whereas another may believe it to be permissible. But, the magnitude and difficulty of such disputes may also depend on other properties of the ethical beliefs in question—in particular, how objective they are perceived to be. As a psychological property of moral belief, objectivity is relatively (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Laura A. Siminoff & Christina M. Saunders Sturm (2000). African-American Reluctance to Donate: Beliefs and Attitudes About Organ Donation and Implications for Policy. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (1):59-74.score: 48.0
    : This paper reviews current and suggested policies designed to increase organ donation in the United States and indicates the problems inherent to these approaches for increasing organ donation by African Americans. Data from a population-based study assessing attitudes and beliefs about organ donation among white and African-American respondents are presented and discussed. We pose the question of whether it is reasonable to maintain the existing system or whether we should institute a system that uses policies based on the attitudes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Suzuki Takako (2008). Religious Policy and Local Beliefs Practical Interpretation of Neo-Confucian Rites in Early Modern Japan. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:255-262.score: 48.0
    Neo-Confucian influence in early modern Japan was highly intellectual, indicating that Confucian ideals did not change the nature of Japanese norms of social lives. For early modern Japanese intellectuals, the conflict and contradiction between reality and ideals had always been a source of debate and inspiration. Within the theme of Neo-Confucian rites, the contradiction was highlighted owing to the fact that it included a guideline for authentic ancestral worship and religious policy. Once introduced within the Japanese circumstances of the day, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Alan Tipping (2013). “Troops to Teachers”: Implications for the Coalition Government's Approach to Education Policy and Pedagogical Beliefs and Practice. Educational Studies 39 (4):468-478.score: 48.0
    On taking power the coalition government embarked on what many commentators believe is a radical programme of public policy reform. Under Michael Gove, education policy has become totemic to those arguing that Britain?s classrooms are mired in academic mediocrity and behavioural failure. One policy response by the government has been to propose fast-tracking ex-armed services personnel into schools in England as teachers, especially in inner-city areas. This paper examines the educational and pedagogical merits of this proposal and the underlying beliefs (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jacquelyn Shaw & Jocelyn Downie (2014). Welcome to the Wild, Wild North: Conscientious Objection Policies Governing Canada's Medical, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Dental Professions. Bioethics 28 (1):33-46.score: 48.0
    In Canada, as in many developed countries, healthcare conscientious objection is growing in visibility, if not in incidence. Yet the country's health professional policies on conscientious objection are in disarray. The article reports the results of a comprehensive review of policies relevant to conscientious objection for four Canadian health professions: medicine, nursing, pharmacy and dentistry. Where relevant policies exist in many Canadian provinces, there is much controversy and potential for confusion, due to policy inconsistencies and terminological vagueness. Meanwhile, in Canada's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Robert D. Orr (2007). The Role of Christian Belief in Public Policy. Christian Bioethics 13 (2):199-209.score: 42.0
    It seems intuitive to the believer that God intended through instruction in the Law to define morality, intended to lead humankind to “the right and the good.” Further, God's love for humankind, exemplified by the incarnation, atonement and teachings of Jesus, and empowered by the Holy Spirit, should lead to a better world. Indeed, the Christian worldview is a coherent and valid way to look at bioethical issues in public policy and at the bedside. Yet, as this paper explores, in (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Kathleen M. Boozang (1996). Developing Public Policy for Sectarian Providers: Accommodating Religious Beliefs and Obtaining Access to Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (2):90-98.score: 40.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Tom Flynn (2007). Policy, Ethics, Belief, and Morality. In Paul Kurtz & David R. Koepsell (eds.), Science and Ethics: Can Science Help Us Make Wise Moral Judgments? Prometheus Books. 274.score: 40.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. L. Jonathan Cohen (1992). An Essay on Belief and Acceptance. New York: Clarendon Press.score: 38.0
    In this incisive new book one of Britain's most eminent philosophers explores the often overlooked tension between voluntariness and involuntariness in human cognition. He seeks to counter the widespread tendency for analytic epistemology to be dominated by the concept of belief. Is scientific knowledge properly conceived as being embodied, at its best, in a passive feeling of belief or in an active policy of acceptance? Should a jury's verdict declare what its members involuntarily believe or what they voluntarily accept? And (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Pablo Ruiz-Palomino & Ricardo Martinez-Cañas (2011). Supervisor Role Modeling, Ethics-Related Organizational Policies, and Employee Ethical Intention: The Moderating Impact of Moral Ideology. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):653-668.score: 38.0
    The moral ideology of banking and insurance employees in Spain was examined along with supervisor role modeling and ethics-related policies and procedures for their association with ethical behavioral intent. In addition to main effects, we found evidence supporting that the person–situation interactionist perspective in supervisor role modeling had a stronger positive relationship with ethical intention among employees with relativist moral ideology. Also as hypothesized, formal ethical polices and procedures were positively related to ethical intention among those with universal beliefs, but (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Sandy C. Boucher (2014). What is a Philosophical Stance? Paradigms, Policies and Perspectives. Synthese 191 (10):2315-2332.score: 38.0
    Since van Fraassen first put forward the suggestive idea that many philosophical positions should be construed as ‘stances’ rather than factual beliefs, there have been various attempts to spell out precisely what a philosophical stance might be, and on what basis one should be adopted. In this paper I defend a particular account of stances, the view that they are pragmatically justified perspectives or ways of seeing the world, and compare it to some other accounts that have been offered. In (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jake Chandler (2013). Transmission Failure, AGM-Style. Erkenntnis 78 (2):383-398.score: 36.0
    This article provides a discussion of the principle of transmission of evidential support across entailment from the perspective of belief revision theory in the AGM tradition. After outlining and briefly defending a small number of basic principles of belief change, which include a number of belief contraction analogues of the Darwiche-Pearl postulates for iterated revision, a proposal is then made concerning the connection between evidential beliefs and belief change policies in rational agents. This proposal is found to be suffcient to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Boudewijn de Bruin (2008). Common Knowledge of Rationality in Extensive Games. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 49 (3):261-280.score: 36.0
    We develop a logical system that captures two different interpretations of what extensive games model, and we apply this to a long-standing debate in game theory between those who defend the claim that common knowledge of rationality leads to backward induction or subgame perfect (Nash) equilibria and those who reject this claim. We show that a defense of the claim à la Aumann (1995) rests on a conception of extensive game playing as a one-shot event in combination with a principle (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Fenrong Liu (2009). Diversity of Agents and Their Interaction. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 18 (1):23-53.score: 36.0
    Diversity of agents occurs naturally in epistemic logic, and dynamic logics of information update and belief revision. In this paper we provide a systematic discussion of different sources of diversity, such as introspection ability, powers of observation, memory capacity, and revision policies, and we show how these can be encoded in dynamic epistemic logics allowing for individual variation among agents. Next, we explore the interaction of diverse agents by looking at some concrete scenarios of communication and learning, and we propose (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ryan T. McKay & Daniel C. Dennett (2009). The Evolution of Misbelief. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):493.score: 36.0
    From an evolutionary standpoint, a default presumption is that true beliefs are adaptive and misbeliefs maladaptive. But if humans are biologically engineered to appraise the world accurately and to form true beliefs, how are we to explain the routine exceptions to this rule? How can we account for mistaken beliefs, bizarre delusions, and instances of self-deception? We explore this question in some detail. We begin by articulating a distinction between two general types of misbelief: those resulting from a breakdown in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Samuel L. Popkin (2006). The Factual Basis of “Belief Systems”: A Reassessment. Critical Review 18 (1-3):233-254.score: 36.0
    Converse contended that the ideological disorganization, attitudi?nal inconsistency, and limited information of American voters make them a politically disengaged mass, not a responsible electorate. I illustrate the shortcomings of Converse's line of reasoning by showing that he misread his two most prominent examples of the electoral consequences of his theory: voting on the Vietnam War in the 1968 New Hampshire primary, and public opinion about the 1948 Taft?Hartley Act. In both cases, voters were better able to sort candidates and policies (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. David Hunter (2009). Beliefs and Dispositions. Journal of Philosophical Research 34:243-262.score: 34.0
    This paper is about the dispositional difference that demonstrative and indexical beliefs make. More specifically, it is about the dispositional difference between my believing that NN is P (where I am NN) and my believing that I, myself, am P. Identifying a dispositional difference in this kind of case is especially challenging because those beliefs have the very same truth conditions. My question is this: how can a difference in belief that makes no difference to one’s conception of the world (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Lawrence Torcello (2011). The Ethics of Inquiry, Scientific Belief, and Public Discourse. Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (3):197-215.score: 30.0
    The scientific consensus regarding anthropogenic climate change is firmly established yet climate change denialism, a species of what I call pseudoskepticism, is on the rise in industrial nations most responsible for climate change. Such denialism suggests the need for a robust ethics of inquiry and public discourse. In this paper I argue: (1) that ethical obligations of inquiry extend to every voting citizen insofar as citizens are bound together as a political body. (2) It is morally condemnable for public officials (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Melissa Bergeron (2006). The Ethics of Belief: Conservative Belief Management. Social Epistemology 20 (1):67 – 78.score: 30.0
    Some hold that W.K. Clifford's arguments are inconsistent, appealing to the disvalue of likely consequences of nonevidential belief-formation, while also insisting that the consequences are irrelevant to the wrongness of so believing. My thesis is that Clifford's arguments are consistent; one simply needs to be clear on the role consequences play in the "Ethics of Belief" (and, for that matter, in William James's "The Will to Believe"). The consequences of particular episodes of nonevidential belief-formation are, as Clifford insists, irrelevant to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Alan Carter (2009). Philosophy, Social Institutions, and the Ethics of Belief: A Response to Buchanan. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (3):299-306.score: 30.0
    abstract First, Allen Buchanan, in the version of his paper entitled 'Philosophy and public policy: a role for social moral epistemology' that he presented at the workshop on 'Philosophy and Public Policy' held at the British Academy in London on March 8 th 2008, seems to imply that professional, academic philosophers have had little impact upon public policy. I mention an area where it can be argued in response that they have had a more benign, as well as a more (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. David Hunter (2008). Belief and Self-Consciousness. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):673 – 693.score: 30.0
    This paper is about what is distinctive about first-person beliefs. I discuss several sets of puzzling cases of first-person belief. The first focus on the relation between belief and action, while the second focus on the relation of belief to subjectivity. I argue that in the absence of an explanation of the dispositional difference, individuating such beliefs more finely than truth conditions merely marks the difference. I argue that the puzzles reveal a difference in the ways that I am disposed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. J. D. Trout (2013). Democracy and Scientific Expertise: Illusions of Political and Epistemic Inclusion. Synthese 190 (7):1267-1291.score: 28.0
    Realizing the ideal of democracy requires political inclusion for citizens. A legitimate democracy must give citizens the opportunity to express their attitudes about the relative attractions of different policies, and access to political mechanisms through which they can be counted and heard. Actual governance often aims not at accurate belief, but at nonepistemic factors like achieving and maintaining institutional stability, creating the feeling of government legitimacy among citizens, or managing access to influence on policy decision-making. I examine the traditional relationship (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jorge Arturo Chaves (2002). Economic Democracy, Social Dialogue, and Ethical Analysis: Theory and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1/2):153 - 159.score: 28.0
    The purpose of this article is to present in a summarized form a new approach to the ethical analysis of economic policies and to illustrate its importance with a reference to recent experiences of social dialogue in Costa Rica. A general view of the Latin American scenario is presented, with the belief that some of the main problems there observed call for a type of analysis like the one here proposed. In the second place, a brief characterization of this new (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Stephen Rainbow (1993). Green Politics. Oxford University Press.score: 28.0
    Stephen Rainbow assesses the actual practice of green politics in New Zealand using a political and philosophical framework. He argues that the State should take responsibility for developing policies of sustainable development, and that green activists should be required to adopt achievable and credible strategies for change. Through a critique of current models of development and growth which rely on a narrow conception of economic realities, Rainbow suggests possible directions for the future. He bases his arguments on the common belief (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Daniel Whiting (2013). Nothing but the Truth: On the Norms and Aims of Belief. In Timothy Chan (ed.), The Aim of Belief. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    That truth provides the standard for believing appears to be a platitude, one which dovetails with the idea that in some sense belief aims only at the truth. In recent years, however, an increasing number of prominent philosophers have suggested that knowledge provides the standard for believing, and so that belief aims only at knowledge. In this paper, I examine the considerations which have been put forward in support of this suggestion, considerations relating to lottery beliefs, Moorean beliefs, the criticism (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Andrew Dole & Andrew Chignell (eds.) (2005). God and the Ethics of Belief: New Essays in Philosophy of Religion (Festschrift for Nicholas Wolterstorff). Cambridge University Press.score: 27.0
    Philosophy of religion in the Anglo-American tradition experienced a 'rebirth' following the 1955 publication of New Essays in Philosophical Theology (eds. Antony Flew and Alisdair MacIntyre). Fifty years later, this volume of New Essays offers a sampling of the best work in what is now a very active field, written by some of its most prominent members. A substantial introduction sketches the developments of the last half-century, while also describing the 'ethics of belief' debate in epistemology and showing how it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Nikolaj Nottelmann & Rik Peels (2013). Some Metaphysical Implications of a Credible Ethics of Belief. In , New Essays on Belief: Structure, Constitution, and Content. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 27.0
    Any plausible ethics of belief must respect that normal agents are doxastically blameworthy for their beliefs in a range of non-exotic cases. In this paper, we argue, first, that together with independently motivated principles this constraint leads us to reject occurrentism as a general theory of belief. Second, we must acknowledge not only dormant beliefs, but tacit beliefs as well. Third, a plausible ethics of belief leads us to acknowledge that a difference in propositional content cannot in all contexts count (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Kathrin Glüer & Åsa Wikforss (forthcoming). Against Belief Normativity. In Timothy Chan (ed.), The Aim of Belief. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    We have argued against the thesis that content is essentially normative (Glüer & Wikforss 2009). In the course of doing so, we also presented some considerations against the thesis that belief is essentially normative. In this paper we clarify and develop these considerations, thereby paving the road for a fully non-normative account of the nature of belief.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Wide-Scope Requirements and the Ethics of Belief. In Jonathan Matheson & Rico Vitz (eds.), The Ethics of Belief.score: 27.0
    William Kingdon Clifford proposed a vigorous ethics of belief, according to which you are morally prohibited from believing something on insufficient evidence. Though Clifford offers numerous considerations in favor of his ethical theory, the conclusion he wants to draw turns out not to follow from any reasonable assumptions. In fact, I will argue, regardless of how you propose to understand the notion of evidence, it is implausible that we could have a moral obligation to refrain from believing something whenever we (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Clayton Littlejohn (2011). Reasons and Belief's Justification. In Andrew Reisner & Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen (eds.), Reasons for Belief. Cambridge University Press.score: 27.0
    There has been a considerable amount of debate about the norms of belief, but little discussion to date about what the reasons associated with these norms demand from us. By working out an account of what reasons demand, we can better understand the nature of justification.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Dennis Whitcomb (forthcoming). Can There Be a Knowledge-First Ethics of Belief? In Jonathan Matheson & Rico Vits (eds.), The Ethics of Belief: Individual and Social. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    This article critically examines numerous attempts to build a knowledge-first ethics of belief.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David Papineau (forthcoming). There Are No Norms of Belief. In T. Chan (ed.), The Aim of Belief.score: 25.0
    This paper argues that there is no distinctive species of normativity attaching to the adoption of beliefs.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Lara Buchak (2013). Belief, Credence, and Norms. Philosophical Studies (2):1-27.score: 24.0
    There are currently two robust traditions in philosophy dealing with doxastic attitudes: the tradition that is concerned primarily with all-or-nothing belief, and the tradition that is concerned primarily with degree of belief or credence. This paper concerns the relationship between belief and credence for a rational agent, and is directed at those who may have hoped that the notion of belief can either be reduced to credence or eliminated altogether when characterizing the norms governing ideally rational agents. It presents a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. David Rose & Jonathan Schaffer (2013). Knowledge Entails Dispositional Belief. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):19-50.score: 24.0
    Knowledge is widely thought to entail belief. But Radford has claimed to offer a counterexample: the case of the unconfident examinee. And Myers-Schulz and Schwitzgebel have claimed empirical vindication of Radford. We argue, in defense of orthodoxy, that the unconfident examinee does indeed have belief, in the epistemically relevant sense of dispositional belief. We buttress this with empirical results showing that when the dispositional conception of belief is specifically elicited, people’s intuitions then conform with the view that knowledge entails (dispositional) (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Andrew Chignell, The Ethics of Belief. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    The “ethics of belief” refers to a cluster of questions at the intersection of epistemology, philosophy of mind, psychology, and ethics. The central question in the debate is whether there are norms of some sort governing our habits of belief formation, belief maintenance, and belief relinquishment. Is it ever or always morally wrong (or epistemically irrational, or imprudent) to hold a belief on insufficient evidence? Is it ever or always morally right (or epistemically rational, or prudent) to believe on the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Andrew Chignell (2007). Belief in Kant. Philosophical Review 116 (3):323-360.score: 24.0
    Most work in Kant’s epistemology focuses on what happens “upstream” from experience, prior to the formation of conscious propositional attitudes. By contrast, this essay focuses on what happens "downstream": the formation of assent (Fuerwahrhalten) in its various modes. The mode of assent that Kant calls "Belief" (Glaube) is the main topic: not only moral Belief but also "pragmatic" and "doctrinal" Belief as well. I argue that Kant’s discussion shows that we should reject standard accounts of the extent to which theoretical (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000