19 found
Sort by:
  1. Robert Frodeman, Dale Jamieson, J. Baird Callicott, Stephen M. Gardiner, Lori Gruen, Irene J. Klaver, Eugene Hargrove, Ben A. Minteer & Bryan Norton (forthcoming). Commentary on the Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ben A. Minteer (2012). Geoengineering and Ecological Ethics in the Anthropocene. BioScience 62 (10):857-858.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ben A. Minteer (2012). Refounding Environmental Ethics: Pragmatism, Principle, and Practice. Temple University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kirsten M. Parris, Sarah C. McCall, Michael A. McCarthy, Ben A. Minteer, Katie Steele, Sarah Bekessy & Fabien Medvecky (2010). Assessing Ethical Trade-Offs in Ecological Field Studies. Journal of Applied Ecology 47 (1):227-234.
    Summary 1. Ecologists and conservation biologists consider many issues when designing a field study, such as the expected value of the data, the interests of the study species, the welfare of individual organisms and the cost of the project. These different issues or values often conflict; however, neither animal ethics nor environmental ethics provides practical guidance on how to assess trade-offs between them. -/- 2. We developed a decision framework for considering trade-offs between values in ecological research, drawing on the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ben A. Minteer (ed.) (2009). Nature in Common?: Environmental Ethics and the Contested Foundations of Environmental Policy. Temple University Press.
    This important book brings together leading environmental thinkers to debate a central conflict within environmental philosophy: Should we appreciate nature ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ben A. Minteer (2009). Unity Among Environmentalists? Debating the Values-Policy Link in Environmental Ethics. In , Nature in Common?: Environmental Ethics and the Contested Foundations of Environmental Policy. Temple University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ben A. Minteer (2008). Biocentric Farming? Environmental Ethics 30 (4):341-359.
    Most environmental ethicists adhere to a standard intellectual history of the field, one that explains and justifies the dominant commitments to nonanthropocentrism, moral dualism, and wilderness/wildlife preservation. Yet this narrative—which finds strong support in the work of first generation environmental historians—is at best incomplete. It has tended to ignore those philosophical projects and thinkers in the American environmental tradition that challenge the received history and the established conceptual categories and arguments of environmental ethics. One such figure is the agrarian thinker, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ben A. Minteer & James P. Collins (2008). From Environmental to Ecological Ethics: Toward a Practical Ethics for Ecologists and Conservationists. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):483-501.
    Ecological research and conservation practice frequently raise difficult and varied ethical questions for scientific investigators and managers, including duties to public welfare, nonhuman individuals (i.e., animals and plants), populations, and ecosystems. The field of environmental ethics has contributed much to the understanding of general duties and values to nature, but it has not developed the resources to address the diverse and often unique practical concerns of ecological researchers and managers in the field, lab, and conservation facility. The emerging field of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ben A. Minteer, James P. Collins & Stephanie J. Bird (2008). Editors' Overview: The Emergence of Ecological Ethics. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):473-481.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert Frodeman, Dale Jamieson, J. Baird Callicott, Stephen M. Gardiner, Lori Gruen, Irene J. Klaver, Eugene Hargrove, Ben A. Minteer, Bryan Norton, Clare Palmer, Holmes Rolston, Ricardo Rozzi, James P. Sterba, William M. Throop & Victoria Davion (2007). Commentary on the Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):117 - 150.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ben A. Minteer (2007). The Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):132-133.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ben A. Minteer & Elizabeth A. Corley (2007). Conservation or Preservation? A Qualitative Study of the Conceptual Foundations of Natural Resource Management. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (4):307-333.
    Few disputes in the annals of US environmentalism enjoy the pedigree of the conservation-preservation debate. Yet, although many scholars have written extensively on the meaning and history of conservation and preservation in American environmental thought and practice, the resonance of these concepts outside the academic literature has not been sufficiently examined. Given the significance of the ideals of conservation and preservation in the justification of environmental policy and management, however, we believe that a more detailed analysis of the real-world use (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ben A. Minteer (2005). Environmental Philosophy and the Public Interest: A Pragmatic Reconciliation. Environmental Values 14 (1):37 - 60.
    Most environmental philosophers have had little use for 'conventional' philosophical and political thought. This is unfortunate, because these traditions can greatly contribute to environmental ethics and policy discussions. One mainstream concept of potential value for environmental philosophy is the notion of the public interest. Yet even though the public interest is widely acknowledged to be a powerful ethical standard in public affairs and public policy, there has been little agreement on its descriptive meaning. A particularly intriguing account of the concept (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Ben A. Minteer, Elizabeth A. Corley & Robert E. Manning (2004). Environmental Ethics Beyond Principle? The Case for a Pragmatic Contextualism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (2):131-156.
    Many nonanthropocentric environmental ethicists subscribe to a ``principle-ist'''' approach to moral argument, whereby specific natural resource and environmental policy judgments are deduced from the prior articulation of a general moral principle. More often than not, this principle is one requiring the promotion of the intrinsic value of nonhuman nature. Yet there are several problems with this method of moral reasoning, including the short-circuiting of reflective inquiry and the disregard of the complex nature of specific environmental problems and policy arguments. In (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ben A. Minteer (2003). Wolves and Human Communities. Environmental Ethics 25 (2):207-210.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ben A. Minteer (2001). Intrinsic Value for Pragmatists? Environmental Ethics 23 (1):57-75.
    Conventional wisdom suggests that environmental pragmatists balk at the mere mention of intrinsic value. Indeed, the leading expositor of the pragmatic position in environmental philosophy, Bryan Norton, has delivered withering criticisms of the concept as it has been employed by nonanthropocentrists in the field. Nevertheless, I believe that Norton has left an opening for a recognition of intrinsic value in his arguments, albeit a version that bears little resemblance to most of its traditional incarnations. Drawing from John Dewey’s contextual approach (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ben A. Minteer (2001). Wilderness and the Wise Province: Benton Mackaye's Pragmatic Vision. Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):185 – 202.
    Benton MacKaye's name is rarely evoked in the fields of environmental history and philosophy. The author of the Appalachian Trail in the early 1920s and a co-founder of the Wilderness Society with Aldo Leopold and Bob Marshall in the 1930s, MacKaye's unique contribution to American environmental thought is seldom recognized. This neglect is particularly egregious in the current debate over the intellectual foundations of the American wilderness idea, a discussion to which I believe MacKaye has much to contribute. Specifically, I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ben A. Minteer & Robert E. Manning (2000). Convergence in Environmental Values: An Empirical and Conceptual Defense. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (1):47 – 60.
    Bryan Norton's convergence hypothesis, which predicts that nonanthropocentric and human-based philosophical positions will actually converge on long-sighted, multi-value environmental policy, has drawn a number of criticisms from within environmental philosophy. In particular, nonanthropocentric theorists like J. Baird Callicott and Laura Westra have rejected the accuracy of Norton's thesis, refusing to believe that his model's contextual appeals to a plurality of human and environmental values will be able adequately to provide for the protection of ecological integrity. These theoretical criticisms (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ben A. Minteer & Robert E. Manning (1999). Pragmatism in Environmental Ethics: Democracy, Pluralism, and the Management of Nature. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):191-207.
    A growing number of contributors to environmental philosophy are beginning to rethink the field’s mission and practice. Noting that the emphasis of protracted conceptual battles over axiology may not get us very far in solving environmental problems, many environmental ethicists have begun to advocate a more pragmatic, pluralistic, and policy-based approach in philosophical discussions abouthuman-nature relationships. In this paper, we argue for the legitimacy of this approach, stressing that public deliberation and debate over alternative environmental ethics is necessary for a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation