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Profile: Ben Bradley (Syracuse University)
  1. Ben Bradley, Doing the Best One Can.
    in Values and Morals, eds. Alvin Goldman and Jaegwon Kim (Reidel, 1978), pp. 186-214.
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  2. Ben Bradley, Language.
    to appear in Cambridge Handbook to Cognitive Science.
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  3. Author unknown, Desires.
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  4. Ben Bradley, Egoistic Concern, Narrative Unity, and the Worst Time to Die.
    Jeff McMahan says it's worse to die as a twenty-year-old than as a baby. I argue that he is wrong, and that in general it is worse to die the younger you are. I show that among other problems, views like McMahan's are incompatible with the idea that there is value in narrative unity or the shape of a life.
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  5. Ben Bradley, Eternalism and Death's Badness Syracuse University.
    Suppose that at the moment of death, a person goes out of existence.1 This has been thought to pose a problem for the idea that death is bad for its victim. But what exactly is the problem? Harry Silverstein says the problem stems from the truth of the “Values Connect with Feelings” thesis (VCF), according to which it must be possible for someone to have feelings about a thing in order for that thing to be bad for that person (2000, (...)
     
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  6. Ben Bradley (forthcoming). Benatar and the Logic of Betterness. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.
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  7. Ben Bradley (2013). Asymmetries in Benefiting, Harming and Creating. Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):37-49.
    It is often said that while we have a strong reason not to create someone who will be badly off, we have no strong reason for creating someone who will be well off. In this paper I argue that this asymmetry is incompatible with a plausible principle of independence of irrelevant alternatives, and that a more general asymmetry between harming and benefiting is difficult to defend. I then argue that, contrary to what many have claimed, it is possible to harm (...)
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  8. Ben Bradley (2013). Intrinsic Value. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  9. Ben Bradley, Fred Feldman & Jens Johansson (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. OUP USA.
    This Handbook consists of 21 new essays on the nature and value of death, the relevance of the metaphysics of time and personal identity for questions about death, the desirability of immortality, and the wrongness of killing.
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  10. Sheena Elwick, Ben Bradley & Jennifer Sumsion (2013). Creating Space for Infants to Influence ECEC Practice: The Encounter, Écart, Reversibility and Ethical Reflection. Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (8):1-13.
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  11. Ben Bradley (2012). Doing Away with Harm1. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):390-412.
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  12. Ben Bradley (2012). Doing Away with Harm. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):390-412.
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  13. Ben Bradley (2012). Fischer on Death and Unexperienced Evils. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 158 (3):507-513.
    Fischer on death and unexperienced evils Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11098-010-9667-0 Authors Ben Bradley, Philosophy Department, Syracuse University, 541 Hall of Languages, Syracuse, NY 13244, USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
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  14. Ben Bradley (2012). Goodness and Justice. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (1):233-243.
    In Goodness and Justice, Joseph Mendola defends three related views in normative ethics: a novel form of consequentialism, a Bentham-style hedonism about “basic” value, and a maximin principle about the value of a world. In defending these views he draws on his views in metaethics, action theory, and the philosophy of mind. It is an ambitious and wide-ranging book. I begin with a quick explanation of Mendola’s views, and then raise some problems.
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  15. Ben Bradley (2011). Narrativity, Freedom, and Redeeming the Past. Social Theory and Practice 37 (1):47-62.
    Many philosophers endorse the view that global or “narrative” features of a life at least partly determine its value. For instance, a life in which the subject redeems her past failures and sacrifices with later successes is thought to be better, ceteris paribus, than one in which her later successes are unrelated to her previous failures. In this paper I distinguish some views about narrative value, including Fischer’s views about the importance of free will for narrative value, and raise a (...)
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  16. Benjamin Sylvester Bradley (2011). Darwin's Sublime: The Contest Between Reason and Imagination in "On the Origin of Species". [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (2):205 - 232.
    Recent Darwin scholarship has provided grounds for recognising the Origin as a literary as well as a scientific achievement. While Darwin was an acute observer, a gifted experimentalist and indefatigable theorist, this essay argues that it was also crucial to his impact that the Origin transcended the putative divide between the scientific and the literary. Analysis of Darwin's development as a writer between his journal-keeping on HMS Beagle and his construction of the Origin argues the latter draws on the pattern (...)
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  17. Ben Bradley (2010). Eternalism and Death's Badness. In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Harry Silverstein (eds.), Time and Identity. Mit Press.
     
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  18. Ben Bradley (2010). Fred Feldman, Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties, and Plausibility of Hedonism (Oxford, Clarendon Press: 2004), Pp. XI + 221. Utilitas 22 (2):232-234.
  19. Ben Bradley (2010). Luper, Steven . The Philosophy of Death . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009 . Pp. 253. $90.00 (Cloth); $28.99 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (2):395-398.
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  20. Arash Abizadeh, Brooke Ackerly, Andrew Altman, Scott A. Anderson, Daniel Attas, Michael Bacon, Marcia Baron, Mark Bernstein, Benjamin Bradley & Nicholas Buccola (2009). Recognition of Reviewers. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (4):457-460.
  21. Ben Bradley (2009). Saving Lives and Flipping Coins. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 3:1-13.
     
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  22. Ben Bradley (2009). Well-Being and Death. Oxford University Press.
  23. C. Fred Alford, Michael J. Almeida, Chrisoula Andreou, Maria Antonaccio, Christopher Bennett, Ben Bradley, Elizabeth Brake, Sarah Broadie, Baruch Brody & Nicholas Buccola (2008). Referees for Volume 5. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5:465-466.
     
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  24. Ben Bradley (2008). The Worst Time to Die. Ethics 118 (2):291-314.
    At what stage of life is death worst for its victim? I hold that, typically, death is worse the earlier it occurs. Others, including Jeff McMahan and Christopher Belshaw, have argued that it is worst to die in early adulthood. In this paper I show that McMahan and Belshaw are wrong; I show that views that entail that Student’s death is worse face fatal objections. I focus in particular on McMahan’s time-relative interest account (TRIA) of the badness of death. Manuscript (...)
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  25. Kris McDaniel & Ben Bradley (2008). Desires. Mind 117 (466):267 - 302.
    It is not at all obvious how best to draw the distinction between conditional and unconditional desires. In this paper we examine extant attempts to analyse conditional desire. From the failures of those attempts, we draw a moral that leads us to the correct account of conditional desires. We then extend the account of conditional desires to an account of all desires. It emerges that desires do not have the structure that they have been thought to have. We attempt to (...)
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  26. J. David Velleman, Jeanette Kennett, Andrew Altman, Christopher Heath Wellman, Mitchell N. Berman, Ben Bradley & Bradford Cokelet (2008). 10. Ajume H. Wingo, Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States Ajume H. Wingo, Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States (Pp. 367-371). [REVIEW] Ethics 118 (2).
     
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  27. Melissa Barry, John Bishop, Benjamin Bradley, Sarah Buss, Ben Caplan, Erik Carlson, John Carriero, Peter Carruthers, C. A. J. Coady & Marian David (2007). The Editors of Philosophy and Phenomenological Research Thank the Members of the Editorial Board and the Following Scholars, Who Have Served as Referees During the Period of October 2006 Through July 2007. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3).
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  28. Ben Bradley (2007). A Paradox for Some Theories of Welfare. Philosophical Studies 133 (1):45 - 53.
    Sometimes people desire that their lives go badly, take pleasure in their lives going badly, or believe that their lives are going badly. As a result, some popular theories of welfare are paradoxical. I show that no attempt to defend those theories from the paradox fully succeeds.
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  29. Ben Bradley (2007). How Bad is Death? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):111-127.
    A popular view about why death is bad for the one who dies is that death deprives its subject of the good things in life. This is the “deprivation account” of the evil of death. There is another view about death that seems incompatible with the deprivation account: the view that a person’s death is less bad if she has lived a good life. In The Ethics of Killing, Jeff McMahan argues that a deprivation account should discount the evil of (...)
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  30. Ben Bradley (2007). Review of Robert Merrihew Adams, A Theory of Virtue: Excellence in Being for the Good. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (5).
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  31. Ben Bradley (2006). Against Satisficing Consequentialism. Utilitas 18 (2):97-108.
    The move to satisficing has been thought to help consequentialists avoid the problem of demandingness. But this is a mistake. In this article I formulate several versions of satisficing consequentialism. I show that every version is unacceptable, because every version permits agents to bring about a submaximal outcome in order to prevent a better outcome from obtaining. Some satisficers try to avoid this problem by incorporating a notion of personal sacrifice into the view. I show that these attempts are unsuccessful. (...)
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  32. Ben Bradley (2006). Two Concepts of Intrinsic Value. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (2):111 - 130.
    Recent literature on intrinsic value contains a number of disputes about the nature of the concept. On the one hand, there are those who think states of affairs, such as states of pleasure or desire satisfaction, are the bearers of intrinsic value (“Mooreans”); on the other hand, there are those who think concrete objects, like people, are intrinsically valuable (“Kantians”). The contention of this paper is that there is not a single concept of intrinsic value about which Mooreans and Kantians (...)
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  33. Ben Bradley (2005). Virtue Consequentialism. Utilitas 17 (3):282-298.
    Virtue consequentialism has been held by many prominent philosophers, but has never been properly formulated. I criticize Julia Driver's formulation of virtue consequentialism and offer an alternative. I maintain that according to the best version of virtue consequentialism, attributions of virtue are really disguised comparisons between two character traits, and the consequences of a trait in non-actual circumstances may affect its actual status as a virtue or vice. Such a view best enables the consequentialist to account for moral luck, unexemplified (...)
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  34. Ben Bradley & Michael Stocker (2005). “Doing and Allowing” and Doing and Allowing. Ethics 115 (4):799-808.
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  35. Ben Bradley (2004). The Nature of Intrinsic Value. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):492-494.
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  36. Ben Bradley (2004). When is Death Bad for the One Who Dies? Noûs 38 (1):1–28.
    Epicurus seems to have thought that death is not bad for the one who dies, since its badness cannot be located in time. I show that Epicurus’ argument presupposes Presentism, and I argue that death is bad for its victim at all and only those times when the person would have been living a life worth living had she not died when she did. I argue that my account is superior to competing accounts given by Thomas Nagel, Fred Feldman and (...)
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  37. Ben Bradley (2002). Is Intrinsic Value Conditional? Philosophical Studies 107 (1):23 - 44.
    Accoding to G.E. Moore, something''s intrinsic valuedepends solely on its intrinsic nature. Recently Thomas Hurka andShelly Kagan have argued, contra Moore, that something''s intrinsic valuemay depend on its extrinsic properties. Call this view the ConditionalView of intrinsic value. In this paper I demonstrate how a Mooreancan account for purported counterexamples given by Hurka and Kagan. I thenargue that certain organic unities pose difficulties for the ConditionalView.
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  38. Ben Bradley (2001). The Value of Endangered Species. Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (1):43-58.
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  39. Ben Bradley (1998). Extrinsic Value. Philosophical Studies 91 (2):109-126.
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