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Profile: Ben Eggleston (University of Kansas)
  1. Ben Eggleston (2010). Practical Equilibrium: A Way of Deciding What to Think About Morality. Mind 119 (475):549-584.
    Practical equilibrium, like reflective equilibrium, is a way of deciding what to think about morality. It shares with reflective equilibrium the general thesis that there is some way in which a moral theory must, in order to be acceptable, answer to one’s moral intuitions, but it differs from reflective equilibrium in its specification of exactly how a moral theory must answer to one’s intuitions. Whereas reflective equilibrium focuses on a theory’s consistency with those intuitions, practical equilibrium also gives weight to (...)
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  2.  18
    Ben Eggleston (2014). Accounting for the Data: Intuitions in Moral Theory Selection. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (4):761-774.
    Reflective equilibrium is often credited with extending the idea of accounting for the data from its familiar home in the sciences to the realm of moral philosophy. But careful consideration of the main concepts of this idea—the data to be accounted for and the kind of accounting it is appropriate to expect of a moral theory—leads to a revised understanding of the “accounting for the data” perspective as it applies to the discipline of moral theory selection. This revised understanding is (...)
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  3.  12
    Ben Eggleston, Dale E. Miller & D. Weinstein (eds.) (2010). John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life. Oxford University Press.
    The 'Art of Life' is John Stuart Mill's name for his account of practical reason. In this volume, eleven leading scholars elucidate this fundamental, but widely neglected, element of Mill's thought. Mill divides the Art of Life into three 'departments': 'Morality, Prudence or Policy, and Æsthetics'. In the volume's first section, Rex Martin, David Weinstein, Ben Eggleston, and Dale E. Miller investigate the relation between the departments of morality and prudence. Their papers ask whether Mill is a rule utilitarian and, (...)
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  4.  24
    Ben Eggleston (2015). Review of Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century. [REVIEW] Utilitas 27 (2):254-256.
    A review of Thomas Piketty, _Capital in the Twenty-First Century_, trans. Arthur Goldhammer (Harvard University Press, 2014), pp. viii + 685.
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  5.  1
    Ben Eggleston (2014). Act Utilitarianism. In Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Utilitarianism. Cambridge University Press 125-145.
    An overview of act utilitarianism: the basic idea of it, historical and contemporary sources, supporting arguments, and objections, with a closing section on indirect utilitarianism.
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  6.  53
    Ben Eggleston (2003). Does Participation Matter? An Inconsistency in Parfit’s Moral Mathematics. Utilitas 15 (1):92-105.
    Consequentialists typically think that the moral quality of one’s conduct depends on the difference one makes. But consequentialists may also think that even if one is not making a difference, the moral quality of one's conduct can still be affected by whether one is participating (even if only ineffectually, or redundantly) in an endeavor that does make a difference. Derek Parfit discusses this issue—the moral significance of what I call ‘participation’—in the chapter of Reasons and Persons that he devotes to (...)
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  7.  63
    Ben Eggleston (2007). Conflicts of Rules in Hooker's Rule-Consequentialism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):329-349.
    Just about any proponent of a rule-based theory of morality must eventually confront the question of how to resolve confl icts among the rules that the theory endorses. Is there a priority rule specifying which rules must yield to which, as in Rawls’s lexical ordering of the fi rst principle of his theory of justice over the second?3 Must the agent intuitively bal-.
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  8.  68
    Ben Eggleston (2004). Review of Alan H. Goldman, Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don't. [REVIEW] Utilitas 16 (1):113-115.
    A review of Alan H. Goldman, _Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don’t_ (Cambridge University Press, 2002), pp. xi + 210.
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  9.  66
    Ben Eggleston (2009). Review of Tim Mulgan, The Demands of Consequentialism. [REVIEW] Utilitas 21 (1):123-125.
    A review of Tim Mulgan, _The Demands of Consequentialism_ (Oxford University Press, 2001), pp. vi + 313.
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  10.  27
    Ben Eggleston (2013). Rejecting The Publicity Condition: The Inevitability of Esoteric Morality. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (250):29-57.
    It is often thought that some version of what is generally called the publicity condition is a reasonable requirement to impose on moral theories. In this article, after formulating and distinguishing three versions of the publicity condition, I argue that the arguments typically used to defend them are unsuccessful and, moreover, that even in its most plausible version, the publicity condition ought to be rejected as both question-begging and unreasonably demanding.
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  11.  47
    Ben Eggleston (2011). Rules and Their Reasons: Mill on Morality and Instrumental Rationality. In Ben Eggleston, Dale E. Miller & David Weinstein (eds.), John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life. Oxford University Press 71-93.
    This chapter addresses the question of what role Mill regards rules as playing in the determination of morally permissible action by drawing on his remarks about instrumentally rational action. First, overviews are provided of consequentialist theories and of the rule-worship or incoherence objection to rule-consequentialist theories. Then a summary is offered of the considerable textual evidence suggesting that Mill’s moral theory is, in fact, a rule-consequentialist one. It is argued, however, that passages in the final chapter of A System of (...)
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  12.  44
    Ben Eggleston (2002). The Toxin and the Tyrant: Two Tests for Gauthier's Theory of Rationality. Twentieth-Century Values.
    This paper discusses David Gauthier’s attempt to refine the theory underlying constrained maximization so that it ceases to have a certain implication that he regards as objectionable. It argues that the refinement Gauthier introduces may be initially appealing, but actually does his theory more harm than good.
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  13.  11
    Ben Eggleston (2013). Paradox of Happiness. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell 3794-3799.
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  14.  27
    Ben Eggleston (2003). Everything is What It is, and Not Another Thing: Comments on Austin. Southwest Philosophy Review 19 (2):101-105.
    To specify the aspects of Austin’s position that I want to focus on, let me start by reviewing some of the things that Austin says in order to characterize ethical intuitionism. He writes, “I take an ethical intuition to be a type of synthetic a priori insight into the necessary character of reality specifically concerning that which is right and/or good” (p. 205), and he adds that he regards “ethical intuition as a source of foundationally justified belief” (p. 205). He (...)
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  15.  24
    Ben Eggleston (2005). Reformulating Consequentialism: Railton's Normative Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 126 (3):449 - 462.
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  16.  22
    Ben Eggleston (2009). The Problem of Rational Compliance with Rules. Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (1):19-32.
    The problem of rational compliance with rules is the problem of how it can be rational for an agent to follow a rule with a purely consequentialist justification in a case in which she knows that she can do more good by breaking it. This paper discusses two ways in which responses to this problem can fail to address it, using Alan Goldman’s article “The Rationality of Complying with Rules: Paradox Resolved” as a case study.
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  17.  15
    Ben Eggleston (2010). Review of Martin Peterson, An Introduction to Decision Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010.
    A review of Martin Peterson, _An Introduction to Decision Theory_ (Cambridge University Press, 2009), pp. x + 317.
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  18.  17
    Ben Eggleston (2004). Procedural Justice in Young's Inclusive Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):544–549.
    In her book _Inclusion and Democracy_, Iris Marion Young offers a defense of a certain model of deliberative democracy and argues that political institutions that conform to this model are just. I argue that Young gives two contradictory accounts of why such institutions are just, and I weigh the relative merits of two ways in which this contradiction can be resolved.
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  19.  11
    Ben Eggleston (2000). Should Consequentialists Make Parfit's Second Mistake? A Refutation of Jackson. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (1):1–15.
    Frank Jackson claims that consequentialists should hold the view that Derek Parfit labels the second ‘mistake in moral mathematics’, which is the view that “If some act is right or wrong because of . . . effects, the only relevant effects are the effects of this particular act.” But each of the three arguments that Jackson offers is unsound. The root of the problem is that in order to argue for the conclusion Jackson aims to establish (that consequentialists should not (...)
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  20.  7
    Ben Eggleston (2005). The Ineffable and the Incalculable: G. E. Moore on Ethical Expertise. In Lisa Rasmussen (ed.), Ethics Expertise: History, Contemporary Perspectives, and Applications. Springer 89–102.
    According to G. E. Moore, moral expertise requires abilities of several kinds: the ability to factor judgments of right and wrong into (a) judgments of good and bad and (b) judgments of cause and effect, (2) the ability to use intuition to make the requisite judgments of good and bad, and (3) the ability to use empirical investigation to make the requisite judgments of cause and effect. Moore’s conception of moral expertise is thus extremely demanding, but he supplements it with (...)
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  21.  4
    Ben Eggleston (2004). Review of Henry West, An Introduction to Mill's Utilitarian Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004.
    A review of Henry R. West, _An Introduction to Mill’s Utilitarian Ethics_ (Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. xii + 216.
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  22. Ben Eggleston, Bind Me to the Mast, and Not Just for a Little While: Comments on Kierland.
    In “The Desire Theory of Claim-Rights,” Brian Kierland presents an analysis of the concept of a claim-right according to which one person has a claim-right against another just in case there is a perfect correlation between (1) whether the second person has a duty owed to the first and (2) whether the first wants the second to do the act in question. I respond by suggesting that in certain cases, including a variant of the case of Ulysses and the Sirens, (...)
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  23. Ben Eggleston (2013). Adjudication. In James E. Crimmins (ed.), The Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Utilitarianism. Bloomsbury Publishing 6-8.
     
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  24. Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (2014). Introduction. In Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Utilitarianism. Cambridge University Press 1-15.
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  25. Ben Eggleston (1999). Review of L.W. Sumner, Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (2):270-272.
    A review of L. W. Sumner, _Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics_ (Oxford University Press, 1996), pp. xii + 239.
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  26.  28
    Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (eds.) (2014). The Cambridge Companion to Utilitarianism. Cambridge University Press.
    Utilitarianism, the approach to ethics based on the maximization of overall well-being, continues to have great traction in moral philosophy and political thought. This Companion offers a systematic exploration of its history, themes, and applications. First, it traces the origins and development of utilitarianism via the work of Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Henry Sidgwick, and others. The volume then explores issues in the formulation of utilitarianism, including act versus rule utilitarianism, actual versus expected consequences, and objective versus subjective theories (...)
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  27. Ben Eggleston (2015). The Number of Preference Orderings: A Recursive Approach. The Mathematical Gazette 99 (544):21-32.
    This article discusses approaches to the problem of the number of preference orderings that can be constructed from a given set of alternatives. After briefly reviewing the prevalent approach to this problem, which involves determining a partitioning of the alternatives and then a permutation of the partitions, this article explains a recursive approach and shows it to have certain advantages over the partitioning one.
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  28. Dale E. Miller & Ben Eggleston (2020). Moral Theory and Climate Change: Ethical Perspectives on a Warming Planet. Routledge.
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