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Benjamin Hale [31]Benjamin S. Hale [1]Ben Hale [1]
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Profile: Benjamin Hale (University of Colorado, Boulder)
  1. Benjamin Hale, Alexander Lee & Adam Hermans (2014). Clowning Around with Conservation: Adaptation, Reparation and the New Substitution Problem. Environmental Values 23 (2):181-198.
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  2. Alex Lee, Adam Pérou Hermans & Benjamin Hale (2014). Restoration, Obligation, and the Baseline Problem. Environmental Ethics 36 (2):171-186.
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  3. Immaculada de Melo Martin, Valentina Urbanek, David Frank, William Kabasenche, Nicholas Agar, S. Matthew Liao, Anders Sandberg, Rebecca Roache, Allen Thompson, Stephen Jackson, Donald S. Maier, Nicole Hassoun, Benjamin Hale, Sune Holm & Scott Simmons (2013). Designer Biology: The Ethics of Intensively Engineering Biological and Ecological Systems. Lexington Books.
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  4. Albert Borgmann, Holly Jean Buck, Wylie Carr, Forrest Clingerman, Maialen Galarraga, Benjamin Hale, Marion Hourdequin, Ashley Mercer, Konrad Ott, Clare Palmer, Ronald Sandler, Patrick Taylor Smith, Bronislaw Szerszynski & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management. Lexington Books.
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  5. Benjamin Hale (2012). The Incompleat Eco-Philosopher. Social Theory and Practice 38 (1):160-164.
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  6. Ben Hale (2011). The Methods of Applied Philosophy and the Tools of the Policy Sciences. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):215-232.
    In this paper I argue that applied philosophers hoping to develop a stronger role in public policy formation can begin by aligning their methods with the tools employed in the policy sciences. I proceed first by characterizing the standard view of policymaking and policy education as instrumentally oriented toward the employment of specific policy tools. I then investigate pressures internal to philosophy that nudge work in applied philosophy toward the periphery of policy debates. I capture the dynamics of these pressures (...)
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  7. Benjamin Hale (2011). Fukushima Daiichi, Normal Accidents, and Moral Responsibility: Ethical Questions About Nuclear Energy. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (3):263 - 265.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 3, Page 263-265, October 2011.
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  8. Benjamin Hale (2011). Moral Considerability: Deontological, Not Metaphysical. Ethics and the Environment 16 (2):37-62.
    Ever since Kenneth Goodpaster published his article "On Being Morally Considerable," environmental ethicists have been engaged in a debate over whether animals, plants, and other natural objects matter morally (Goodpaster 1978). Many, if not most, theorists have treated the problem of moral considerability as a problem of status, arguing that earlier ethical positions have unjustifiably given privileged status to one group of beings over others. They have then proceeded in one of two ways. Either they have appealed to intrinsic value (...)
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  9. Benjamin Hale (2011). Nonrenewable Resources and the Inevitability of Outcomes. The Monist 94 (3):369-390.
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  10. Benjamin Hale & Lisa Dilling (2011). Geoengineering, Ocean Fertilization, and the Problem of Permissible Pollution. Science, Technology, and Human Values 36 (2):190--212.
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  11. Benjamin Hale & Andrew Light (2011). Ethics, Policy & Environment : A New Name and a Renewed Mission. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (1):1-2.
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  12. Benjamin Hale (2009). What's so Moral About the Moral Hazard? Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (1):1-26.
    A "moral hazard" is a market failure most commonly associated with insurance, but also associated by extension with a wide variety of public policy scenarios, from environmental disaster relief, to corporate bailouts, to natural resource policy, to health insurance. Specifically, the term "moral hazard" describes the danger that, in the face of insurance, an agent will increase her exposure to risk. If not immediately clear, such terminology invokes a moral notion, suggesting that changing one's exposure to risk after becoming insured (...)
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  13. Benjamin Hale (2009). Is Justice Good for Your Sleep? (And Therefore, Good for Your Health?). Social Theory and Health 7 (4):354-370.
    In this paper, we present an argument strengthening the view of Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy and Ichiro Kawachi that justice is good for one's health. We argue that the pathways through which social factors produce inequalities in sleep more strongly imply a unidirectional and non-voluntary causality than with most other public health issues. Specifically, we argue against the 'voluntarism objection' – an objection that suggests that adverse public health outcomes can be traced back to the free and voluntary choices of (...)
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  14. Benjamin Hale & W. P. Grundy (2009). Remediation and Respect: Do Remediation Technologies Alter Our Responsibility? Environmental Values 18 (4):397 - 415.
    In this paper we examine the relation between technologies that aim to remediate pollution and moral responsibility. Contrary to the common view that successful remediation technologies will permit the wheels of industry to turn without interruption, we argue that such technologies do not exculpate polluters of responsibility. To make this case, we examine several environmental and non-environmental cases. We suggest that some strategies for understanding the moral problem of pollution, and particularly those that emphasise harms, exclude an important dimension of (...)
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  15. Benjamin Hale & Lauren Hale (2009). Choosing to Sleep. In Angus Dawson (ed.), The Philosophy of Public Health. Ashgate.
    In this paper we claim that individual subjects do not have so much control over sleep that it is aptly characterized as a personal choice; and that normative implications related to public health and sleep hygiene do not necessarily follow from current findings. It should be true of any empirical study that normative implications do not necessarily follow, but we think that many public health sleep recommendations falsely infer these implications from a flawed explanatory account of the decision to sleep: (...)
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  16. Benjamin Hale (2008). Do Animals Have Rights? – Alison Hills. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):379–382.
  17. Benjamin Hale (2008). Open to Debate: Moral Consideration and the Lab Monkey. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):53 – 54.
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  18. Benjamin Hale (ed.) (2008). Philosophy Looks at Chess. Open Court Press.
    This book offers a collection of contemporary essays that explore philosophical themes at work in chess. This collection includes essays on the nature of a game, the appropriateness of chess as a metaphor for life, and even deigns to query whether Garry Kasparov might—just might—be a cyborg. In twelve unique essays, contributed by philosophers with a broad range of expertise in chess, this book poses both serious and playful questions about this centuries-old pastime. -/- Perhaps more interestingly, philosophers have often (...)
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  19. Benjamin Hale (2008). Private Property and Environmental Ethics:. Some New Directions. Metaphilosophy 39 (3):402–421.
    This article argues that teachers of environmental ethics must more aggressively entertain questions of private property in their work and in their teaching. To make this case, it first introduces the three primary positions on property: occupation arguments, labor theory of value arguments, and efficiency arguments. It then contextualizes these arguments in light of the contemporary U.S. wise-use movement, in an attempt to make sense of the concerns that motivate wise-use activists, and also to demonstrate how intrinsic value arguments miss (...)
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  20. Benjamin Hale (2008). Takings. In Baird Callicott & Robert Frodeman (eds.), Encyclopedia of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy. Macmillan Reference.
  21. Benjamin Hale (2008). Technology, the Environment, and the Moral Considerability of Artifacts. In Evan Selinger, Jan Kyrre Berg Olson & Soren Riis (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Technology. Palgrave Macmillan.
  22. Benjamin Hale (2007). Culpability and Blame After Pregnancy Loss. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (1):24-27.
    The problem of feeling guilty about a pregnancy loss is suggested to be primarily a moral matter and not a medical or psychological one. Two standard approaches to women who blame themselves for a loss are first introduced, characterised as either psychologistic or deterministic. Both these approaches are shown to underdetermine the autonomy of the mother by depending on the notion that the mother is not culpable for the loss if she "could not have acted otherwise". The inability to act (...)
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  23. Benjamin Hale (2007). Gavagai Goulash: Growing Organs for Food. Think 17 (15):61-70.
    Recent advancements in stem-cell research have given scientists hope that new technologies will soon enable them to grow a variety of organs for transplantation into humans. Though such developments are still in their early stages, romantic prognosticators are hopeful that scientists will be capable of growing fully functioning and complex organs, such as hearts, kidneys, muscles, and livers. This raises the question of whether such profound medical developments might have other potentially fruitful applications. In the spirit of innovation, this paper (...)
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  24. Benjamin Hale (2007). John Dewey and Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):331–333.
  25. Benjamin Hale (2007). Risk, Judgment and Fairness in Research Incentives. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):82-83.
  26. Benjamin Hale (2007). Review of Ecological Ethics. [REVIEW] Organization and Environment 20 (4).
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  27. Gary Backhaus, John Murungi, Jose-Hector Abraham, Azucena Cruz, Benjamin Hale, Jessica Hayes-Conroy, John E. Jalbert, Eduardo Mendieta, Troy Paddock, Christine Petto, Dennis E. Skocz & Alex Zukas (2006). Ecoscapes: Geographical Patternings of Relations. Lexington Books.
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  28. Benjamin Hale (2006). The Moral Considerability of Invasive Transgenic Animals. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (4):337-366.
    The term moral considerability refers to the question of whether a being or set of beings is worthy of moral consideration. Moral considerability is most readily afforded to those beings that demonstrate the clearest relationship to rational humans, though many have also argued for and against the moral considerability of species, ecosystems, and “lesser” animals. Among these arguments there are at least two positions: “environmentalist” positions that tend to emphasize the systemic relations between species, and “liberationist” positions that tend to (...)
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  29. Benjamin Hale (2005). Experience and the Environment: Phenomenology Returns to Earth. [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (1):101 - 106.
  30. Benjamin Hale (2005). Identity Crisis: Face Recognition Technology and Freedom of the Will. Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (2):141 – 158.
    In this paper I present the position that the use of face recognition technology (FRT) in law enforcement and in business is restrictive of individual autonomy. I reason that FRT severely undermines autonomous self-determination by hobbling the idea of freedom of the will. I distinguish this position from two other common arguments against surveillance technologies: the privacy argument (that FRT is an invasion of privacy) and the objective freedom argument (that FRT is restrictive of one's freedom to act). To make (...)
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  31. Benjamin Hale (2004). What We Want Animals to Want. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):83-85.
  32. Benjamin S. Hale (2002). The Phenomenology of Modern Legal Discourse. Symposium 6 (1):105-110.
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