Search results for 'Ben Siegel' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ben Siegel (1960). Book Review:Religion and Culture: Essays in Honor of Paul Tillich. Paul Tillich, Walter Leibrecht. [REVIEW] Ethics 70 (3):253-.score: 240.0
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  2. Ben Siegel (1959). Book Review:The Structure of Christian Ethics. Joseph Sittler. [REVIEW] Ethics 69 (3):214-.score: 240.0
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  3. Eli Siegel (1957). Free Poem on "the Siegel Theory of Opposites" in Relation to Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (1):148-150.score: 180.0
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  4. Harvey Siegel (1993). Siegel, From Page One. Inquiry 11 (4):17-22.score: 180.0
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  5. P. Yule, Corpus der Minoischen, Mykenischen Siegel, F. Matz, N. Platon & I. Pini (1988). 2. iii. Iraklion, Archaologisches Museum. Die Siegel der Neupalastzeit. Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:257.score: 180.0
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  6. Susanna Siegel (2002). The Role of Perception in Demonstrative Reference. Philosophers' Imprint 2 (1):1-21.score: 60.0
    Siegel defends "Limited Intentionism", a theory of what secures the semantic reference of uses of bare demonstratives ("this", "that" and their plurals). According to Limited Intentionism, demonstrative reference is fixed by perceptually anchored intentions on the part of the speaker.
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  7. Susanna Siegel (2010). The Contents of Visual Experience. Oxford.score: 60.0
    In this book, Susanna Siegel develops a framework for understanding the contents of visual experience, and argues that these contents involve all sorts of ...
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  8. Susanna Siegel, Dialogue About Philosophy in Spanish.score: 60.0
    This is a compilations of short talks presented at a workshop held at Harvard in April 14 on the life of analytic philosophy today in Spanish. Authors include Susanna Siegel, Diana Acosta and Patricia Marechal, Diana Perez, Laura Pérez, and Josefa Toribio.
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  9. Harvey Siegel (1997). Rationality Redeemed?: Further Dialogues on an Educational Ideal. Routedge.score: 60.0
    In Educating Reason, Harvey Siegel presented the case regarding rationality and critical thinking as fundamental education ideals. In Rationality Redeemed? , a collection of essays written since that time, he develops this view, responds to major criticisms raised against it, and engages those critics in dialogue. In developing his ideas and responding to critics, Siegel addresses main currents in contemporary thought, including feminism, postmodernism and multiculturalism.
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  10. Harvey Siegel & John Biro (1997). Epistemic Normativity, Argumentation, and Fallacies. Argumentation 11 (3):277-292.score: 60.0
    In Biro and Siegel (1992) we argued that a theory of argumentation mustfully engage the normativity of judgments about arguments, and we developedsuch a theory. In this paper we further develop and defend our theory.
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  11. Harvey Siegel (1996). Instrumental Rationality and Naturalized Philosophy of Science. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):124.score: 60.0
    In two recent papers, I criticized Ronald N. Giere's and Larry Laudan's arguments for 'naturalizing' the philosophy of science (Siegel 1989, 1990). Both Giere and Laudan replied to my criticisms (Giere 1989, Laudan 1990b). The key issue arising in both interchanges is these naturalists' embrace of instrumental conceptions of rationality, and their concomitant rejection of non-instrumental conceptions of that key normative notion. In this reply I argue that their accounts of science's rationality as exclusively instrumental fail, and consequently that (...)
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  12. Harvey Siegel (1988). Rationality and Anemia (Response to Baigrie). Philosophy of Science 55 (3):442-447.score: 60.0
    In his (1988), Brian Baigrie criticizes my earlier discussion of the rationality of science (Siegel 1985). In this response, I argue that (1) Baigrie misses the point of my tripartite distinction between different questions one can ask about science's rationality, (2) Baigrie's argument that the history of the development of methodological principles is crucial to philosophical discussion of the rationality of science is flawed, and (3) Baigrie's charge that my view is "anemic" rests on a failure to appreciate the (...)
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  13. Tamar Gendler, Susanna Siegel & Steven M. Cahn (eds.) (2008). The Elements of Philosophy: Readings From Past and Present. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The Elements of Philosophy: Readings from Past and Present is a comprehensive collection of historical and contemporary readings across the major fields of philosophy. With depth and quality, this introductory anthology offers a selection of readings that is both extensive and expansive; the readings span twenty-five centuries. They are organized topically into five parts: Religion and Belief, Moral and Political Philosophy, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind and Language, and Life and Death. The product of the collaboration of three highly (...)
     
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  14. Tim Luke, Paul Piccone, Fred Siegel & Michael Taves (1987). Roundtable on Intellectuals and the Academy. Telos 1987 (71):5-35.score: 60.0
    Taves: Let us begin with the claim that universities are deadly to serious intellectual work. The university ethos fosters mediocrity, boredom and gutlessness. It has become a haven for conformist intellectuals who value patronage and status over intellectual quality and challenge. “Radical” academics are no exception; they too have bought into hyperspecialization, empiricism, professionalization, abstract theory, and have become marginal, predictable and politically irrelevant. If such is the case, what are the implications? Siegel: There is certainly a sense of (...)
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  15. Schalom Ben-Chorin (1980). Das Siegel des Hohenpriesters. Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 32 (2):164-166.score: 36.0
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  16. Susanna Siegel (2012). Congnitive Penetrability and Perceptual Justification. Noûs 46 (2):201 - 222.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that it's possible that the contents of some visual experiences are influenced by the subject's prior beliefs, hopes, suspicions, desires, fears or other mental states, and that this possibility places constraints on the theory of perceptual justification that 'dogmatism' or 'phenomenal conservativism' cannot respect.
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  17. Susanna Siegel (2010). Do Visual Experiences Have Contents? In Bence -Nanay (ed.), Perceiving the World. Oxford.score: 30.0
  18. Susanna Siegel (2006). Which Properties Are Represented in Perception? In Tamar S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Perceptual Experience. Oxford University Press. 481--503.score: 30.0
    In discussions of perception and its relation to knowledge, it is common to distinguish what one comes to believe on the basis of perception from the distinctively perceptual basis of one's belief. The distinction can be drawn in terms of propositional contents: there are the contents that a perceiver comes to believe on the basis of her perception, on the one hand; and there are the contents properly attributed to perception itself, on the other. Consider the content.
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  19. Susanna Siegel (2006). Direct Realism and Perceptual Consciousness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):378-410.score: 30.0
    In The Problem of Perception, A.D. Smith’s central aim is to defend the view that we can directly perceive ordinary objects, such as cups, keys and the like.1 The book is organized around the two arguments that Smith considers to be serious threats to the possibility of direct perception: the argument from illusion, and the argument from hallucination. The argument from illusion threatens this possibility because it concludes that indirect realism is true. Indirect realism is the view that we perceive (...)
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  20. Susanna Siegel (2006). Subject and Object in the Contents of Visual Experience. Philosophical Review 115 (3):355--88.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that certain perceptual relations are represented in visual experience.
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  21. Susanna Siegel (2008). The Epistemic Conception of Hallucination. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action and Knowledge. Oxford University Press. 205--224.score: 30.0
    Early formulations of disjunctivism about perception refused to give any positive account of the nature of hallucination, beyond the uncontroversial fact that they can in some sense seem to the same to the subject as veridical perceptions. Recently, some disjunctivists have attempt to account for hallucination in purely epistemic terms, by developing detailed account of what it is for a hallucinaton to be indiscriminable from a veridical perception. In this paper I argue that the prospects for purely epistemic treatments of (...)
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  22. Alex Byrne, David Hilbert & Susanna Siegel (2007). Do We See More Than We Can Access? Behavioral and Brain Sciences (5-6):501-502.score: 30.0
    Short commentary on a paper by Ned Block.
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  23. Susanna Siegel (2004). Indiscriminability and the Phenomenal. Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):91-112.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I describe and criticize M.G.F. Martin's version of disjunctivism, and his argument for it from premises about self-knowledge.
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  24. Susanna Siegel (2007). How Can We Discover the Contents of Experience? Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (S1):127-42.score: 30.0
    In this paper I discuss several proposals for how to find out which contents visual experiences have, and I defend the method I.
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  25. Susanna Siegel (2009). The Visual Experience of Causation. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (236):519-540.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that causal relations between objects are represented in visual experience, and contrast my argument and its conclusion with Michotte's results from the 1960's.
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  26. Susanna Siegel, Misperception.score: 30.0
    In discussions of perception and its provision of knowledge, it is common to distinguish what one comes to believe on the basis of perception from the distinctively perceptual basis of one's belief. The distinction can be drawn in terms of propositional contents: there are the contents that a perceiver would normally come to believe on the basis of her perception, on the one hand; and there are the contents properly attributed to perception itself, on the other. Consider the content.
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  27. Susanna Siegel, The Contents of Perception. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    This is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on the contents of perception.
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  28. Susanna Siegel, The Dog and the Zombie.score: 30.0
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  29. Harvey Siegel (1986). Relativism, Truth, and Incoherence. Synthese 68 (2):225 - 259.score: 30.0
    There are many contemporary sources and defenders of epistemological relativism which have not been considered thus far. I have, for example, barely touched on the voluminous literature regarding frameworks, conceptual schemes, and Wittgensteinian forms of life. Davidson's challenge to the scheme/content distinction and thereby to conceptual relativism, Rorty's acceptance of the Davidsonian argument and his use of it to defend a relativistic position, Winchian and other sociological and anthropological arguments for relativism, recent work in the sociology of science, and Goodman's (...)
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  30. Harvey Siegel (2007). Review of Paul Boghossian, Fear of Knowledge: Against Relativism and Constructivism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (1).score: 30.0
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  31. Susanna Siegel (2006). How Does Phenomenology Constrain Object-Seeing? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (3):429 – 441.score: 30.0
    Perception provides a form of contact with the world and the other people in it. For example, we can learn that Franco is sitting in his chair by seeing Franco; we can learn that his hair is gray by seeing the colour of his hair. Such perception enables us to understand primitive forms of language, such as demonstrative expressions.
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  32. Harvey Siegel (2008). Autonomy, Critical Thinking and the Wittgensteinian Legacy: Reflections on Christopher Winch, Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):165-184.score: 30.0
    In this review of Christopher Winch's new book, Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking (2006), I discuss its main theses, supporting some and criticising others. In particular, I take issue with several of Winch's claims and arguments concerning critical thinking and rationality, and deplore his reliance on what I suggest are problematic strains of the later Wittgenstein. But these criticisms are not such as to upend Winch's powerful critique of antiperfectionism and 'strong autonomy' or his defence of 'weak autonomy'. His account (...)
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  33. Harvey Siegel (1982). Relativism Refuted. Educational Philosophy and Theory 14 (2):47–50.score: 30.0
  34. Harvey Siegel (1989). Farewell to Feyerabend. Inquiry 32 (3):343 – 369.score: 30.0
    It is with some trepidation that I offer this critical review of Feyerabend's new book. I do not relish the prospect of getting involved in one of the nasty little fights Feyerabend picks with those who criticize his work. Nevertheless, Feyerabend's work cries out for critical attention. Of particular interest is the degree to which this new work deepens or enhances Feyerabend's earlier castigations of Reason. Fans of Feyerabend will be disappointed to learn that Feyerabend's philosophy is not deepened or (...)
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  35. Michael Glanzberg & Susanna Siegel (2006). Presupposition and Policing in Complex Demonstratives. Noûs 40 (1):1–42.score: 30.0
    In this paper, we offer a theory of the role of the nominal in complex demonstrative expressions, such as 'this dog' or 'that glove with a hole in it'.
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  36. Susanna Siegel (2002). Review of A Theory of Sentience, by Austen Clark. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 111 (1).score: 30.0
    First, what it is for a sentient being to sense is for it to employ two distinct capacities: one for representing places-at-times; the other for representing "features" (60, cf. 70). Exercised together, the result is akin to feature-placing, which brings us to the second thesis: what sensory systems represent is that features are instantiated at place-times. Accordingly, sensory systems do not, for instance, attribute properties to objects, such as trees, tables, bodies, or persons (163).
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  37. Susanna Siegel (2005). The Phenomenology of Efficacy. Philosophical Topics 33 (1):265-84.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that certain type of first-personal causal property, efficacy, is represented in perceptual experience.
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  38. Harvey Siegel (1999). Multiculturalism and the Possibility of Transcultural Educational and Philosophical Ideals. Philosophy 74 (3):387-409.score: 30.0
    How should we think about the interrelationships that obtain among Philosophy, Education, and Culture? In this paper I explore the contours of one such interrelationship: namely, the way in which educational and (other) philosophical ideals transcend individual cultures. I do so by considering the contemporary educational and philosophical commitment to multiculturalism. Consideration of multiculturalism, I argue, reveals important aspects of the character of both educational and philosophical ideals. Specifically, I advance the following claims: i) We are obliged to embrace the (...)
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  39. Harvey Siegel (1984). Empirical Psychology, Naturalized Epistemology, and First Philosophy. Philosophy of Science 51 (4):667-676.score: 30.0
    In his 1983 article, Paul A. Roth defends the Quinean project of naturalized epistemology from the criticism presented in my 1980 article. In this note I would like to respond to Roth's effort. I will argue that, while helpful in advancing and clarifying the issues, Roth's defense of naturalized epistemology does not succeed. The primary topic to be clarified is Quine's "no first philosophy" doctrine; but I will address myself to other points as well.
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  40. Harvey Siegel (1980). Objectivity, Rationality, Incommensurability, and More. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 31 (4):359-375.score: 30.0
  41. Harvey Siegel (2005). Truth, Thinking, Testimony and Trust: Alvin Goldman on Epistemology and Education. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (2):345–366.score: 30.0
    In his recent work in social epistemology, Alvin Goldman argues that truth is the fundamental epistemic end of education, and that critical thinking is of merely instrumental value with respect to that fundamental end. He also argues that there is a central place for testimony and trust in the classroom, and an educational danger in over-emphasizing the fostering of students’ critical thinking. In this paper I take issue with these claims, and argue that (1) critical thinking is a fundamental end (...)
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  42. Harvey Siegel (2004). Epistemology and Education: An Incomplete Guide to the Social-Epistemological Issues. Episteme 1 (2):129-137.score: 30.0
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  43. Harvey Siegel (2008). Is 'Education' a Thick Epistemic Concept? Philosophical Papers 37 (3):455-469.score: 30.0
    Is 'education' a thick epistemic concept? The answer depends, of course, on the viability of the 'thick/thin' distinction, as well as the degree to which education is an epistemic concept at all. I will concentrate mainly on the latter, and will argue that epistemological matters are central to education and our philosophical thinking about it; and that, insofar, education is indeed rightly thought of as an epistemic concept. In laying out education's epistemological dimensions, I hope to clarify the degree to (...)
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  44. Harvey Siegel (1989). The Rationality of Science, Critical Thinking, and Science Education. Synthese 80 (1):9 - 41.score: 30.0
    This paper considers two philosophical problems and their relation to science education. The first involves the rationality of science; it is argued here that the traditional view, according to which science is rational because of its adherence to (a non-standard conception of) scientific method, successfully answers one central question concerning science''s rationality. The second involves the aims of education; here it is argued that a fundamental educational aim is the fostering of rationality, or its educational cognate, critical thinking. The ramifications (...)
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  45. Harvey Siegel (2004). Rationality and Judgment. Metaphilosophy 35 (5):597-613.score: 30.0
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  46. Harvey Siegel (1992). Justification by Balance. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):27-46.score: 30.0
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  47. Harvey Siegel (1988). Rationality and Epistemic Dependence. Educational Philosophy and Theory 20 (1):1–6.score: 30.0
  48. Harvey Siegel (1991). The Generalizability of Critical Thinking. Educational Philosophy and Theory 23 (1):18–30.score: 30.0
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  49. Harvey Siegel (1980). Justification, Discovery and the Naturalizing of Epistemology. Philosophy of Science 47 (2):297-321.score: 30.0
    Reichenbach's well-known distinction between the context of discovery and the context of justification has recently come under attack from several quarters. In this paper I attempt to reconsider the distinction and evaluate various recent criticisms of it. These criticisms fall into two main groups: those which directly challenge Reichenbach's distinction; and those which (I argue) indirectly but no less seriously challenge that distinction by rejecting the related distinction between psychology and epistemology, and defending the "naturalizing" of epistemology. I argue that (...)
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  50. Deborah L. Siegel (1997). The Legacy of the Personal: Generating Theory in Feminism's Third Wave. Hypatia 12 (3):46-75.score: 30.0
    This essay focuses on the repeated rhetorical moves through which the third wave autobiographical subject seeks to be real and to speak as part of a collective voice from the next feminist generation. Given that postmodernist, postructuralist, and multiculturalist critiques have shaped the form and the content of third wave expressions of the personal, the study is ultimately concerned with the possibilities and limitations of such theoretical analysis for a third wave of feminist praxis.
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