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  1. Josefine Andin, Eleni Orfanidou, Velia Cardin, Emil Holmer, Cheryl M. Capek, Bencie Woll, Jerker Rönnberg & Mary Rudner (2013). Similar Digit-Based Working Memory in Deaf Signers and Hearing Non-Signers Despite Digit Span Differences. Frontiers in Psychology 4:942.
    Similar working memory (WM) for lexical items has been demonstrated for signers and non-signers while short-term memory (STM) is regularly poorer in deaf than hearing individuals. In the present study, we investigated digit-based WM and STM in Swedish and British deaf signers and hearing non-signers. To maintain good experimental control we used printed stimuli throughout and held response mode constant across groups. We showed that deaf signers have similar digit-based WM performance, despite shorter digit spans, compared to well-matched hearing non-signers. (...)
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  2. Mairéad MacSweeney, Cheryl M. Capek, Ruth Campbell & Bencie Woll (2008). The Signing Brain: The Neurobiology of Sign Language. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):432-440.
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  3. Jechil Sieratzki & Bencie Woll (2005). Cerebral Asymmetry: From Survival Strategies to Social Behaviour. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):613-614.
    We describe a possible link between coordinated lateralised group behaviour serving species survival in lower vertebrates and a striking lateralisation phenomenon found in human social behaviour: the universal preference for cradling a young infant on the left side. Our exploration offers a different perspective on the role of cerebral asymmetry for the survival of both the individual and the species.
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  4. Ruth Campbell & Bencie Woll (2003). Space is Special in Sign. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):5-7.
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  5. Bencie Woll (2003). The Neural Representation of Spatial Predicate-Argument Structures in Sign Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):300-301.
    Evidence from studies of the processing of topographic and classifier constructions in sign language sentences provides a model of how a mental scene description can be represented linguistically, but it also raises questions about how this can be related to spatial linguistic descriptions in spoken languages and their processing. This in turn provides insights into models of the evolution of language.
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  6. Bencie Woll & Jechil S. Sieratzki (2003). Why Homolaterality of Language and Hand Dominance May Not Be the Expression of a Specific Evolutionary Link. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):241-241.
    Although gestures have surface similarities with language, there are significant organisational and neurolinguistic differences that argue against the evolutionary connection proposed by Corballis. Dominance for language and handedness may be related to a basic specialisation of the left cerebral hemisphere for target-directed behaviour and sequential processing, with the right side specialised for holistic-environmental monitoring and spatial processing.
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  7. Jechil S. Sieratzki & Bencie Woll (1998). An Evolutionary Model for the Learning of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):530-530.
    This commentary deals with the relation between human language and nonverbal signals used by nonhuman primates. It suggests that human language could have developed through the interaction of procedural learning with a preexisting system for socio-affective communication. The introduction of “content” into existing “frames” requires a neurobiologically plausible learning mechanism.
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  8. Bencie Woll & Jechil S. Sieratzki (1998). Echo Phonology: Signs of a Link Between Gesture and Speech. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):531-532.
    This commentary supports MacNeilage's dismissal of an evolutionary development from sign language to spoken language but presents evidence of a feature in sign language (echo phonology) that links iconic signs to abstract vocal syllables. These data provide an insight into possible mechanism by which iconic manual gestures accompanied by vocalisation could have provided a route for the evolution of spoken language with its characteristically arbitrary form–meaning relationship.
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