14 found
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  1.  5
    Catherine Gliwa & Benjamin E. Berkman (2013). Do Researchers Have an Obligation to Actively Look for Genetic Incidental Findings? American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):32-42.
    The rapid growth of next-generation genetic sequencing has prompted debate about the responsibilities of researchers toward genetic incidental findings. Assuming there is a duty to disclose significant incidental findings, might there be an obligation for researchers to actively look for these findings? We present an ethical framework for analyzing whether there is a positive duty to look for genetic incidental findings. Using the ancillary care framework as a guide, we identify three main criteria that must be present to give rise (...)
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  2.  4
    Ben Chan, Flavia M. Facio, Haley Eidem, Sara Chandros Hull, Leslie G. Biesecker & Benjamin E. Berkman (2012). Genomic Inheritances: Disclosing Individual Research Results From Whole-Exome Sequencing to Deceased Participants' Relatives. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):1-8.
    Whole-genome analysis and whole-exome analysis generate many more clinically actionable findings than traditional targeted genetic analysis. These findings may be relevant to research participants themselves as well as for members of their families. Though researchers performing genomic analyses are likely to find medically significant genetic variations for nearly every research participant, what they will find for any given participant is unpredictable. The ubiquity and diversity of these findings complicate questions about disclosing individual genetic test results. We outline an approach for (...)
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  3.  1
    Greer Donley, Sara Chandros Hull & Benjamin E. Berkman (2012). Prenatal Whole Genome Sequencing. Hastings Center Report 42 (4):28-40.
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  4.  2
    Benjamin E. Berkman, Sara Chandros Hull & Leslie G. Biesecker (2015). Scrutinizing the Right Not to Know. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):17-19.
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  5. Seema K. Shah, Sara Chandros Hull, Michael A. Spinner, Benjamin E. Berkman, Lauren A. Sanchez, Ruquyyah Abdul-Karim, Amy P. Hsu, Reginald Claypool & Steven M. Holland (2013). What Does the Duty to Warn Require? American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):62 - 63.
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  6.  5
    Benjamin E. Berkman & Sara Chandros Hull (2014). The “Right Not to Know” in the Genomic Era: Time to Break From Tradition? American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):28-31.
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  7.  1
    Benjamin E. Berkman & Karen H. Rothenberg (2012). Teaching Health Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):147-153.
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  8.  7
    Sara Chandros Hull, Ben Chan, Leslie G. Biesecker & Benjamin E. Berkman (2012). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Genomic Inheritances: Disclosing Individual Research Results From Whole-Exome Sequencing to Deceased Participants' Relatives”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):W9-W10.
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  9.  3
    Catherine Gliwa & Benjamin E. Berkman (2013). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Do Researchers Have an Obligation to Actively Look for Genetic Incidental Findings?”. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):W10 - W11.
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  10.  3
    Lisa Eckstein, Jeremy R. Garrett & Benjamin E. Berkman (2014). A Framework for Analyzing the Ethics of Disclosing Genetic Research Findings. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42 (2):190-207.
    Whether researchers have an obligation to disclose secondary genetic research findings, and, if so, in what circumstances, remains a matter of heated debate. This paper suggests that much of this confusion is definitional or conceptual in nature. That is, there is significant variability in the way that threshold terms and concepts such as “incidental,” “analytic validity,” “clinical validity,” “clinical relevance,” “clinical utility,” “clinical significance,” and “actionability,” are used in the literature, which is impeding efforts to clarify the scope of an (...)
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  11.  4
    Benjamin E. Berkman & Karen H. Rothenberg (2012). Teaching Health Law. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (1):147-153.
  12. Lisa Eckstein, Jeremy R. Garrett & Benjamin E. Berkman (2014). A Framework for Analyzing the Ethics of Disclosing Genetic Research Findings. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (2):190-207.
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  13. Amulya Mandava, Joseph Millum & Benjamin E. Berkman (2015). When Should Genome Researchers Disclose Misattributed Pahentage? Hastings Center Report 45 (4):28-36.
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  14. Anya E. R. Prince & Benjamin E. Berkman (2012). When Does an Illness Begin: Genetic Discrimination and Disease Manifestation. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):655-664.
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