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Benjamin Hippen [8]Benjamin E. Hippen [3]
  1. Laurence B. McCullough, Frank A. Chervenak, Robert L. Brent & Benjamin Hippen (2013). Normalizing Atypical Genitalia: How a Heated Debate Went Astray (Vol 42, Pg 32, 2012). Hastings Center Report 43 (1):7-7.
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  2. Benjamin E. Hippen (2012). Review of F. G. Miller and R. D. Truog,Death, Dying and Organ Transplantation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):56-58.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 56-58, June 2012.
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  3. Robert L. Brent, Frank A. Chervenak, Laurence B. McCullough & Benjamin Hippen (2010). A Case Study in Unethical Transgressive Bioethics: “Letter of Concern From Bioethicists” About the Prenatal Administration of Dexamethasone. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (9):35-45.
    On February 3, 2010, a “Letter of Concern from Bioethicists,” organized by fetaldex.org, was sent to report suspected violations of the ethics of human subjects research in the off-label use of dexamethasone during pregnancy by Dr. Maria New. Copies of this letter were submitted to the FDA Office of Pediatric Therapeutics, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office for Human Research Protections, and three universities where Dr. New has held or holds appointments. We provide a critical appraisal of (...)
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  4. Benjamin Hippen (2010). Professional Obligation and Supererogation With Reference to the Transplant Tourist. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):14-16.
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  5. Benjamin Hippen, Robert L. Brent, Frank A. Chervenak & Laurence B. McCullough (2010). A Case Study in Unethical Transgressive Bioethics: “Letter of Concern From Bioethicists” About the Prenatal Administration of Dexamethasone. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (9):35-45.
    On February 3, 2010, a “Letter of Concern from Bioethicists,” organized by fetaldex.org, was sent to report suspected violations of the ethics of human subjects research in the off-label use of dexamethasone during pregnancy by Dr. Maria New. Copies of this letter were submitted to the FDA Office of Pediatric Therapeutics, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office for Human Research Protections, and three universities where Dr. New has held or holds appointments. We provide a critical appraisal of (...)
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  6. Benjamin Hippen, Robert L. Brent, Frank A. Chervenak & Laurence B. McCullough (2010). The Intellectual and Moral Integrity of Bioethics: Response to Commentaries on “A Case Study in Unethical Transgressive Bioethics: 'Letter of Concern From Bioethicists' About the Prenatal Administration of Dexamethasone”. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (9):W3-W5.
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  7. Benjamin Hippen & Arthur Matas (2009). The Point of Control: Can a Regulated Organ Market Be Moral? Hastings Center Report 39 (6):4-5.
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  8. Benjamin Hippen (2006). Innovation and the Persistent Challenge of Collapsing Goods. Journal of Value Inquiry 4 (2-3):227-233.
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  9. Benjamin E. Hippen (2005). Introduction. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (5):443 – 447.
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  10. Benjamin E. Hippen (2005). In Defense of a Regulated Market in Kidneys From Living Vendors. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (6):593 – 626.
    The current system of organ procurement which relies on donation is inadequate to the current and future need for transplantable kidneys. The growing disparity between demand and supply is accompanied by a steep human cost. I argue that a regulated market in organs from living vendors is the only plausible solution, and that objections common to opponents of organ markets are defeasible. I argue that a morally defensible market in kidneys from living vendors includes four characteristics: (1) the priority of (...)
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