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  1. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Benjamin Kerr, Selection in Ephemeral Networks.
    A model of “ephemeral” population structure is presented that applies not only to biological systems in which discrete groups form but also to networks without group boundaries. The evolution of altruistic behaviors is discussed. Nonrandom interaction and nonlinear fitness structures are modeled; together, these factors can produce stable polymorphisms of altruistic and selfish types, as well as bistability. Empirical applications of the model may be found in microbes, marine invertebrates, annual plants, and other organisms.
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  2. Benjamin Kerr, Peter Godfrey-Smith & Marcus W. Feldman, What is Altruism?
    Altruism is generally understood to be behavior that benefits others at a personal cost to the behaving individual. However, within evolutionary biology, different authors have interpreted the concept of altruism differently, leading to dissimilar predictions about the evolution of altruistic behavior. Generally, different interpretations diverge on which party receives the benefit from altruism and on how the cost of altruism is assessed. Using a simple trait-group framework, we delineate the assumptions underlying different interpretations and show how they relate to one (...)
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  3. Paul B. Rainey & Benjamin Kerr (2010). Cheats as First Propagules: A New Hypothesis for the Evolution of Individuality During the Transition From Single Cells to Multicellularity. Bioessays 32 (10):872-880.
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  4. Benjamin Kerr (2007). Niche Construction and Cognitive Evolution. Biological Theory 2 (3):250-262.
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  5. Benjamin Kerr (2004). The Caucus-Race of the Dodo. Biology and Philosophy 19 (5):781-799.
  6. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Benjamin Kerr (2002). Group Fitness and Multi-Level Selection: Replies to Commentaries. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (4):539-549.
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  7. Benjamin Kerr & Peter Godfrey-Smith (2002). Individualist and Multi-Level Perspectives on Selection in Structured Populations. Biology and Philosophy 17 (4):477-517.
    Recent years have seen a renewed debate over the importance of groupselection, especially as it relates to the evolution of altruism. Onefeature of this debate has been disagreement over which kinds ofprocesses should be described in terms of selection at multiple levels,within and between groups. Adapting some earlier discussions, we presenta mathematical framework that can be used to explore the exactrelationships between evolutionary models that do, and those that donot, explicitly recognize biological groups as fitness-bearing entities.We show a fundamental set (...)
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  8. Benjamin Kerr & Peter Godfrey-Smith (2002). On Price's Equation and Average Fitness. Biology and Philosophy 17 (4):551-565.
    A number of recent discussions have argued that George Price's equationfor representing evolutionary change is a powerful and illuminatingtool, especially in the context of debates about multiple levels ofselection. Our paper dissects Price's equation in detail, and comparesit to another statistical tool: the calculation and comparison ofaverage fitnesses. The relations between Price's equation and equationsfor evolutionary change using average fitness are closer than issometimes supposed. The two approaches achieve a similar kind ofstatistical summary of one generation of change, and they (...)
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