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Benjamin A. Rider [10]Benjamin Rider [3]
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Profile: Benjamin Rider (University of Central Arkansas)
  1.  5
    Benjamin A. Rider (2016). Ethics After Aristotle by Brad Inwood. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):157-158.
    The past half-century has seen a surge of interest in Aristotle’s ethics. For participants in this revived neo-Aristotelian tradition, Aristotle’s writings and distinctive ethical approach provide an important touchstone and inspiration for their own ideas. But this has happened before. In the classical world, from his own students and colleagues to the great commentator, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Aristotle’s followers adapted, debated, and reworked their master’s ideas, often in the context of debate with rival schools. Inwood’s short book outlines the trajectory (...)
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  2.  22
    Benjamin A. Rider (2014). Epicurus on the Fear of Death and the Relative Value of Lives. Apeiron 47 (4):461-484.
  3.  33
    Benjamin A. Rider (2011). Self-Care, Self-Knowledge, and Politics in the Alcibiades I. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):395-413.
    In the Alcibiades I, Socrates argues for the importance of self-knowledge. Recent interpreters contend that the self-knowledge at issue here is knowledge of an impersonal and purely rational self. I argue against this interpretation and advance an alternative. First, the passages proponents of this interpretation cite—Socrates’ argument that the self is the soul, and his suggestion that Alcibiades seek self-knowledge by looking for his soul’s reflection in the soul of another—do not unambiguously support their reading. Moreover, other passages, particularly Socrates’ (...)
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  4.  15
    Benjamin A. Rider (2011). A Socratic Seduction: Philosophical Protreptic in Plato's Lysis. Apeiron 44 (1):40-66.
    In Plato's Lysis, Socrates' conversation with Lysis features logical fallacies and questionable premises and closes with a blatantly eristic trick. I show how the form and content of these arguments make sense if we interpret them from the perspective of Socrates' pedagogical goals. Lysis is a competitive teenager who, along with his friend Menexenus, enjoys the game of eristic disputation. Socrates recognizes Lysis' predilections, and he constructs his arguments to engage Lysis' interests and loves, while also drawing the boy into (...)
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  5.  15
    Benjamin Rider (2012). Wisdom, Εὐτυχία, and Ηappiness in the Euthydemus. Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):1-14.
  6.  22
    Benjamin A. Rider (2010). The Ethics of Superlongevity. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (1):56-65.
    According to many scientists and futurists, technological advancements may soon make it possible significantly to extend average human life expectancy. This is often called "superlongevity." I discuss two arguments against superlongevity-first, a utilitarian argument from Peter Singer, and then an argument of my own. Although neither argument is decisive, I conclude that there are serious concerns about whether superlongevity would be a good idea that we need to reflect on as we consider the possibility.
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  7.  6
    Benjamin A. Rider (2014). Socratic Philosophy for Beginners? Teaching Philosophy 37 (3):365-377.
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  8.  6
    Benjamin Rider (2009). The Ethics of Confucius and Aristotle. Teaching Philosophy 32 (2):220-223.
  9.  11
    Benjamin A. Rider (2012). Socrates' Philosophical Protreptic in Euthydemus 278c–282d. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (2):208-228.
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  10.  6
    Benjamin A. Rider (2013). J.M. Rist Plato's Moral Realism. The Discovery of the Presuppositions of Ethics. Pp. X + 286. Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 2012. Paper, US$29.95 . ISBN: 978-0-8132-1980-6. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):362-364.
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  11.  6
    Benjamin A. Rider (2013). Plato's Charmides: Positive Elenchus in a 'Socratic' Dialogue, by Thomas Tuozzo. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):425-430.
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  12.  2
    Benjamin A. Rider (2014). Socratic Philosophy for Beginners?: On Introducing Philosophy with Plato's "Lysis". Teaching Philosophy 37 (3):365-377.
    In recent years, Plato’s Lysis has received much attention from professional scholars, but could it be used as a text in introductory classes? It is true that the Lysis poses challenges as an introductory text—its arguments are fast-paced and abstract. But I argue that the Lysis is actually an excellent pedagogical text, well suited to engage novices and introduce them to philosophy’s distinctive methods and way of thinking. It works particularly well as a text for engaging students in active learning, (...)
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  13. Benjamin Rider (2012). Wisdom,(Part of the Article Not Published in ASCI), and Happiness in the Euthydemus. Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):1.