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  1. Benjamin T. H. Smart, Inductive Scepticism in a Humean World.
    In this paper I show that David Armstrong is wrong to claim that the regularity theorist must be an inductive sceptic by demonstrating that even those who support worldly ontologies devoid of metaphysical glue (or as Hume might say, necessary connections ‘in the objects’) can justifiably make many inductive inferences. As well as branding the regularity theorist an inductive sceptic, Armstrong also claims that regularity theory (RT) laws have no explanatory value whatsoever. I try to show that Armstrong is also (...)
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  2. Benjamin T. H. Smart & Karim P. Y. Thebault, A Powerful Account of a Lazy World.
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  3. Benjamin T. H. Smart & Karim P. Y. Thebault, Dispositional Essentialism: A Powerful Account of a Lazy World.
    In this paper we discuss the compatibility of Alexander Bird's dispositional essentialism with one of our most fundamental physical principles - the principle of least action. Joel Katzav argues that this principle presupposes the contingency of its holding (that is, it presupposes that the system could have followed paths other than that which minimises action), and that this is ruled out by dispositional essentialism. However, Bird argues that only the logical possibility of paths different to the actual path followed is (...)
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  4. Karim P. Y. Thébault & Benjamin T. H. Smart, On the Metaphysics of Least Action.
    When it comes to predicting the evolution of physical systems, there seem to be two mathematically equivalent, but conceptually distinct kinds of what we might call 'fundamental laws': there are those laws we are most used to talking about -- Newtonian-style laws whereby we can take the state of a system at a time, t, apply the relevant laws of nature, and predict the state of the system at time t+1. These kinds of laws we refer to as 'equations of (...)
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