Search results for 'Bennett Ramsey' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Arthur W. Collins & Daniel C. Bennett (1966). Jonathan Bennett on Rationality: Two Reviews. Journal of Philosophy 63 (May):253-266.score: 180.0
     
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  2. Frank Plumpton Ramsey & D. H. Mellor (eds.) (1980). Prospects for Pragmatism: Essays in Memory of F. P. Ramsey. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    Haack, S. Is truth flat or bumpy?--Chihara, C. S. Ramsey's theory of types.--Loar, B. Ramsey's theory of belief and truth.--Skorupski, J. Ramsey on Belief.--Hookway, C. Inference, partial belief, and psychological laws.--Skyrms, B. Higher order degrees of belief.--Mellor, D. H. Consciousness and degrees of belief.--Blackburn, S. Opinions and chances.--Grandy, R. E. Ramsey, reliability, and knowledge.--Cohen, L. J. The problem of natural laws.--Giedymin, J. Hamilton's method in geometrical optics and Ramsey's view of theories.
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  3. Bennett Ramsey (1993). Submitting to Freedom: The Religious Vision of William James. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    Ramsey presents a new analysis and interpretation of the religious views of the nineteenth-century American philosopher William James. He argues that James was primarily motivated by religious concerns in his writings and that this fact has been obscured by the artificial scholarly division of his "philosophy," "psychology," and "religion"-- a symptom of the professionalization which James himself strenuously resisted in his own time.
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  4. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.score: 120.0
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about their (...)
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  5. Jonathan Bennett (2001). Conditionals and Explanations Jonathan Bennett. In Alex Byrne, Robert Stalnaker & Ralph Wedgwood (eds.), Fact and Value. Mit Press. 1.score: 120.0
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  6. Arnold Bennett (1996). Comment About Father McNabb From the Journal of Arnold Bennett, February 7, 1928. The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):221-221.score: 120.0
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  7. Bennett Ramsey (1994). System of Pragmatic Idealism. Review of Metaphysics 47 (3):634-636.score: 120.0
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  8. John G. Bennett (2008/1991). Idiots in Paris: Diaries of J.G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, 1949. Bennett Books.score: 120.0
     
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  9. John G. Bennett (1977/1988). John G. Bennett's Talks on Beelzebub's Tales. S. Weiser.score: 120.0
     
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  10. F. P. Ramsey (1990). F.P. Ramsey: Philosophical Papers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
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  11. Paul Ramsey (1987). Ramsey and McCormick, Revisited. Hastings Center Report 17 (1):39-39.score: 120.0
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  12. Jonathan Bennett, Accountability.score: 60.0
    I shall present a problem about accountability, and its solution by Strawson’s ‘Freedom and Resentment’. Some readers of this don’t see it as a profound contribution to moral philosophy, and I want to help them. It may be helpful to follow up Strawson’s gracefully written discussion with a more staccato presentation. My treatment will also be angled somewhat differently from his, so that its lights and shadows will fall with a certain difference, which may make it serviceable even to the (...)
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  13. Jonathan Francis Bennett (2001). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, 2 Volumes. Oxford University Press (Hardcover).score: 60.0
    In this illuminating, highly engaging book, Jonathan Bennett acquaints us with the ideas of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. For newcomers to the early modern scene, this lucidly written work is an excellent introduction. For those already familiar with the time period, this book offers insight into the great philosophers, treating them as colleagues, antagonists, students, and teachers.
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  14. M. Bennett, D. C. Dennett, P. M. S. Hacker & J. R. & Searle (eds.) (2007). Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language. Columbia University Press.score: 60.0
    "Neuroscience and Philosophy" begins with an excerpt from "Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience," in which Maxwell Bennett and Peter Hacker question the ...
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  15. Jonathan Bennett (2003). A Philosophical Guide to Conditionals. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Conditional sentences are among the most intriguing and puzzling features of language, and analysis of their meaning and function has important implications for, and uses in, many areas of philosophy. Jonathan Bennett, one of the world's leading experts, distils many years' work and teaching into this Philosophical Guide to Conditionals, the fullest and most authoritative treatment of the subject. An ideal introduction for undergraduates with a philosophical grounding, it also offers a rich source of illumination and stimulation for graduate (...)
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  16. Christopher Bennett (2008). The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. He argues that offenders have a 'right to be punished' - that it is part of taking an offender seriously as a member of a normatively demanding relationship (such as friendship or collegiality or citizenship) that she is subject to retributive attitudes when she violates the demands of that relationship. However, while he claims that (...)
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  17. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1974). Kant's Dialectic. New York]Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett here examines the second half of the Critique of Pure Reason, the Dialectic, where Kant is concerned with problems about substance, the nature ...
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  18. William Ramsey (1994). Distributed Representation and Causal Modularity: A Rejoinder to Forster and Saidel. Philosophical Psychology 7 (4):453-61.score: 60.0
    In “Connectionism and the fats of folk psychology”, Forster and Saidel argue that the central claim of Ramsey, Stich and Garon (1991)—that distributed connectionist models are incompatible with the causal discreteness of folk psychology—is mistaken. To establish their claim, they offer an intriguing model which allegedly shows how distributed representations can function in a causally discrete manner. They also challenge our position regarding projectibility of folk psychology. In this essay, I offer a response to their account and show how (...)
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  19. Paul Ramsey (1976). Some Rejoinders. Journal of Religious Ethics 4 (2):185 - 237.score: 60.0
    The author responds to the interpretations and criticisms of his thought as presented in the eleven essays in "Love and Society: Essays in the Ethics of Paul Ramsey" (Missoula, Montana: Scholars Press, 1974). He defends and refines his position on ethical theory, war and political ethics and medical ethics.
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  20. Joseph Ramsey, Bootstrapping the PC and CPC Algorithms to Improve Search Accuracy.score: 60.0
    By bootstrapping the output of the PC algorithm (Spirtes et al., 2000; Meek 1995), using larger conditioning sets informed by the current graph state, it is possible to define a novel algorithm, JPC, that improves accuracy of search for i.i.d. data drawn from linear, Gaussian, sparse to moderately dense models. The motivation for constructing sepsets using information in the current graph state is to highlight the differences between d-­‐separation information in the graph and conditional independence information extracted from the sample. (...)
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  21. Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) (2012). Bioethics, Medicine, and the Criminal Law: The Criminal Law and Bioethical Conflict: Walking the Tightrope. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction - when criminal law encounters bioethics: a case of tensions and incompatibilities or an apt forum for resolving ethical conflict? Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett and Suzanne Ost; Part I. Death, Dying, and the Criminal Law: 2. Euthanasia and assisted suicide should, when properly performed by a doctor in an appropriate case, be decriminalised John Griffiths; 3. Five flawed arguments for decriminalising euthanasia John Keown; 4. Euthanasia excused: between prohibition and permission Richard Huxtable; Part (...)
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  22. M. Bayram, J. P. Bennett & M. C. Dewar (1993). Using Computer Algebra to Determine Rate Constants in Biochemistry. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (1-2).score: 60.0
    In earlier work we have described how computer algebra may be used to derive composite rate laws for complete systems of equations, using the mathematical technique of Gröbner Bases (Bennett, Davenport and Sauro, 1988). Such composite rate laws may then be fitted to experimental data to yield estimates of kinetic parameters.Recently we have been investigating the practical application of this methodology to the estimation of kinetic parameters for the closed two enzyme system of aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and malate dehydrogenase (...)
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  23. Richard Scheines & Joe Ramsey, Simulating Genetic Regulartory Networks.score: 60.0
    Richard Scheines and Joe Ramsey. Simulating Genetic Regulartory Networks.
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  24. Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) (2013). Bioethics, Medicine, and the Criminal Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction - when criminal law encounters bioethics: a case of tensions and incompatibilities or an apt forum for resolving ethical conflict? Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett and Suzanne Ost; Part I. Death, Dying, and the Criminal Law: 2. Euthanasia and assisted suicide should, when properly performed by a doctor in an appropriate case, be decriminalised John Griffiths; 3. Five flawed arguments for decriminalising euthanasia John Keown; 4. Euthanasia excused: between prohibition and permission Richard Huxtable; Part (...)
     
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  25. George Bennett (2008). Foreword to New Edition. In John G. Bennett (ed.), Idiots in Paris: Diaries of J.G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, 1949. Bennett Books.score: 60.0
     
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  26. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 1. Clarendon Press (Paperback).score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, (...)
     
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  27. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 2. Clarendon Press (Paperback).score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, (...)
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  28. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers, Volume 1: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is an (...)
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  29. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers, Volume 2: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is (...)
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  30. Jonathan Bennett (2001). Learning From Six Philosophers: Volume 2. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descaretes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is an (...)
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  31. Elizabeth Bennett (2008). Original Foreword. In John G. Bennett (ed.), Idiots in Paris: Diaries of J.G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, 1949. Bennett Books.score: 60.0
     
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  32. John C. Bennett (ed.) (1967). Storm Over Ethics. Philadelphia]United Church Press.score: 60.0
    Principles and the context, by J. C. Bennett.--Love monism, by J. M. Gustafson.--Responsibility in freedom, by E. C. Gardner.--The new morality, by G. Fackre.--When love becomes excarnate, by H. L. Smith.--Situational morality, by R. W. Gleason.--The nature of heresy, by G. Kennedy.--Situation ethics under fire, by J. Fletcher.
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  33. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1995). The Act Itself. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this major new book, the internationally renowned thinker Jonathan Bennett offers a deeper understanding of what is going on in our own moral thoughts about human behavior. The Act Itself presents a conceptual analysis of descriptions of behavior on which we base our moral judgements, and shows that this analysis can be used as a means toward getting more control of our thoughts and thus of our lives.
     
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  34. Peter M. S. Hacker & Maxwell R. Bennett, History of Cognitive Neuroscience.score: 60.0
    History of Cognitive Neuroscience documents the major neuroscientific experiments and theories over the last century and a half in the domain of cognitive neuroscience, and evaluates the cogency of the conclusions that have been drawn from them. Provides a companion work to the highly acclaimed Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience – combining scientific detail with philosophical insights Views the evolution of brain science through the lens of its principal figures and experiments Addresses philosophical criticism of Bennett and Hacker′s previous book (...)
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  35. Paul Ramsey (1978). Ethics at the Edges of Life: Medical and Legal Intersections. Yale University Press.score: 60.0
    In this book, Ramsey addresses the moral problems of medicine, life and death and not merely to those who share his faith.
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  36. Frank Plumpton Ramsey (1925/1990). Philosophical Papers. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Frank Ramsey was the greatest of the remarkable generation of Cambridge philosophers and logicians which included G. E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Maynard Keynes. Before his tragically early death in 1930 at the age of twenty-six, he had done seminal work in mathematics and economics as well as in logic and philosophy. This volume, with a new and extensive introduction by D. H. Mellor, contains all Ramsey's previously published writings on philosophy and the foundations of mathematics. (...)
     
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  37. Karen Bennett (2003). Why the Exclusion Problem Seems Intractable and How, Just Maybe, to Tract It. Noûs 37 (3):471-97.score: 30.0
    The basic form of the exclusion problem is by now very, very familiar. 2 Start with the claim that the physical realm is causally complete: every physical thing that happens has a sufficient physical cause. Add in the claim that the mental and the physical are distinct. Toss in some claims about overdetermination, give it a stir, and voilá—suddenly it looks as though the mental never causes anything, at least nothing physical. As it is often put, the physical does all (...)
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  38. Karen Bennett, Why I Am Not a Dualist.score: 30.0
    Dualists think that not all the facts are physical facts. They think that there are facts about phenomenal consciousness that cannot be explained in purely physical terms—facts about what it’s like to see red, what it’s like to feel sandpaper, what it’s like to run 10 miles when it’s 15° F out, and so on. These phenomenal facts are genuine ‘extras’, not fixed by the physical facts and the physical laws. To use the standard metaphor: even after God settled the (...)
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  39. Karen Bennett (2008). Exclusion Again. In Jakob Hohwy & Jesper Kallestrup (eds.), Being Reduced: New Essays on Reduction, Explanation, and Causation. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    I think that there is an awful lot wrong with the exclusion problem. So, it seems, does just about everybody else. But of course everyone disagrees about exactly _what_ is wrong with it, and I think there is more to be said about that. So I propose to say a few more words about why the exclusion problem is not really a problem after all—at least, not for the nonreductive physicalist. The genuine _dualist_ is still in trouble. Indeed, one of (...)
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  40. William Ramsey, Stephen P. Stich & J. Garon (1991). Connectionism, Eliminativism, and the Future of Folk Psychology. In William Ramsey, Stephen P. Stich & D. Rumelhart (eds.), Philosophy and Connectionist Theory. Lawrence Erlbaum. 499-533.score: 30.0
  41. Karen Bennett, Zombies Everywhere!score: 30.0
    Case 1: Perhaps the phenomenal facts—facts about what it’s like to see red, or to taste freshly made pesto—do not supervene with metaphysical necessity on the physical facts and physical laws. This might be because the connections between the physical and the phenomenal are entirely unprincipled. Alternatively, it might be because whatever psychophysical laws do govern those connections are contingent. Either way, the claim is that there are metaphysically possible worlds that are just like the actual world in terms of (...)
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  42. Karen Bennett (2004). Spatio-Temporal Coincidence and the Grounding Problem. Philosophical Studies 118 (3):339-371.score: 30.0
    A lot of people believe that distinct objectscan occupy precisely the same place for theentire time during which they exist. Suchpeople have to provide an answer to the`grounding problem' – they have to explain howsuch things, alike in so many ways, nonethelessmanage to fall under different sortals, or havedifferent modal properties. I argue in detailthat they cannot say that there is anything invirtue of which spatio-temporally coincidentthings have those properties. However, I alsoargue that this may not be as bad as (...)
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  43. Karen Bennett (2006). Proxy “Actualism”. Philosophical Studies 129 (2):263 - 294.score: 30.0
    Bernard Linsky and Edward Zalta have recently proposed a new form of actualism. I characterize the general form of their view and the motivations behind it. I argue that it is not quite new – it bears interesting similarities to Alvin Plantinga’s view – and that it definitely isn’t actualist.
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  44. Karen Bennett (2007). Mental Causation. Philosophy Compass 2 (2):316–337.score: 30.0
    Concerns about ‘mental causation’ are concerns about how it is possible for mental states to cause anything to happen. How does what we believe, want, see, feel, hope, or dread manage to cause us to act? Certain positions on the mind-body problem—including some forms of physicalism—make such causation look highly problematic. This entry sketches several of the main reasons to worry, and raises some questions for further investigation.
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  45. Rebecca Bennett (2009). The Fallacy of the Principle of Procreative Beneficence. Bioethics 23 (5):265-273.score: 30.0
    The claim that we have a moral obligation, where a choice can be made, to bring to birth the 'best' child possible, has been highly controversial for a number of decades. More recently Savulescu has labelled this claim the Principle of Procreative Beneficence. It has been argued that this Principle is problematic in both its reasoning and its implications, most notably in that it places lower moral value on the disabled. Relentless criticism of this proposed moral obligation, however, has been (...)
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  46. Jonathan Bennett (2004). Time in Human Experience. Philosophy 79 (308):165-183.score: 30.0
    A set of eight mini-discourses. 1. The conceivability of the physical world's running in the opposite temporal direction. 2. Augustine's reason for thinking this is not conceivable for the world of the mind. 3. Trying to imagine being a creature that lives atemporally. 4. Memory's need for causal input. 5. Acting in the knowledge that how one acts is strictly determined. 6. The Newcomb problem. 7. The idea that all voluntary action is intended to be remedial. 8. Haunted by the (...)
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  47. Jonathan Bennett (1989). Two Departures From Consequentialism. Ethics 100 (1):54-66.score: 30.0
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  48. F. P. Ramsey (1925). Universals. Mind 34 (136):401-417.score: 30.0
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  49. Jonathan Bennett (1981). Spinoza's Mind-Body Identity Thesis. Journal of Philosophy 78 (10):573-584.score: 30.0
  50. Jane Bennett (2004). The Force of Things: Steps Toward an Ecology of Matter. Political Theory 32 (3):347-372.score: 30.0
    This essay seeks to give philosophical expression to the vitality, willfullness, and recalcitrance possessed by nonhuman entities and forces. It also considers the ethico-political import of an enhanced awareness of "thing-power." Drawing from Lucretius, Spinoza, Gilles Deleuze, Bruno Latour, and others, it describes a materialism of lively matter, to be placed in conversation with the historical materialism of Marx and the body materialism of feminist and cultural studies. Thing-power materialism is a speculative onto-story, an admittedly presumptuous attempt to depict the (...)
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