345 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Jonathan Bennett [161]John G. Bennett [24]Jane Bennett [24]J. Bennett [22]
Jim Bennett [19]J. A. Bennett [17]John B. Bennett [15]James O. Bennett [11]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also:
Profile: Joshua Bennett (University of Alberta)
Profile: John Bennett (Eastern Michigan University)
Profile: Jacob Bennett (University of St. Thomas, Minnesota)
Profile: Juian Bennett (Cardiff University)
Profile: Julian Bennett (Cardiff University)
Profile: Josh Bennett
Profile: Joe Bennett
Profile: Jason Bennett (University of California at Santa Barbara)
Profile: Julia Bennett (University of Manchester)
Profile: John G. Bennett
  1. Jonathan Bennett (2003). A Philosophical Guide to Conditionals. Oxford University Press.
    Conditional sentences are among the most intriguing and puzzling features of language, and analysis of their meaning and function has important implications for, and uses in, many areas of philosophy. Jonathan Bennett, one of the world's leading experts, distils many years' work and teaching into this Philosophical Guide to Conditionals, the fullest and most authoritative treatment of the subject. An ideal introduction for undergraduates with a philosophical grounding, it also offers a rich source of illumination and stimulation for graduate students (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   111 citations  
  2.  33
    Jonathan Francis Bennett (1976). Linguistic Behaviour. Cambridge University Press.
    First published in 1976, this book presents a view of language as a matter of systematic communicative behaviour.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   250 citations  
  3.  23
    Jane Bennett (2010). Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things. Duke University Press.
    The force of things -- The agency of assemblages -- Edible matter -- A life of metal -- Neither vitalism nor mechanism -- Stem cells and the culture of life -- Political ecologies -- Vitality and self-interest.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   32 citations  
  4. Judith M. Bennett (1993). Medievalism and Feminism. Speculum 68 (2):309-331.
    “What is this journal Speculum?” the prospective graduate student asked me. “Is it some sort of radical feminist journal? I saw copies of it in Professor So-and-So's office, and I can't imagine that he would subscribe to a feminist publication. . . . So, what is Speculum?” To understand this question, I had to remember myself at twenty-two years of age, educated but not professionalized, more familiar with speculum as an instrument used in gynecological examinations than with Speculum, the premier (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  68
    Jonathan Bennett (1988). Events and Their Names. Hackett.
    Various as these are, they have enough in common for them all to count as events, and in recent years philosophers have turned their attention to this..
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   81 citations  
  6.  60
    Jonathan Francis Bennett (1971). Locke, Berkeley, Hume: Central Themes. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
  7. Jonathan Bennett (1984). A Study of Spinoza's 'Ethics'. Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   65 citations  
  8. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Philosophical Guide to Conditionals. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Conditional sentences are among the most intriguing and puzzling features of language, and analysis of their meaning and function has important implications for, and uses in, many areas of philosophy. Jonathan Bennett, one of the world's leading experts, distils many years' work and teaching into this book, making it the fullest and most authoritative treatment of the subject.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  9.  3
    Jonathan Francis Bennett (1995). The Act Itself. Oxford University Press.
    In this major new book, the internationally renowned thinker Jonathan Bennett offers a deeper understanding of what is going on in our own moral thoughts about human behavior. The Act Itself presents a conceptual analysis of descriptions of behavior on which we base our moral judgements, and shows that this analysis can be used as a means toward getting more control of our thoughts and thus of our lives.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  10. Jonathan Francis Bennett (2001). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, 2 Volumes. Oxford University Press (Hardcover).
    In this illuminating, highly engaging book, Jonathan Bennett acquaints us with the ideas of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. For newcomers to the early modern scene, this lucidly written work is an excellent introduction. For those already familiar with the time period, this book offers insight into the great philosophers, treating them as colleagues, antagonists, students, and teachers.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  11. Jonathan Bennett (1967). Rationality. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 18 (1):74-76.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   77 citations  
  12. Jonathan Bennett (2001). Learning From Six Philosophers: Volume 2. Clarendon Press.
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descaretes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is an excellent (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  13.  97
    Jonathan Bennett (1990). Why Is Belief Involuntary? Analysis 50 (2):87 - 107.
    This paper will present a negative result—an account of my failure to explain why belief is involuntary. When I announced my question a year or so ahead of time, I had a vague idea of how it might be answered, but I cannot make it work out. Necessity, this time, has not given birth to invention. Still, my tussle with the question may contribute either towards getting it answered or showing that it cannot be answered because belief can be voluntary (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  14. Jonathan Bennett (1974). The Conscience of Huckleberry Finn. Philosophy 49 (188):123-134.
    In this paper1 I shall present not just the conscience of Huckleberry Finn but two others as well. One of them is the conscience of Heinrich Himmler. He became a Nazi in 1923; he served drably and quietly, but well, and was rewarded with increasing responsibility and power. At the peak of his career he held many offices and commands, of which the most powerful was that of leader of the S.S. - the principal police force of the Nazi regime. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  15. Jonathan Bennett (1985). Critical Notice. [REVIEW] Mind 94 (376):601 - 626.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  38
    Jonathan Francis Bennett (1974). Kant's Dialectic. New York]Cambridge University Press.
    Jonathan Bennett here examines the second half of the Critique of Pure Reason, the Dialectic, where Kant is concerned with problems about substance, the nature ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   28 citations  
  17.  11
    Jonathan Bennett (1978). Some Remarks About Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):557.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  18.  30
    Jonathan Francis Bennett (1966). Kant's Analytic. London, Cambridge U.P..
  19.  2
    Jonathan Bennett (1983). Cognitive Ethology: Theory or Poetry? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):356.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  20. Jonathan Bennett, Accountability.
    I shall present a problem about accountability, and its solution by Strawson’s ‘Freedom and Resentment’. Some readers of this don’t see it as a profound contribution to moral philosophy, and I want to help them. It may be helpful to follow up Strawson’s gracefully written discussion with a more staccato presentation. My treatment will also be angled somewhat differently from his, so that its lights and shadows will fall with a certain difference, which may make it serviceable even to the (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  18
    Bonnie Washick, Elizabeth Wingrove, Kathy E. Ferguson & Jane Bennett (2015). Politics That Matter: Thinking About Power and Justice with the New Materialists. Contemporary Political Theory 14 (1):63-89.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  99
    Jonathan Bennett (1995). Index of MIND Vol. 104 Nos. 1-4, 1995. Mind 104 (416):4.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Jane Bennett (2010). Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things. Duke University Press Books.
    In _Vibrant Matter_ the political theorist Jane Bennett, renowned for her work on nature, ethics, and affect, shifts her focus from the human experience of things to things themselves. Bennett argues that political theory needs to do a better job of recognizing the active participation of nonhuman forces in events. Toward that end, she theorizes a “vital materiality” that runs through and across bodies, both human and nonhuman. Bennett explores how political analyses of public events might change were we to (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  24.  63
    Jonathan Bennett (1984). Counterfactuals and Temporal Direction. Philosophical Review 93 (1):57-91.
  25. Jill Bennett (2005). Empathic Vision: Affect, Trauma, and Contemporary Art. Stanford University Press.
    This book analyzes contemporary visual art produced in the context of conflict and trauma from a range of countries, including Colombia, Northern Ireland, South Africa, and Australia. It focuses on what makes visual language unique, arguing that the "affective" quality of art contributes to a new understanding of the experience of trauma and loss. By extending the concept of empathy, it also demonstrates how we might, through art, make connections with people in different parts of the world whose experiences differ (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  26. Jane Bennett (2004). The Force of Things: Steps Toward an Ecology of Matter. Political Theory 32 (3):347-372.
    This essay seeks to give philosophical expression to the vitality, willfullness, and recalcitrance possessed by nonhuman entities and forces. It also considers the ethico-political import of an enhanced awareness of "thing-power." Drawing from Lucretius, Spinoza, Gilles Deleuze, Bruno Latour, and others, it describes a materialism of lively matter, to be placed in conversation with the historical materialism of Marx and the body materialism of feminist and cultural studies. Thing-power materialism is a speculative onto-story, an admittedly presumptuous attempt to depict the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Jonathan Bennett (1966). Whatever the Consequences. Analysis 26 (3):83 - 102.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  28. Jonathan Bennett (2002). What Events Are. In Richard M. Gale (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Metaphysics. Blackwell Publishers 43.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  29.  4
    Jane Bennett (2015). Encounters with an Art-Thing. Evental Aesthetics 4 (1):71-87.
    FEATURED IN EVENTAL AESTHETICS RETROSPECTIVE 1. LOOKING BACK AT 10 ISSUES OF EVENTAL AESTHETICS. What kind of things are damaged art-objects? Are they junk, trash, mere stuff? Or do they remain art by virtue of their distinguished provenance or still discernible design? What kind of powers do such things have as material bodies and forces? Instead of attempting to locate proper concepts for salvaged art-things, this essay, from a perspective centered on the power of bodies-in-encounter – where “power” in Spinoza’s (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  50
    Jonathan Bennett (1994). Descartes's Theory of Modality. Philosophical Review 103 (4):639-667.
    Descartes propounded the allegedly "strange", "peculiar", "curious" and "incoherent" doctrine that necessary truths are made true by God's voluntary act. It is generally held that this doctrine must be kept out of sight while other Cartesian topics are being discussed. This paper offers an interpretation of this Cartesian doctrine under which it comes out as reasonable, consistent with the rest of his philosophy, and possible even true. According to this interpretation--which is more respectful of and close to Descartes's text than (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  31.  38
    Jonathan Bennett (1975). Stimulus, Response, Meaning. American Philosophical Quarterly 9:55-88.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  32.  87
    Jonathan Bennett (1988). Farewell to the Phlogiston Theory of Conditionals. Mind 97 (388):509-527.
  33. Jonathan Bennett (1995). Classifying Conditionals: The Traditional Way is Right. Mind 104 (414):331-354.
  34.  48
    Jonathan Bennett (1974). Counterfactuals And Possible Worlds. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (December):381-402.
  35.  74
    Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay, John G. Bennett & Megan D. Higgs (2015). How to Undermine Underdetermination? Foundations of Science 20 (2):107-127.
    The underdetermination thesis poses a threat to rational choice of scientific theories. We discuss two arguments for the thesis. One draws its strength from deductivism together with the existence thesis, and the other is defended on the basis of the failure of a reliable inductive method. We adopt a partially subjective/objective pragmatic Bayesian epistemology of science framework, and reject both arguments for the thesis. Thus, in science we are able to reinstate rational choice called into question by the underdetermination thesis.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  26
    Jonathan Bennett (2005). Leibniz's Two Realms. In Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press 135--155.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  37.  62
    Jonathan Bennett (1957). Some Aspects of Probability and Induction (II). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 7 (28):316-322.
  38. Jonathan Bennett (1961). A Myth About Logical Necessity. Analysis 21 (3):59 - 63.
    In these few pages I shall try to demonstrate the emptiness of the most cumbersome piece of unexamined intellectual baggage at present being hauled about by English philosophers. I here cite one example to be going on with, at the end of the paper I shall give a handful more, and it would be easy to multiply the number by ten from the writings of reputable philosophers. The outstanding philosophical achievement of the ha1f-century which has just drawn to a close (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. James O. Bennett (1975). Natural and Nomological Necessity. New Scholasticism 49 (4):393-409.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. L. Stewart & J. A. Bennett (1994). The Rise of Public Science: Rhetoric, Technology and Natural Philosophy in Newtonian Britain, 1660-1750. Annals of Science 51 (5):555-555.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  41. Jonathan Bennett (1958). Analytic-Synthetic. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 59:163 - 188.
    The aim of this paper1 is to attack Quine’s views on the analytic-synthetic distinction (ASD), but more than half of it will be devoted to arguing that an attack is still required. This preliminary thesis is based on the claim that what Quine presents as (1) an attack on the ASD, followed by (2) some remarks about confirmation and disconfirmation, offers a more formidable obstacle to the adherent of the traditional ASD if (2) is built into (1) as a positive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. P. R. Strawson, Jonathan Bennett, D. P. Dryer & Arnulf Zweig (1967). The Bounds of Sense: An Essay on Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason.". Ethics 78 (1):89-90.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  43. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about their (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Jonathan Bennett & Samuel Gorovitz (1997). Improving Academic Writing. Teaching Philosophy 20 (2):105-120.
    Academic writing, even in prestigious journals, is frequently ugly and arduous. The writing in academic philosophy is no exception, especially given philosophers’ tendency to overlook prose and to focus exclusively on philosophical content. This paper argues that good prose matters for moral, prudential, and philosophical reasons. After glossing these reasons, the authors offer advice, born of experience, to academic writers who want to achieve clear, effective prose. Their advice includes how to improve sentence structure (e.g. eliminate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  90
    William P. Alston & Jonathan Bennett (1984). Identity and Cardinality: Geach and Frege. Philosophical Review 93 (4):553-567.
    P. T. Geach, notoriously, holds the Relative Identity Thesis, according to which a meaningful judgment of identity is always, implicitly or explicitly, relative to some general term. ‘The same’ is a fragmentary expression, and has no significance unless we say or mean ‘the same X’, where ‘X’ represents a general term (what Frege calls a Begriffswort or Begriffsausdruck). (P. T. Geach, Mental Acts (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1957), p. 69. I maintain that it makes no sense to judge whether (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  46.  11
    Jane Bennett (2010). A Vitalist Stopover on the Way to a New Materialism. In Diana H. Coole & Samantha Frost (eds.), New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics. Duke University Press 47--69.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47.  78
    Jonathan Bennett, Eight Questions About Spinoza.
    Perhaps the biggest radically unsolved problem about Part II of the Ethics is something that occurs in Part I, namely the definition of ‘attribute’ as ‘that which intellect perceives of substance as its essence’ (1d4). The term ‘intellect’ brings in just one of the attributes, namely thought, raising the question: A. What special privilege does thought have that entitles it to figure in the explanation of the..
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48. Jane Bennett (2012). Systems and Things: A Response to Graham Harman and Timothy Morton. New Literary History 43 (2):225-233.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 2. Clarendon Press (Paperback).
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, not as (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50. Jonathan Bennett (1989). Two Departures From Consequentialism. Ethics 100 (1):54-66.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 345