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  1. Benoît Godin (2014). “Innovation Studies”: Staking the Claim for a New Disciplinary “Tribe”. Minerva 52 (4):489-495.
    If anyone in Victoria’s reign had tried to put himself outside the mystique of that society and, from outside, coldly to dissect the word gentleman, we can guess what would have happened to him. Wherever he had found confusion he would have been told ‘But of course you can’t understand. That is because you yourself are not a gentleman’ (Clive Staples Lewis, Studies in Words, 1960).In recent years the phrase “innovation studies” has come to be used by a group of (...)
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  2. Benoît Godin (2013). What Business Are You In, Mr Barber? Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (10):989-991.
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  3. Benoît Godin (2012). “Innovation Studies”: The Invention of a Specialty. [REVIEW] Minerva 50 (4):397-421.
    Innovation has become a very popular concept over the twentieth century. However, few have stopped to study the origins of the category and to critically examine the studies produced on innovation. This paper conducts such an analysis on one type of innovation, namely technological innovation. The study of technological innovation is over one hundred years old. From the early 1900s onward, anthropologists, sociologists, historians, and economists began theorizing about technological innovation, each from his own respective disciplinary framework. However, in the (...)
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  4. Benoît Godin (2010). Innovation Without the Word: William F. Ogburn's Contribution to the Study of Technological Innovation. [REVIEW] Minerva 48 (3):277-307.
    The history of innovation as a category is dominated by economists and by the contribution of J. A. Schumpeter. This paper documents the contribution of a neglected but influential author, the American sociologist William F. Ogburn. Over a period of more than 30 years, Ogburn developed pioneering ideas on three dimensions of technological innovation: origins, diffusion, and effects. He also developed the first conceptual framework for innovation studies—based on the concept of cultural lags—which led to studying and forecasting the impacts (...)
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  5. Benoît Godin (2008). In the Shadow of Schumpeter: W. Rupert Maclaurin and the Study of Technological Innovation. [REVIEW] Minerva 46 (3):343-360.
    J. Schumpeter is a key figure, even a seminal one, on technological innovation. Most economists who study technological innovation refer to Schumpeter and his pioneering role in introducing innovation into economic studies. However, despite having brought forth the concept of innovation in economic theory, Schumpeter provided few if any analyses of the process of innovation itself. This paper suggests that the origin of systematic studies on technological innovation owes its existence to the economist W. Rupert Maclaurin from MIT. In the (...)
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  6. Benoit Godin (2002). The Numbers Makers: Fifty Years of Science and Technology Official Statistics. [REVIEW] Minerva 40 (4):375-397.
    Official science and technology statistics arefifty years old. Among industrial countries,the forerunners were the United States, Canadaand Great Britain. This paper traces thedevelopment and the construction of S&Tstatistics in these three countries, and theirsubsequent standardization, mainly by theOECD, in the 1960s. It shows how military andscience policy needs drove the construction ofstatistics, until economic considerations cameto dominate their development. It alsodiscusses how statistics interacted withpolitics by way of studies that documentedgaps between OECD Member countries and betweenthe OECD and the USSR.
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  7. Benoit Godin (2002). The Number Makers: Fifty Years of Official Statistics on Science and Technology. Minerva 40 (4):375-397.
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  8. Benoît Godin (1999). Argument From Consequences and the Urge to Polarize. Argumentation 13 (4):347-365.
    Polarization is a generalized feature of intellectual life. Few authors however have studied polarities as they actually occur in every day life and discourse. This paper proposes two hypotheses to account for the pervasiveness of polarities. The first relates to uncertainty. Almost everything that touches our lives is filled with irreducible uncertainty. As a rhetoric, polarization uses arguments from (future) consequences in order to manage the future. The second hypothesis relates to phenomenology: body and behavior incorporate tensions or dualistic properties (...)
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