Search results for 'Bernard Botiveau' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bernard Botiveau (1997). Tolerance and Law: From Islamic Culture to Islamist Ideology. Ratio Juris 10 (1):61-74.score: 240.0
  2. Lauren Freeman (2010). Metontology , Moral Particularism, and the “Art of Existing:” A Dialogue Between Heidegger, Aristotle, and Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):545-568.score: 24.0
    An important shift occurs in Martin Heidegger’s thinking one year after the publication of Being and Time , in the Appendix to the Metaphysical Foundations of Logic . The shift is from his project of fundamental ontology—which provides an existential analysis of human existence on an ontological level—to metontology . Metontology is a neologism that refers to the ontic sphere of human experience and to the regional ontologies that were excluded from Being and Time. It is within metontology, Heidegger states, (...)
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  3. Margaret A. Simons & Helene N. Peters (2004). Introduction to Beauvoir's "Analysis of Claude Bernard's Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine&Quot;. In Margaret A. Simons, Marybeth Timmermann & Mary Beth Mader (eds.), Philosophical Writings. University of Illinois Press. 15-22.score: 24.0
    In December 1924 when Simone de Beauvoir almost certainly wrote her essay analyzing Claude Bernard's "Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine," a classic text in the philosophy of science, she was a 16 yr old student in a senior-level philosophy class at a private Catholic girls' school. Given the popular conception of existentialism as anti science, Beauvoir's early interest in science, reflected in her baccalaureate successes as well as her paper on Bernard, may be surprising. But her (...)
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  4. Alex Voorhoeve (2004). A Mistrustful Animal: Bernard Williams Interviewed. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):81-92.score: 24.0
    A discussion with Bernard Williams about main themes in his work. (Note: a version of this interview appears in 'Conversations on Ethics' (OUP, 2009).).
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  5. Ulrich Charpa (2006). Mister Bixby, Monsieur Bernard, and Some Other 19th Century Scientist–Philosophers on Knowledge-Based Actions. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (2):257 - 268.score: 24.0
    Following Mr. Bixby and some other 19th century scientist-philosophers such as Claude Bernard, relevant scientific actions should, as a matter of primary importance, be explained with reference to the competence and not to the intentions of those involved. The background is a reliabilist virtue approach - a widespread tendency in 19th century epistemology and philosophy of science. Bixby's approach includes a critique of some constructivist arguments and establishes a mutually supportive connection to conceptions of scientific progress.
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  6. Gustavo Caponi, Claude Bernard, Charles Darwin y los dos modos fundamentales de interrogar lo viviente.score: 24.0
    Research in modern biology has largely been developed according to two main ways of inquiry, as they were outlined by Charles Darwin and Claude Bernard. Each stands for a specific approach to the living corresponding to two different methodological rules: the principle of natural selection and the principle of causation.
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  7. Andrey Ivanov (2012). St. Bernard: Apology and Architectural Art. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):179-186.score: 24.0
    Este artigo busca expor as críticas de Bernardo de Claraval às superfluidades humanas no texto da Apologia, especialmente aquelas referentes à arte arquitetural. Em segundo lugar, procura analisar as implicações estéticas do ascetismo cisterciense e bernardiano. As críticas de Bernardo exercem uma influência decisiva na ornamentação e fazem nascer uma nova arquitetura. This paper is to expose the criticism of human superfluities at Bernard of Clairvaux in the text of the Apology, especially those related to architectural art. Secondly, analyzes (...)
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  8. Christian Maurer (2014). What Can an Egoist Say Against an Egoist? On Archibald Campbell's Criticisms of Bernard Mandeville. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):1-18.score: 24.0
    Like Bernard Mandeville, Archibald Campbell develops a profoundly egoistic conception of human psychology. However, Campbell attacks numerous points in Mandeville’s moral philosophy, in particular Mandeville’s treatment of self-love, the desire for esteem, and human nature in general as corrupt. He also criticises Mandeville’s corresponding insistence on self-denial and his rigorist conception of luxury. Campbell himself is subsequently attacked by Scottish orthodox Calvinists - not for his egoism, but for his optimism regarding postlapsarian human nature and self-love. This episode demonstrates (...)
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  9. Robert Arnautu (2010). Bernard Miege, Societatea cucerita de comunicare/ Society Conquered by Communication. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):144-147.score: 24.0
    Bernard Miege, Societatea cucerita de comunicare Ed. Polirom, Iasi, 2004.
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  10. Ricardo Da Costa (2009). Transcendence above immanence: the Soul in mysticism of Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153). Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 26:97-105.score: 24.0
    This work will examine the concept of soul developed in mysticism of abbot Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153). For this, I will analyze extracts of five writings namely the Third Series of Sentences, three of his Liturgical Sermons, and the parabola The Three Children of the King.
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  11. Eileen De Neeve (2010). Interpreting Bernard Lonergan's General Theory of Economic Dynamics: Does It Complete Hayek, Keynes and Schumpeter? Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 5.score: 24.0
    The paper reviews links between Bernard Lonergan's theory of innovative economic growth and cycles, and the ideas of Friedrich Hayek, John Maynard Keynes, and Joseph Schumpeter. They were contemporary economists, who remain influential today. For Lonergan, although markets define what is bought and sold in an exchange economy, production decisions are more fundamental. These decisions are choices about the direction of development, the standard of living, and variations in the distribution of wealth in a modern society. The paper shows (...)
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  12. Anders Kruse Ljungdalh (2013). Experimenting with Styles of Living: Bernard, Canguilhem and Type 2 Diabetes Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (3):369-383.score: 24.0
    The paper links a debate in the history of medical science between statistics and the experimental method with contemporary diabetes educational practices. An empirical example of a tension between neglect and concern in diabetes self-regulation frames the subsequent theoretical discussion between first, Claude Bernard and statistics and afterwards, Georges Canguilhem as a correlative to Bernard. Through these philosophers of medical science a connection between the experimental method and education is demonstrated. Finally, a case description of an experimental approach (...)
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  13. Tad Dunne, Bernard Lonergan. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  14. John Tillson (2013). Is Knowledge What It Claims to Be? Bernard Williams and the Absolute Conception. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (8):860-873.score: 21.0
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  15. D. N. Byrne (2013). After Tocqueville – the Curious Adventures of Bernard-Henri Lévy and Don Watson. [REVIEW] Australian Review of Public Affairs - Drawing Board.score: 21.0
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  16. Jean Leclercq (2011). Voir le monde par les affects : Bernard de Clairvaux et la voie monastique. Revue des Sciences Philosophiques Et Théologiques 2:323-341.score: 21.0
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  17. Lorenzo Greco (2012). Reflection and the Individual in Bernard Williams. Iride 25 (1):103-118.score: 21.0
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  18. Jonathan Duquette (2011). “Quantum Physics and Vedanta”: A Perspective From Bernard D'Espagnat's Scientific Realism. Zygon 46 (3):620-638.score: 18.0
    Abstract. In the last decades, several rapprochements have been made between quantum physics and the Advaita Vedānta (AV) school of Hinduism. Theoretical issues such as the role of the observer in measurement and physical interconnectedness have been associated with tenets of AV, generating various critical responses. In this study, I propose to address this encounter in the light of recent works on philosophical implications of quantum physics by the physicist and philosopher of science Bernard d’Espagnat.
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  19. J. E. J. Altham & Ross Harrison (eds.) (1995). World, Mind, and Ethics: Essays on the Ethical Philosophy of Bernard Williams. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Bernard Williams is one of the most influential figures in recent ethical theory, where he has set a considerable part of the current agenda. In this collection, a distinguished international team of philosophers who have been stimulated by Williams' work give new responses to it. The topics covered include equality, consistency, comparisons between science and ethics, integrity, moral reasons, the moral system, and moral knowledge. Williams himself then provides a substantial reply, which in turn shows both the current directions (...)
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  20. Alex Bavister‐Gould (2013). Bernard Williams: Political Realism and the Limits of Legitimacy. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):593-610.score: 18.0
    : A central component of Bernard Williams' political realism is the articulation of a standard of legitimacy from within politics itself: LEG. This standard is presented as basic, inherent in all political orders and the best way to underwrite fundamental liberal principles particular to the modern state, including basic human rights. It does not require, according to Williams, a wider set of liberal values. In the following, I show that where Williams restricts LEG to generating only minimal political protections, (...)
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  21. Bernard Yack (2006). Bernard Williams, In the Beginning Was the Deed: Realism and Moralism in Political Argument:In the Beginning Was the Deed: Realism and Moralism in Political Argument. Ethics 116 (3):615-618.score: 18.0
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  22. K. Forrester (2012). Judith Shklar, Bernard Williams and Political Realism. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (3):247-272.score: 18.0
    In light of recent interest among political theorists in the idea of political realism, Judith Shklar’s liberalism of fear has come to be associated with anti-Rawlsian thought. This paper seeks to show that, on the contrary, Shklar’s specific formulation of political realism, unlike more recent variations, was not motivated by a critique of Rawls. This paper will address three concerns: first, it will show what exactly Shklar’s initial realism was responding to; second, it will consider the implications of this realism (...)
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  23. Hugh LaFollette & Niall Shanks (1994). Animal Experimentation: The Legacy of Claude Bernard. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 8 (3):195 – 210.score: 18.0
    Claude Bernard, the father of scientific physiology, believed that if medicine was to become truly scientiifc, it would have to be based on rigorous and controlled animal experiments. Bernard instituted a paradigm which has shaped physiological practice for most of the twentieth century. ln this paper we examine how Bernards commitment to hypothetico-deductivism and determinism led to (a) his rejection of the theory of evolution; (b) his minima/ization of the role of clinical medicine and epidemiological studies; and (c) (...)
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  24. William F. J. Ryan (1973). Intentionality in Edmund Husserl and Bernard Lonergan. International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (2):173-190.score: 18.0
    ALTHOUGH THERE is no direct dependence of Bernard Lonergan upon Edmund HusserI in the manner, say, of Husserl himself upon Franz Brentano, there are nonetheless points of similarity and contrast between them. It would be possible to list these matching points singly on their own, such as Epoche and self-appropriation, Erlebnis and consciousness, monad and subject, Anschauung and affirmation. However, besides and beneath these individual points of similarity and contrast, lying as their basis, there is similarity and contrast at (...)
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  25. G. Dammann (2010). Opera and the Limits of Philosophy: On Bernard Williams's Music Criticism. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (4):469-479.score: 18.0
    This paper provides a reading of the opera criticism of Bernard Williams in the light of his philosophical writings. Beginning with the observations that his philosophical writing lacks engagement with musical and aesthetic issues, and his operatic writing appears to present no particular philosophy of the subject, I try to draw together certain themes by mapping Williams's operatic concerns onto his philosophical project more generally. I argue that the 'excessive' nature of the artform—the idea that opera tends to exceed (...)
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  26. Ulrike Heuer & Gerald Lang (eds.) (2012). Luck, Value, and Commitment: Themes From the Ethics of Bernard Williams. Oxford University Press, USA.score: 18.0
    Luck, Value, and Commitment comprises eleven new essays which engage with, or take their point of departure from, the influential work in moral and political philosophy of Bernard Williams (1929-2003).
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  27. Lantz Miller (2012). Bernard E. Rollin: Putting the Horse Before Descartes: My Life's Work on Behalf of Animals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):243-248.score: 18.0
    Bernard E. Rollin: Putting the Horse Before Descartes: My Life’s Work on Behalf of Animals Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-6 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9316-4 Authors Lantz Miller, City University of New York, New York, NY, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  28. C. Kaczor (2012). Conscientious Objection and Health Care: A Reply to Bernard Dickens. Christian Bioethics 18 (1):59-71.score: 18.0
    Bernard Dickens seeks to undermine the legal and ethical protections accorded to health care workers and hospitals conscientiously objecting to abortion. First, he appeals to the rationale of antidiscrimination laws as a basis for arguing against conscientious objection. Second, he argues that conscientious objection undermines the rights of patients and their autonomy. Third, he holds that conscientiously objecting doctors have a duty to refer patients for abortion. Fourth, he believes that Kant’s principle of respect for humanity as an end (...)
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  29. Teodor Bernardus Baba (2009). The Use of Husserl's Method in Bernard Lonergan's Trinitarian Theology. Philosophy and Theology 21 (1/2):43-104.score: 18.0
    The question that arises in this article is whether we can find elements of phenomenology in Bernard Lonergan’s Trinitarian theology.With help of other Lonergan scholars, I have discovered that modern thinking plays an important role in the theology and philosophy ofthis Jesuit author. Moreover, the terminology of modern philosophy coexists with the terminology of classical and especially Tomisticthought. This article is interested in the elements that Lonergan takes from the modern philosophy and emphasizes the centrality ofHusserlian phenomenology among the (...)
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  30. Bernard Stiegler (2010). De L'Industrialisation Du Mal-Être À La Renaissance Du Politique. Un Entretien Avec Bernard Stiegler. Symposium 14 (2):78-108.score: 18.0
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  31. Patrick R. Daly (2009). A Theory of Health Science and the Healing Arts Based on the Philosophy of Bernard Lonergan. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):147-160.score: 18.0
    This paper represents a preliminary investigation relating Bernard Lonergan’s thought to health science and the healing arts. First, I provide background for basic elements of Lonergan’s theoretical terminology that I employ. As inquiry is the engine of Lonergan’s method, next I specify two questions that underlie medical insights and define several terms, including health, disease, and illness, in relation to these questions. Then I expand the frame of reference to include all disciplines involved in the cycle of clinical interaction (...)
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  32. Edward M. Hogan (2009). John Polkinghorne and Bernard Lonergan on the Scientific Status of Theology. Zygon 44 (3):558-582.score: 18.0
    On the basis of his acquaintance with theoretical elementary particle physics, and following the lead of Thomas Torrance, John Polkinghorne maintains that the data upon which a science is based, and the method by which it treats those data, must respect the idiosyncratic nature of the object with which the science is concerned. Polkinghorne calls this the "accommodation" (or "conformity") of a discipline to its object. The question then arises: What should we expect religious experience and theological method to be (...)
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  33. Edgar A. Towne (2011). Empirical Naturalism: Bernard M. Loomer's Interpretation of Whitehead's Philosophy. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (3):255 - 266.score: 18.0
    Bernard MacDougall Loomer (1912–1985) is well known for his influence on process theology, or as he preferred, “process-relational” theology. Less well known is his interpretation of the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead (1861–1947) and its influence in the promotion of that philosophy not only among his students but also more recently beyond that circle. He presents his own views as one who has made Whitehead’s his own. Yet he is not uncritical of Whitehead. He has articulated an empirical naturalism (...)
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  34. Brian Keith Axel (2009). Forests of Citation: Concluding Unauthorized Postscript to Figured Fragments of Bernard S. Cohn's `History and Anthropology: The State of Play'. History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):1-27.score: 18.0
    This text represents an exploration of the possible significance of Bernard S. Cohn's 1980 essay, `History and Anthropology: The State of Play', for understanding the present of historical anthropology and its futures. My discussion has two aims: (1) to reflect on both Bernard S. Cohn's pedagogy and mode of inquiry; and (2) to explore the complexity and nuance of citationality as a generative principle within the constitution of historical anthropology's subject. Toward this, I examine Cohn's notion of `the (...)
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  35. Maarten Meester (2000). An Interview with Bernard-Henri Lévy: Grandeur and Misery of Commitment. Sartre Studies International 6 (2):62-66.score: 18.0
    "The only way not to to make mistakes is to wait until history has passed you by," states Bernard-Henri Lévy. But he doesn't like to wait. And that's why 'BHL', armed with a cell phone and raybans, takes off for political hot spots.""Je t'embrasse." The philosopher ends the phone call and places the tiny Ericsson cell phone on the table next to his Ray Bans. He turns to his interviewers: "Where were we?"For a moment they are lost, distracted by (...)
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  36. Colleen McCluskey (2008). Bernard of Clairvaux on the Nature of Human Agency. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 64 (1):297 - 317.score: 18.0
    There has been a great deal of interest in medieval action theory in recent years. Nonetheless, relatively little work has been done on figures prior to the so-called High Middle Ages, and much of what has been done has focused on better-known thinkers, such as Augustine and Anselm. By comparison, Bernard of Clairvaux's treatise, De gratia et libero arbitrio has been neglected. Yet his treatise is quoted widely by such important scholars as Philip the Chancellor, Alexander of Hales, and (...)
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  37. Lantz Miller (1998). Filling the Gaps in the Risks Vs. Benefits of Mammalian Adult-Cell Cloning: Taking Bernard Rollin's Philosophy its Next Step. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (1):1-16.score: 18.0
    A critique is made of Bernard Rollin''s examination of the ethics of cloning adult mammalian cells. The primary concern is less to propound an anticloning or procloning position than to call for full exploration of the ethical complexities before a rush to judgment is made. Indeed, the ethical examination in question rushes toward an ethical position in such a way that does not appear consistent with Rollin''s usual methodology. By extending this methodology – which entails full weighing of benefits (...)
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  38. Michael A. Shmidman & Bernard Lander (eds.) (2007). Turim: Studies in Jewish History and Literature: Presented to Dr. Bernard Lander. Distributed by Ktav Pub..score: 18.0
    The Circumcision Controversy in Classical Reform in Historical Context Judith Bleich Toward the close of the nineteenth century, a gathering of rabbinic ...
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  39. Jérôme Goffette & Jonathan Simon, The Internal Environment: Claude Bernard's Concept and its Representation in Fantastic Voyage (R. Fleisher).score: 18.0
    For centuries the common and scholarly visions of the interior of the human body were dominated by humoral and anatomical representations. At the end of the nineteenth century two innovations modified these representations: Röntgen's X-rays (1895) and Claude Bernard's theory of the internal environment (milieu intérieur, 1867). This latter model became a central paradigm for thinking about the living body at the beginning of the twentieth century. This paper shows how Bernard's theory provided a new scientific, microscopic, physiological, (...)
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  40. John McMurtry (2003). The Life-Blind Structure of the Neoclassical Paradigm: A Critique of Bernard Hodgson's "Economics as a Moral Science". [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (4):377 - 389.score: 18.0
    This paper achieves two general objectives. It first analyses Bernard Hodgson's "Economic As Moral Science" as a path-breaking internal critique of neo-classical economic theory, and it then demonstrates that the underlying neo-classical paradigm he presupposes suffers from a deeper-structural myopia than his standpoint recognizes. EMS mainly exposes the a priori moral prescriptions underlying orthodox consumer choice theory - namely, its classical utilitarian ground and four or, as argued here, five hidden universal categorical-ought prescriptions which the theory presupposes as (...)
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  41. Tristan Guillermo Torriani (2010). Perspectivism and Intersubjective Criteria for Personal Identity: A Defense of Bernard Williams' Criterion of Bodily Continuity. Princípios 15 (23):153-190.score: 18.0
    In this article I revisit earlier stages of the discussion of personal identity, before Neo-Lockean psychological continuity views became prevalent. In particular, I am interested in Bernard Williams’ initial proposal of bodily identity as a necessary, although not sufficient, criterion of personal identity. It was at this point that psychological continuity views came to the fore arguing that bodily identity was not necessary because brain transplants were logically possible, even if physically impossible. Further proposals by Shoemaker of causal relations (...)
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  42. Nikolaus Wandinger (2007). Drama and Conversion: Raymund Schwager's Dramatic Theology as an Exercise of Bernard Lonergan's Functional Specialty of Foundations. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 63 (4):1203 - 1222.score: 18.0
    Raymund Schwager SJ suggested a dramatic way of looking at the Christ event, as recorded in the New Testament, in order to clarify the meaning of it and provide a coherent picture. Bernard Lonergan SJ developed a theological methodology for our day. In this article, the author tries to determine how Schwager's approach relates to Lonergan's methodology. He wants to investigate the question: what functional specialty is Schwager engaged in in his main work? The answer shall be that this (...)
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  43. Dennis Badeen (2012). Bernard Hodgson's Trojan Horse Critique of Neoclassical Economics and the Second Phase of the Empiricist Level of Analysis. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):15-25.score: 18.0
    This article examines and assesses Bernard Hodgson’s critique of the Neoclassical concept of rationality and its place in the literature. It is argued that Hodgson’s Trojan horse critique is superior to the others because it addresses the role of empiricist epistemology in reducing reason to instrumental rationality and consequent disappearance of the human subject of political economy. The second phase of the empiricist level of analysis reintroduces the capacities for ethical deliberation, self-determination, and the socio-historical conditions and institutional setting (...)
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  44. Constant J. Mews (2004). Bernard of Clairvaux, Peter Abelard and Heloise on the Definition of Love. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 60 (3):633 - 660.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the thinking of Bernard of Clairvaux about love in relationship to the ideas of his two famous contemporaries, Peter Abelard and Héloise. It looks at Bernard's intellectual debt to William of Champeaux on issues of sin and grace, and to William of Saint-Thierry for ideas about how amor evolves into caritas. Bernard makes a stronger link between amor and dilectio, and introduces use of the Song of Songs, to explain how worldly love can develop (...)
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  45. Roger J. Sullivan (1999). How Bernard Williams Constructed His Critique of Kant's Moral Theory. Kantian Review 3:106-113.score: 18.0
    One of the more striking developments in contemporary philosophic discussions about morality has been the rise of anti-theory — the rejection of moral theories as ‘unnecessary, undesirable, and/or impossible’. Among those associated with this view have been Bernard Williams, John McDowell, Edmund Pincoffs and James Wallace.
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  46. Mark D. Sullivan (1990). Reconsidering the Wisdom of the Body: An Epistemological Critique of Claude Bernard's Concept of the Internal Environment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):493-514.score: 18.0
    Claude Bernard's concept of the internal environment ( milieu intérieur ) played a crucial role in the development of experimental physiology and the specific medical therapeutics derived from it. This concept allowed the experimentalist to approach the organism as fully determined yet relatively autonomous with respect to its external environment. However, Bernard's theory of knowledge required that he find organismic functioning as the result of an external necessity. He is therefore unable to explain adequately the origin or operation (...)
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  47. Phyllis Vandenberg & Abigail DeHart, Mandeville, Bernard. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    Bernard Mandeville (1670-1733) Bernard Mandeville is primarily remembered for his impact on discussions of morality and economic theory in the early eighteenth century. His most noteworthy and notorious work is The Fable of the Bees, which triggered immense public criticism at the time. He had a particular influence on philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment, most […].
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  48. Jeremy Anderson (2012). Hobbess Demanding Consequentialism: Comments on Bernard Gerts Hobbes: Prince of Peace. Hobbes Studies 25 (2):188-198.score: 18.0
    I take issue with Bernard Gert’s interpretation of Hobbes on two main points. First, I argue that Hobbes’s moral theory reduces to a sophisticated form of consequentialism. Second, I argue that Hobbes’s moral theory is more demanding than Gert’s interpretation, and some of Hobbes’s own remarks, make it appear. I focus on Gert’s reading of Hobbes’s second law of nature, and argue that the law presents us with a Hobson’s choice—that is, the appearance of a choice of how much (...)
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  49. John Douglas Bishop (2012). The Elephant in the Room: On the Absence of Corporations in Bernard Hodgson's Economics as a Moral Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):27-35.score: 18.0
    In his book Economics as a Moral Science , Bernard Hodgson argues that economics is not value neutral as is often claimed, but is a value-laden discipline. In the long argument for this in his book, Hodgson never discusses or even mentions corporations. This article explains that corporations are absent from Hodgson’s discussion because he considers only the consumption side of general equilibrium theory (GET), and it shows that if Hodgson had included corporations and the production side, his overall (...)
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  50. Vincent Brümmer (1994). Calvin, Bernard and the Freedom of the Will. Religious Studies 30 (4):437 - 455.score: 18.0
    In his "Institutes" 2.2.5 Calvin declares that he 'willingly accepts' the distinction between freedom from necessity, from sin and from misery originally developed by St Bernard. It is remarkable that a determinist like Calvin seems here to accept a libertarian view of human freedom. In this paper I set out Bernard's doctrine of the three kinds of freedom and show that all its basic elements can in fact be found in Calvin's argument in chapters 2 and 3 of (...)
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