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  1. Bernard Linsky (forthcoming). Philosophy After Quine. Eidos.
    As a survey included in an issue devoted to W.V. Quine this article contains a list of sixteen distinctively Quinean theses and a brief discussion of the influence of several of them on contemporary philosophy. In particular, I mention how Quine's views have had a profound influence on contemporary discussions of the nature of logic, the theory of meaning and on realism. Many who explicitly reject some of his more controversial doctrines may not have worked out the interconnections of theses (...)
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  2. Bernard Linsky (2012). Carolyn Swanson, Reburial of Nonexistents: Reconsidering the Meinong-Russell Debate. Grazer Philosophische Studien 85 (1):342-346.
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  3. Kenneth Blackwell, Nicholas Griffin & Bernard Linsky (eds.) (2011). Principia Mathematica at 100. Bertrand Russell Research Centre.
  4. Bernard Linsky (2011). Critical Notice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):469-481.
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  5. Bernard Linsky (2011). Critical Notice of Richard Gaskin's The Unity of the Proposition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):469-481.
    According to Richard Gaskin, The Problem of the Unity of the Proposition is to explain 'what distinguishes propositions from mere aggregates, and enables them to be true or false' (18).1 This problem arises from the simpler problem of distinguishing a sentence from a 'mere list' of words (1). The unity of a sentence is due to its syntax, a level of structure which is not apparent in the string of words which are uttered or written, and which distinguishes a sentence (...)
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  6. Bernard Linsky (2011). Richard Gaskin, The Unity of the Proposition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):469-481.
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  7. Bernard Linsky (2011). The Evolution of Principia Mathematica: Bertrand Russell's Manuscripts and Notes for the Second Edition. Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in 1910, Principia Mathematica led to the development of mathematical logic and computers and thus to information sciences. It became a model for modern analytic philosophy and remains an important work. In the late 1960s the Bertrand Russell Archives at McMaster University in Canada obtained Russell's papers, letters and library. These archives contained the manuscripts for the new Introduction and three Appendices that Russell added to the second edition in 1925. Also included was another manuscript, 'The Hierarchy of (...)
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  8. Bernard Linsky (2011). The Unity of the Proposition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):469-481.
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  9. Bernard Linsky (2010). Review of Omar Nasim, Bertrand Russell and the Edwardian Philosophers: Constructing the World. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (1).
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  10. Bernard Linsky (2009). Logical Types in Some Arguments About Knowability and Belief. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.
     
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  11. Bernard Linsky (2009). Russell And Frege On The Logic of Functions. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 4 (1):1-17.
    I compare Russell’s theory of mathematical functions, the “descriptive functions” from Principia Mathematica ∗30, with Frege’s well known account of functions as “unsaturated” entities. Russell analyses functional terms with propositional functions and the theory of definite descriptions. This is the primary technical role of the theory of descriptions in P M . In Principles of Mathematics and some unpublished writings from before 1905, Russell offered explicit criticisms of Frege’s account of functions. Consequenly, the theory of descriptions in “On Denoting” can (...)
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  12. Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Bernard Linsky (2009). Russell Vs. Frege on Definite Descriptions as Singular Terms. In Nicholas Griffin & Dale Jacquette (eds.), Russell Vs. Meinong: The Legacy of "on Denoting". Routledge.
    In ‘On Denoting’ and to some extent in ‘Review of Meinong and Others, Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie’, published in the same issue of Mind (Russell, 1905a,b), Russell presents not only his famous elimination (or contextual defi nition) of defi nite descriptions, but also a series of considerations against understanding defi nite descriptions as singular terms. At the end of ‘On Denoting’, Russell believes he has shown that all the theories that do treat defi nite descriptions as singular terms fall (...)
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  13. Bernard Linsky, Logical Constructions. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  14. Bernard Linsky (2008). Review of Keith Green, Bertrand Russell, Language and Linguistic Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (8).
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  15. Bernard Linsky, The Notation in Principia Mathematica. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  16. Bernard Linsky (2007). Logical Analysis and Logical Construction. In Micahel Beaney (ed.), The Analytic Turn. Routledge. 107--122.
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  17. Bernard Linsky (2006). General Terms as Rigid Designators. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 128 (3):655 - 667.
    According to Scott Soames’ Beyond Rigidity, there are two important pieces of unfinished business left over from Saul Kripke’s influential Naming and Necessity. Soames reads Kripke’s arguments about names as primarily negative, that is, as proving that names don’t have a meaning expressible by definite descriptions or clusters of them. The famous Kripkean doctrine that names are rigid designators is really only part of the negative case. The thesis that names refer to the same object with respect to every possible (...)
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  18. Bernard Linsky (2006). Review: General Terms as Rigid Designators. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 128 (3):655 - 667.
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  19. Bernard Linsky & Edward N. Zalta (2006). What is Neologicism? Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):60-99.
    In this paper, we investigate (1) what can be salvaged from the original project of "logicism" and (2) what is the best that can be done if we lower our sights a bit. Logicism is the view that "mathematics is reducible to logic alone", and there are a variety of reasons why it was a non-starter. We consider the various ways of weakening this claim so as to produce a "neologicism". Three ways are discussed: (1) expand the conception of logic (...)
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  20. Bernard Linsky (2005). Russell's Notes on Frege for Appendix A of The Principles of Mathematics. Russell 24 (2):133-172.
    This article presents notes that Russell made while reading the works of Gottlob Frege in 1902. These works include Frege's books as well as the packet of off-prints Frege sent at Russell's request in June of that year. Russell relied on these notes while composing "Appendix A: The Logical and Arithmetical Doctrines of Frege" to add to The Principles of Mathematics, which was then in press. A transcription of the marginal comments in those works of Frege appeared in the previous (...)
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  21. Bernard Linsky (2005). Remarks on Platonized Naturalism. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):3-15.
    A discussion of views first presented by this author and Edward Zalta in 1995 in the paper “Naturalized Platonism vs. Platonized Naturalism”. That paper presents an application of Zalta’s “object theory” to the ontology of mathematics, and claims that there is a plenitude of abstract objects, all the creatures of distinct mathematical theories. After a summary of the position, two questions concerning the view are singled out for discussion: just how many mathematical objects there are by our account, and the (...)
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  22. Bernard Linsky (2004). Leon Chwistek on the No-Classes Theory inPrincipia Mathematica. History and Philosophy of Logic 25 (1):53-71.
    Leon Chwistek's 1924 paper ?The Theory of Constructive Types? is cited in the list of recent ?contributions to mathematical logic? in the second edition of Principia Mathematica, yet its prefatory criticisms of the no-classes theory have been seldom noticed. This paper presents a transcription of the relevant section of Chwistek's paper, comments on the significance of his arguments, and traces the reception of the paper. It is suggested that while Russell was aware of Chwistek's points, they were not important in (...)
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  23. Andreas Dorschel, Richard A. Watson, Tom Sorell, David M. A. Campbell & Bernard Linsky (2003). History of Philosophy. Philosophical Books 44 (2):162-168.
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  24. Bernard Linsky (2003). A Companion to Analytic Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):139-140.
    A Companion to Analytic Philosophy is a comprehensive guide to many significant analytic philosophers and concepts of the last hundred years. Provides a comprehensive guide to many of the most significant analytic philosophers of the last one hundred years. Offers clear and extensive analysis of profound concepts such as truth, goodness, knowledge, and beauty. Written by some of the most distinguished philosophers alive, some of whom have entries in the book devoted to them.
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  25. Bernard Linsky (2003). Critical Studies/Book Reviews. Philosophia Mathematica 11 (2):223-225.
  26. Bernard Linsky (2003). 11 The Metaphysics of Logical Atomism. In Nicholas Griffin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Bertrand Russell. Cambridge University Press. 371.
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  27. Bernard Linsky (2002). The Resolution of Russell's Paradox in "Principia Mathematica". Noûs 36 (s16):395 - 417.
  28. Bernard Linsky (2002). Russell's Logical Form, LF, and Truth Conditions. In Gerhard Preyer Georg Peter (ed.), Logical Form and Language. Oxford University Press. 391--408.
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  29. Bernard Linsky (2002). Review of Carl Gillett , Barry Loewer (Eds.), Physicalism and its Discontents. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (8).
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  30. Bernard Linsky (2001). Placing Abstract Objects in Naturalism. Philosophical Inquiry 23 (1-2):73-85.
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  31. Bernard Linsky (2001). The Worlds of Possibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):483-486.
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  32. J. Dejnozka & Bernard Linsky (2000). REVIEWS-Bertrand Russell on Modality and Logical Relevance. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 6 (1):95-96.
     
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  33. Bernard Linsky (2000). Review: Jan Dejnožka, Bertrand Russell on Modality and Logical Relevance. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 6 (1):95-96.
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  34. Bernard Linsky (1997). Bertrand Russell John G. Slater Bristol: Thoemmes, 1994, Xii + 171 Pp., $67.50; Paper $26.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 36 (01):207-.
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  35. Bernard Linsky (1996). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 4 (1):73-78.
  36. Bernard Linsky & Edward N. Zalta (1996). In Defense of the Contingently Nonconcrete. Philosophical Studies 84 (2-3):283-294.
    In "Actualism or Possibilism?" (Philosophical Studies, 84 (2-3), December 1996), James Tomberlin develops two challenges for actualism. The challenges are to account for the truth of certain sentences without appealing to merely possible objects. After canvassing the main actualist attempts to account for these phenomena, he then criticizes the new conception of actualism that we described in our paper "In Defense of the Simplest Quantified Modal Logic" (Philosophical Perspectives 8: Philosophy of Logic and Language, Atascadero, CA: Ridgeview, 1994). We respond (...)
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  37. Bernard Linsky & Edward N. Zalta (1995). Current Periodical Articles 705. Argument 92 (11).
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  38. Bernard Linsky & Edward N. Zalta (1995). Naturalized Platonism Versus Platonized Naturalism. Journal of Philosophy 92 (10):525-555.
    In this paper, we develop an alternative strategy, Platonized Naturalism, for reconciling naturalism and Platonism and to account for our knowledge of mathematical objects and properties. A systematic (Principled) Platonism based on a comprehension principle that asserts the existence of a plenitude of abstract objects is not just consistent with, but required (on transcendental grounds) for naturalism. Such a comprehension principle is synthetic, and it is known a priori. Its synthetic a priori character is grounded in the fact that it (...)
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  39. Bernard Linsky (1994). G. W. Fitch's Paleontology. Philosophical Studies 73 (2-3):189 - 193.
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  40. Bernard Linsky (1994). Truth Makers for Modal Propositions. The Monist 77 (2):192-206.
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  41. Bernard Linsky & Edward N. Zalta (1994). In Defense of the Simplest Quantified Modal Logic. Philosophical Perspectives 8 (Logic and Language):431-458.
    The simplest quantified modal logic combines classical quantification theory with the propositional modal logic K. The models of simple QML relativize predication to possible worlds and treat the quantifier as ranging over a single fixed domain of objects. But this simple QML has features that are objectionable to actualists. By contrast, Kripke-models, with their varying domains and restricted quantifiers, seem to eliminate these features. But in fact, Kripke-models also have features to which actualists object. Though these philosophers have introduced variations (...)
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  42. Bernard Linsky (1993). Editorial. Philosophical Studies 69 (2-3):1-1.
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  43. Bernard Linsky (1993). Paradoxes of Belief and Strategic Rationality (Cambridge Studies in Probability, Induction, Decision Theory). Philosophical Books 34 (1):27-28.
  44. Bernard Linsky (1992). Editorial. Philosophical Studies 65 (1-2):1-1.
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  45. Bernard Linsky (1992). J. Alberto Coffa, The Semantic Tradition From Kant to Carnap; To the Vienna Station Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (4):233-235.
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  46. Bernard Linsky (1992). The Logical Form of Descriptions. Dialogue 31 (04):677-.
    This critical notice of Stephen Neale's "Descriptions", (MIT Press, 1990) summarizes the content of the book and presents several objections to its arguments, as well as praising Neale for showing just how close the linguistic notion of L F is to the analytic philosopher's notion of "logical form". It is claimed that Neale's use of generalized quantifiers to represent definite descriptions from Russell's account by which descriptions are "incomplete symbols". I also argue that his assessment of the Quine/Smullyan exchange about (...)
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  47. Bernard Linsky (1991). A Note on the ``Carving Up Content'' Principle in Frege's Theory of Sense. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 33 (1):126-135.
  48. Bernard Linsky (1991). Truth at a World is a Modality. Philosophia 20 (4):387-394.
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  49. Bernard Linsky (1991). The Infinite. Philosophical Books 32 (1):62-64.
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  50. Bernard Linsky & Edward N. Zalta (1991). Is Lewis a Meinongian? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (4):438–453.
    The views of David Lewis and the Meinongians are both often met with an incredulous stare. This is not by accident. The stunned disbelief that usually accompanies the stare is a natural first reaction to a large ontology. Indeed, Lewis has been explicitly linked with Meinong, a charge that he has taken great pains to deny. However, the issue is not a simple one. "Meinongianism" is a complex set of distinctions and doctrines about existence and predication, in addition to the (...)
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