Search results for 'Bernard Shaw' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George Bernard Shaw (2003). Shaw on Chesterton's Ireland. The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):211-216.score: 540.0
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  2. Devin Zane Shaw (2012). Bernard Stiegler, For a New Critique of Political Economy. [REVIEW] Symposium 16 (1):282-286.score: 360.0
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  3. Bernard Shaw & Eleanor Rathbone (1898). Book Review:Forecasts of the Coming Century. A. R. Wallace, Tom Mann, H. Russell Smart, William Morris, H. S. Salt, Enid Stacy, Margaret McMillan, Grant Allen, Edward Carpenter. [REVIEW] Ethics 8 (2):257-.score: 240.0
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  4. L. P. Jacks, G. Bernard Shaw, C. Delisle Burns & H. D. Oakeley (1916). Symposium: Ethical Principles of Social Reconstruction. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 17:256 - 299.score: 240.0
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  5. Bernard Shaw (1944). Everybody's Political What's What. New York, Dodd, Mead.score: 240.0
     
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  6. Piers J. Hale (2010). Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):17 - 66.score: 192.0
    During the British socialist revival of the 1880s competing theories of evolution were central to disagreements about strategy for social change. In News from Nowhere (1891), William Morris had portrayed socialism as the result of Lamarckian processes, and imagined a non-Malthusian future. H.G. Wells, an enthusiastic admirer of Morris in the early days of the movement, became disillusioned as a result of the Malthusianism he learnt from Huxley and his subsequent rejection of Lamarckism in light of Weismann's experiments on mice. (...)
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  7. James Hill (1994). Bernard Shaw and the Doctors: The Art and Science of Medicine inThe Doctor's Dilemma. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 15 (2):93-99.score: 180.0
    What did Bernard Shaw really think about doctors? Although any reader with a sketchy understanding of Shaw's work is inclined to think that he condened the entire profession, a careful reading of his most well-known play featuring medical practitioners reveals a mixed attitude. InThe Doctor's Dilemma, one finds a position that may be representative of Shaw's attitude. In this play, he places the entire Edwardian medical establishment—consultants and general practitioners — on stage, and he focuses the (...)
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  8. Jaysankar Lal Shaw & Purusottama Bilimoria (eds.) (2006). Contemporary Philosophy and J.L. Shaw. Punthi Pustak.score: 180.0
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  9. C. Shaw (2001). Chris Shaw on Ethical Issues in Biotechnology. Interview by Thomasine Kushner. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: Cq: The International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees 11 (1):97-101.score: 180.0
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  10. Mark Bevir (1992). The Marxism of George Bernard Shaw 1883-1889. History of Political Thought 13 (2):299-318.score: 156.0
    There remains a strange gap between Shaw's biographers who assert the importance of Marxism for Shaw during the 1880s and intellectual historians who deny the importance of Marxism for Shaw during the 1880s. My intention is to close this gap by placing Shaw's early beliefs in the context of contemporary Marxism, thereby showing that Shaw was a Marxist and even that his version of Fabianism retained features of his earlier Marxism. Further, I hope thereby to (...)
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  11. John Allett (2001). Bernard Shaw, the Doctor's Dilemma: Scarcity, Socialism, and the Sanctity of Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (2):227-245.score: 150.0
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  12. William Mackintire Salter (1908). Mr. Bernard Shaw as a Social Critic. International Journal of Ethics 18 (4):446-458.score: 150.0
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  13. John Allett (1995). Bernard Shaw and Dirty Hands Politics: A Comparison of Mrs. Warren's Profession and Major Barbara. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (2):32-45.score: 150.0
  14. C. Delisle Burns (1928). Book Review:The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Socialism and Capitalism. Bernard Shaw. [REVIEW] Ethics 39 (1):109-.score: 150.0
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  15. Sidney P. Albert (1956). Bernard Shaw: The Artist as Philosopher. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (4):419-438.score: 150.0
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  16. Eugene Gates (forthcoming). The Music Criticism and Aesthetics of George Bernard Shaw. Journal of Aesthetic Education.score: 150.0
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  17. M. S. Gilliland (1893). Book Review:Four Lectures on Henrik Ibsen, Dealing Chiefly with His Metrical Works. Philip H. Wicksteed; The Quintessence of Ibsenism. G. Bernard Shaw. [REVIEW] Ethics 3 (3):399-.score: 150.0
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  18. C. J. Bond (1929). Eugenics and Bernard Shaw. The Eugenics Review 21 (2):159.score: 150.0
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  19. Patrick Cahill (1996). Debate Between Father Vincent McNabb and George Bernard Shaw, September 1931. The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):211-213.score: 150.0
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  20. Michael Holroyd (1979). George Bernard Shaw: Women and the Body Politic. Critical Inquiry 6 (1):17.score: 150.0
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  21. Rolf Verleger & Rebekka Lencer (2004). Are the DTI Results Positive Evidence for George Bernard Shaw's View? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):866-866.score: 150.0
    We discuss how Burns' conception may be further extended to integrate research on eye movement abnormalities, but then point to a contradiction between Burns' conception of schizophrenia as the genetic price for human social life and the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data, which constitute his central piece of evidence.
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  22. Renée M. Deacon (1973). Bernard Shaw as Artist-Philosopher: An Exposition of Shavianism. [Folcroft, Pa.]Folcroft Library Editions.score: 150.0
     
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  23. Martin Ellehauge (1931/1966). The Position of Bernard Shaw in European Drama and Philosophy. New York, Haskell House.score: 150.0
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  24. Gareth Griffith (1985). George Bernard Shaw's Argument for Equality of Income'. History of Political Thought 6 (3).score: 150.0
     
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  25. Michael Holroyd (1998). Excerpt From Michael Holroyd's Biography of George Bernard Shaw. The Chesterton Review 24 (4):533-541.score: 150.0
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  26. Michael Holroyd (2000). George Bernard Shaw and the New Age. The Chesterton Review 26 (1/2):243-243.score: 150.0
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  27. Joseph Mitchell (2008). A Satiric View of Bernard Shaw. The Chesterton Review 34 (1-2):323-332.score: 150.0
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  28. Isobel Murray (1987). "Bernard Shaw: Collected Letters 1911-1925," Edited by Dan H. Laurence. The Chesterton Review 13 (1):116-119.score: 150.0
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  29. Isobel Murray (1989). "Bernard Shaw, Volume 1, 1856-1898: The Search for Love," by Michael Holroyd; and "Bernard Shaw: Collected Letters 1926-1950," Ed. Dan H. Laurence. [REVIEW] The Chesterton Review 15 (3):381-387.score: 150.0
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  30. R. N. Roy (1964/1976). Bernard Shaw's Philosophy of Life. Norwood Editions.score: 150.0
     
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  31. Glen McBride (2012). Why I Find Myself a Humanist. Australian Humanist, The 108 (108):4.score: 30.0
    McBride, Glen I was brought up a good Anglican boy by two non-religious parents. My mother was probably an incipient feminist. I knew my father better but never heard him discuss anything religious. At 19, I arrived in England, a bookworm in the RAAF and discovered George Bernard Shaw in perhaps the most exciting mind-opening time of my life. He introduced me to the word 'agnostic' and made it clear that no one had anything worth saying for or (...)
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  32. Graham Oddie (2001). Recombinant Values. Philosophical Studies 106 (3):259 - 292.score: 30.0
    An attractive admirer of George Bernard Shaw once wrote to him with a not-so modest proposal: ``You have the greatest brain in the world, and I have the most beautiful body; so we ought to produce the most perfect child.'' Shaw replied: ``What if the child inherits my body and your brains?''What if, indeed? Shaw's retort is interesting not because it revealsa grasp of elementary genetics, but rather because it suggests his grasp of an interesting and (...)
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  33. Peter J. Bowler (2001). Reconciling Science and Religion: THE DEBATE IN EARLY-TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN. University of Chicago Press.score: 30.0
    Although much has been written about the vigorous debates over science and religion in the Victorian era, little attention has been paid to their continuing importance in early twentieth-century Britain. Reconciling Science and Religion provides a comprehensive survey of the interplay between British science and religion from the late nineteenth century to World War II. Peter J. Bowler argues that unlike the United States, where a strong fundamentalist opposition to evolutionism developed in the 1920s (most famously expressed in the Scopes (...)
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  34. Lauren Freeman (2010). Metontology , Moral Particularism, and the “Art of Existing:” A Dialogue Between Heidegger, Aristotle, and Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):545-568.score: 24.0
    An important shift occurs in Martin Heidegger’s thinking one year after the publication of Being and Time , in the Appendix to the Metaphysical Foundations of Logic . The shift is from his project of fundamental ontology—which provides an existential analysis of human existence on an ontological level—to metontology . Metontology is a neologism that refers to the ontic sphere of human experience and to the regional ontologies that were excluded from Being and Time. It is within metontology, Heidegger states, (...)
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  35. Margaret A. Simons & Helene N. Peters (2004). Introduction to Beauvoir's "Analysis of Claude Bernard's Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine&Quot;. In Margaret A. Simons, Marybeth Timmermann & Mary Beth Mader (eds.), Philosophical Writings. University of Illinois Press. 15-22.score: 24.0
    In December 1924 when Simone de Beauvoir almost certainly wrote her essay analyzing Claude Bernard's "Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine," a classic text in the philosophy of science, she was a 16 yr old student in a senior-level philosophy class at a private Catholic girls' school. Given the popular conception of existentialism as anti science, Beauvoir's early interest in science, reflected in her baccalaureate successes as well as her paper on Bernard, may be surprising. But her (...)
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  36. Alex Voorhoeve (2004). A Mistrustful Animal: Bernard Williams Interviewed. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):81-92.score: 24.0
    A discussion with Bernard Williams about main themes in his work. (Note: a version of this interview appears in 'Conversations on Ethics' (OUP, 2009).).
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  37. Ulrich Charpa (2006). Mister Bixby, Monsieur Bernard, and Some Other 19th Century Scientist–Philosophers on Knowledge-Based Actions. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (2):257 - 268.score: 24.0
    Following Mr. Bixby and some other 19th century scientist-philosophers such as Claude Bernard, relevant scientific actions should, as a matter of primary importance, be explained with reference to the competence and not to the intentions of those involved. The background is a reliabilist virtue approach - a widespread tendency in 19th century epistemology and philosophy of science. Bixby's approach includes a critique of some constructivist arguments and establishes a mutually supportive connection to conceptions of scientific progress.
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  38. Gustavo Caponi, Claude Bernard, Charles Darwin y los dos modos fundamentales de interrogar lo viviente.score: 24.0
    Research in modern biology has largely been developed according to two main ways of inquiry, as they were outlined by Charles Darwin and Claude Bernard. Each stands for a specific approach to the living corresponding to two different methodological rules: the principle of natural selection and the principle of causation.
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  39. Andrey Ivanov (2012). St. Bernard: Apology and Architectural Art. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):179-186.score: 24.0
    Este artigo busca expor as críticas de Bernardo de Claraval às superfluidades humanas no texto da Apologia, especialmente aquelas referentes à arte arquitetural. Em segundo lugar, procura analisar as implicações estéticas do ascetismo cisterciense e bernardiano. As críticas de Bernardo exercem uma influência decisiva na ornamentação e fazem nascer uma nova arquitetura. This paper is to expose the criticism of human superfluities at Bernard of Clairvaux in the text of the Apology, especially those related to architectural art. Secondly, analyzes (...)
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  40. Christian Maurer (2014). What Can an Egoist Say Against an Egoist? On Archibald Campbell's Criticisms of Bernard Mandeville. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):1-18.score: 24.0
    Like Bernard Mandeville, Archibald Campbell develops a profoundly egoistic conception of human psychology. However, Campbell attacks numerous points in Mandeville’s moral philosophy, in particular Mandeville’s treatment of self-love, the desire for esteem, and human nature in general as corrupt. He also criticises Mandeville’s corresponding insistence on self-denial and his rigorist conception of luxury. Campbell himself is subsequently attacked by Scottish orthodox Calvinists - not for his egoism, but for his optimism regarding postlapsarian human nature and self-love. This episode demonstrates (...)
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  41. Robert Arnautu (2010). Bernard Miege, Societatea cucerita de comunicare/ Society Conquered by Communication. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):144-147.score: 24.0
    Bernard Miege, Societatea cucerita de comunicare Ed. Polirom, Iasi, 2004.
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  42. Ricardo Da Costa (2009). Transcendence above immanence: the Soul in mysticism of Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153). Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 26:97-105.score: 24.0
    This work will examine the concept of soul developed in mysticism of abbot Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153). For this, I will analyze extracts of five writings namely the Third Series of Sentences, three of his Liturgical Sermons, and the parabola The Three Children of the King.
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  43. Eileen De Neeve (2010). Interpreting Bernard Lonergan's General Theory of Economic Dynamics: Does It Complete Hayek, Keynes and Schumpeter? Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 5.score: 24.0
    The paper reviews links between Bernard Lonergan's theory of innovative economic growth and cycles, and the ideas of Friedrich Hayek, John Maynard Keynes, and Joseph Schumpeter. They were contemporary economists, who remain influential today. For Lonergan, although markets define what is bought and sold in an exchange economy, production decisions are more fundamental. These decisions are choices about the direction of development, the standard of living, and variations in the distribution of wealth in a modern society. The paper shows (...)
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  44. Anders Kruse Ljungdalh (2013). Experimenting with Styles of Living: Bernard, Canguilhem and Type 2 Diabetes Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (3):369-383.score: 24.0
    The paper links a debate in the history of medical science between statistics and the experimental method with contemporary diabetes educational practices. An empirical example of a tension between neglect and concern in diabetes self-regulation frames the subsequent theoretical discussion between first, Claude Bernard and statistics and afterwards, Georges Canguilhem as a correlative to Bernard. Through these philosophers of medical science a connection between the experimental method and education is demonstrated. Finally, a case description of an experimental approach (...)
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  45. Tad Dunne, Bernard Lonergan. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  46. John Tillson (2013). Is Knowledge What It Claims to Be? Bernard Williams and the Absolute Conception. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (8):860-873.score: 21.0
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  47. Richard Foley (1981). Compatibilism: A Reply to Shaw. Mind 90 (April):287-288.score: 21.0
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  48. D. N. Byrne (2013). After Tocqueville – the Curious Adventures of Bernard-Henri Lévy and Don Watson. [REVIEW] Australian Review of Public Affairs - Drawing Board.score: 21.0
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  49. Jean Leclercq (2011). Voir le monde par les affects : Bernard de Clairvaux et la voie monastique. Revue des Sciences Philosophiques Et Théologiques 2:323-341.score: 21.0
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  50. Lorenzo Greco (2012). Reflection and the Individual in Bernard Williams. Iride 25 (1):103-118.score: 21.0
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