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  1. Tal Makovski, Bernhard Hommel & Glyn Humphreys (2014). Early and Late Selection: Effects of Load, Dilution and Salience. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  2. Lorenza S. Colzato, Roberta Sellaro, Manuel J. Ruiz, Katarzyna Sikora & Bernhard Hommel (2013). Acute Khat Use Reduces Response Conflict in Habitual Users. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  3. Lorenza S. Colzato, Ayca Szapora Ozturk, Justine Nienke Pannekoek & Bernhard Hommel (2013). The Impact of Physical Exercise on Convergent and Divergent Thinking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:824.
    Anecdotal literature suggests that creative people sometimes use bodily movement to help overcome mental blocks and lack of inspiration. Several studies have shown that physical exercise may sometimes enhance creative thinking, but the evidence is still inconclusive. In this study we investigated whether creativity in convergent- and divergent-thinking tasks is affected by acute moderate and intense physical exercise in athletes (n=48) and non-athletes (n=48). Exercise interfered with divergent thinking in both groups. The impact on convergent thinking, the task that presumably (...)
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  4. Andreas B. Eder & Bernhard Hommel (2013). Anticipatory Control of Approach and Avoidance: An Ideomotor Approach. Emotion Review 5 (3):275-279.
    This article reviews evidence suggesting that the cause of approach and avoidance behavior lies not so much in the presence (i.e., the stimulus) but, rather, in the behavior’s anticipated future consequences (i.e., the goal): Approach is motivated by the goal to produce a desired consequence or end-state, while avoidance is motivated by the goal to prevent an undesired consequence or end-state. However, even though approach and avoidance are controlled by goals rather than stimuli, affective stimuli can influence action control by (...)
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  5. Bernhard Hommel (2013). Dancing in the Dark: No Role for Consciousness in Action Control. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Dancing in the dark: no role for consciousness in action control.
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  6. Mikael A. Kowal, Arno Hazekamp, Lorenza S. Colzato, Henk van Steenbergen & Bernhard Hommel (2013). Modulation of Cognitive and Emotional Processing by Cannabidiol: The Role of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  7. Susan A. Reedijk, Anne Bolders & Bernhard Hommel (2013). The Impact of Binaural Beats on Creativity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:786.
    Human creativity relies on a multitude of cognitive processes, some of which are influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine. This suggests that creativity could be enhanced by interventions that either modulate the production or transmission of dopamine directly, or affect dopamine-driven processes. In the current study we hypothesized that creativity can be influenced by means of binaural beats, an auditory illusion that is considered a form of cognitive entrainment that operates through stimulating neuronal phase locking. We aimed to investigate whether binaural (...)
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  8. Katharina Zwosta, Bernhard Hommel, Thomas Goschke & Rico Fischer (2013). Mood States Determine the Degree of Task Shielding in Dual-Task Performance. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1142-1152.
  9. Lorenza S. Colzato, Ayca Ozturk & Bernhard Hommel (2012). Meditate to Create: The Impact of Focused-Attention and Open-Monitoring Training on Convergent and Divergent Thinking. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  10. Rico Fischer & Bernhard Hommel (2012). Deep Thinking Increases Task-Set Shielding and Reduces Shifting Flexibility in Dual-Task Performance. Cognition 123 (2):303-307.
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  11. Jesse Van Muijden, Guido Ph Band & Bernhard Hommel (2012). Online Games Training Aging Brains: Limited Transfer to Cognitive Control Functions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
    The prevalence of age-related cognitive decline will increase due to graying of the global population. The goal of the present study was to test whether playing online cognitive training games can improve cognitive control (CC) in healthy older adults. Fifty-four older adults (age 60-77) played five different cognitive training games online for 30 minutes a day over a period of seven weeks (game group). Another group of 20 older adults (age 61-73) instead answered quiz questions about documentaries online (documentary group). (...)
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  12. Poppy Watson, Sanne De Wit, Bernhard Hommel & Reinout W. Wiers (2012). Motivational Mechanisms and Outcome Expectancies Underlying the Approach Bias Toward Addictive Substances. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Human behavior can be paradoxical, in that actions can be initiated that are seemingly incongruent with an individual’s explicit desires. This is most commonly observed in drug addiction, where maladaptive behavior (i.e. drug seeking) appears to be compulsive, continuing at great personal cost. Approach biases towards addictive substances have been correlated with actual drug-use in a number of studies, suggesting that this measure can, in some cases, index everyday maladaptive tendencies. At present it is unclear whether this bias to drug (...)
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  13. Lorenza S. Colzato, Manuel Ruiz, Wery Pm van den Wildenberg, Maria Teresa Bajo & Bernhard Hommel (2011). Long-Term Effects of Chronic Khat Use: Impaired Inhibitory Control. Frontiers in Psychology 1:219.
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  14. Lorenza S. Colzato, Jesse van Muijden, Guido Ph Band & Bernhard Hommel (2011). Genetic Modulation of Training and Transfer in Older Adults: BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism is Associated with Wider Useful Field of View. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  15. Bernhard Hommel, Lorenza S. Colzato, Rico Fischer & Ingrid K. Christoffels (2011). Bilingualism and Creativity: Benefits in Convergent Thinking Come with Losses in Divergent Thinking. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  16. Bernhard Hommel, Lorenza S. Colzato, Claudia Scorolli, Anna M. Borghi & Wery P. M. van den Wildenberg (2011). Religion and Action Control: Faith-Specific Modulation of the Simon Effect but Not Stop-Signal Performance. Cognition 120 (2):177-185.
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  17. Bernhard Hommel, Jutta Kray & Ulman Lindenberger (2011). Feature Integration Across the Lifespan: Stickier Stimulus–Response Bindings in Children and Older Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
    Humans integrate the features of perceived events and of action plans into episodic event files. Here we investigated whether children (9-10 years), younger adults (20-31 years), and older adults (64-76 years) differ in the flexibility of managing (creating and updating) event files. Relative to young adults, performance in children and older adults was more hampered by partial mismatches between present and previous stimulus-response relations, suggesting less efficient updating of episodic stimulus-response representations in childhood and old age. Results are discussed in (...)
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  18. Heiko Reuss, Andrea Kiesel, Wilfried Kunde & Bernhard Hommel (2011). Unconscious Activation of Task Sets. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):556-567.
  19. Saskia van Dantzig, Antonino Raffone & Bernhard Hommel (2011). Acquiring Contextualized Concepts: A Connectionist Approach. Cognitive Science 35 (6):1162-1189.
    Conceptual knowledge is acquired through recurrent experiences, by extracting statistical regularities at different levels of granularity. At a fine level, patterns of feature co-occurrence are categorized into objects. At a coarser level, patterns of concept co-occurrence are categorized into contexts. We present and test CONCAT, a connectionist model that simultaneously learns to categorize objects and contexts. The model contains two hierarchically organized CALM modules (Murre, Phaf, & Wolters, 1992). The first module, the Object Module, forms object representations based on co-occurrences (...)
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  20. Henk Van Steenbergen, Guido Ph Band & Bernhard Hommel (2011). Threat but Not Arousal Narrows Attention: Evidence From Pupil Dilation and Saccade Control. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  21. Sharon Zmigrod & Bernhard Hommel (2011). The Relationship Between Feature Binding and Consciousness: Evidence From Asynchronous Multi-Modal Stimuli. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):586-593.
  22. Soghra Akbari Chermahini & Bernhard Hommel (2010). The (B)Link Between Creativity and Dopamine: Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates Predict and Dissociate Divergent and Convergent Thinking. Cognition 115 (3):458-465.
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  23. Lorenza S. Colzato, Ilja van Beest, Wery P. M. van den Wildenberg, Claudia Scorolli, Shirley Dorchin, Nachshon Meiran, Anna M. Borghi & Bernhard Hommel (2010). God: Do I Have Your Attention? Cognition 117 (1):87-94.
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  24. Lorenza S. Colzato, Bernhard Hommel & Kimron Shapiro (2010). Religion and the Attentional Blink: Depth of Faith Predicts Depth of the Blink. Frontiers in Psychology 1:147.
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  25. Lorenza S. Colzato, Bernhard Hommel, Wery Pm van den Wildenberg & Shulan Hsieh (2010). Buddha as an Eye Opener: A Link Between Prosocial Attitude and Attentional Control. Frontiers in Psychology 1.
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  26. Lorenza S. Colzato, Jay Pratt & Bernhard Hommel (2010). Dopaminergic Control of Attentional Flexibility: Inhibition of Return is Associated with the Dopamine Transporter Gene (DAT1). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.
  27. Lorenza S. Colzato, Linda Van Hooidonk, Wery Van Den Wildenberg, Fieke Harinck & Bernhard Hommel (2010). Sexual Orientation Biases Attentional Control: A Possible Gaydar Mechanism. Frontiers in Psychology 1:13.
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  28. Lorenza S. Colzato, Pieter Ja van Leeuwen, Wery Van Den Wildenberg & Bernhard Hommel (2010). DOOM'd to Switch: Superior Cognitive Flexibility in Players of First Person Shooter Games. Frontiers in Psychology 1:8.
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  29. Bernhard Hommel (2010). Grounding Attention in Action Control: The Intentional Control of Selection. In Brian Bruya (ed.), Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. Mit Press. 121--140.
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  30. Bernhard Hommel (2010). Games with(Out) Frontiers: Toward an Integrated Science of Human Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 1.
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  31. Bernhard Hommel & Lorenza S. Colzato (2010). Religion as a Control Guide: On the Impact of Religion on Cognition. Zygon 45 (3):596-604.
    Religions commonly are taken to provide general orientation in leading one's life. We develop here the idea that religions also may have a much more concrete guidance function in providing systematic decision biases in the face of cognitive-control dilemmas. In particular, we assume that the selective reward that religious belief systems provide for rule-conforming behavior induces systematic biases in cognitive-control parameters that are functional in producing the wanted behavior. These biases serve as default values under uncertainty and affect performance in (...)
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  32. Pascal Haazebroek, Saskia Van Dantzig & Bernhard Hommel (2009). Towards a Computational Account of Context Mediated Affective Stimulus-Response Translation. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
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  33. Bernhard Hommel & Birgit Elsner (2009). Acquisition, Representation, and Control of Action. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press. 371--398.
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  34. Bernhard Hommel & Birgit Elsner (2009). The or‌s and Sources of Action. Acquisition, Representation, and Control of Action. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press.
     
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  35. Andreas B. Eder, Bernhard Hommel & Jan De Houwer (2007). How Distinctive is Affective Processing? On the Implications of Using Cognitive Paradigms to Study Affect and Emotion. Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1137-1154.
  36. Bernhard Hommel (2007). Consciousness and Control: Not Identical Twins. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1):155-176.
    Human cognition and action are intentional and goal-directed, and explaining how they are controlled is one of the most important tasks of the cognitive sciences. After half a century of benign neglect this task is enjoying increased attention. Unfortunately, however, current theorizing about control in general, and the role of consciousness for/in control in particular, suffers from major conceptual flaws that lead to confusion regarding the following distinctions: (i) automatic and unintentional processes, (ii) exogenous control and disturbance (in a control-theoretical (...)
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  37. Tristan Lavender & Bernhard Hommel (2007). Affect and Action: Towards an Event-Coding Account. Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1270-1296.
  38. Diego Alonso, Luis J. Fuentes & Bernhard Hommel (2006). Unconscious Symmetrical Inferences: A Role of Consciousness in Event Integration. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):386-396.
  39. Bernhard Hommel (2004). Event Files: Feature Binding in and Across Perception and Action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (11):494-500.
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  40. Bernhard Hommel (2004). Neural Mechanisms of Feature Integration. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (11):494-500.
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  41. Bernhard Hommel (2003). Acquisition and Control of Voluntary Action. In Sabine Maasen, Wolfgang Prinz & Gerhard Roth (eds.), Voluntary Action: Brains, Minds, and Sociality. Oxford University Press. 34--48.
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  42. N. Meiran, Bernhard Hommel, U. Bibi & I. Lev (2002). Consciousness and Control in Task Switching. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):10-33.
    Participants were required to switch among randomly ordered tasks, and instructional cues were used to indicate which task to execute. In Experiments 1 and 2, the participants indicated their readiness for the task switch before they received the target stimulus; thus, each trial was associated with two primary dependent measures: (1) readiness time and (2) target reaction time. Slow readiness responses and instructions emphasizing high readiness were paradoxically accompanied by slow target reaction time. Moreover, the effect of task switching on (...)
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  43. Wolfgang Prinz & Bernhard Hommel (eds.) (2002). Common Mechanisms in Perception and Action: Attention and Performance Volume XIX. OUP Oxford.
    The latest volume in the critically acclaimed and highly influential Attention and Performance series focuses on a subject at the heart of psychological research into human performance - the interplay between perception and action. What are the mechanisms that translate the information we receive via our senses into physical actions? How do the mechanisms responsible for producing a response from a given stimulus operate? Recently, new perspectives have emerged, drawing on studies from neuroscience and neurophysiology. Within this volume, state of (...)
     
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  44. Bernhard Hommel, Jochen Müsseler, Gisa Aschersleben & Wolfgang Prinz (2001). Codes and Their Vicissitudes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):910-926.
    First, we discuss issues raised with respect to the Theory of Event Coding (TEC)'s scope, that is, its limitations and possible extensions. Then, we address the issue of specificity, that is, the widespread concern that TEC is too unspecified and, therefore, too vague in a number of important respects. Finally, we elaborate on our views about TEC's relations to other important frameworks and approaches in the field like stages models, ecological approaches, and the two-visual-pathways model. Footnotes1 We acknowledge the precedence (...)
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  45. Bernhard Hommel, Jochen Müsseler, Gisa Aschersleben & Wolfgang Prinz (2001). The Theory of Event Coding (TEC): A Framework for Perception and Action Planning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):849-878.
    Traditional approaches to human information processing tend to deal with perception and action planning in isolation, so that an adequate account of the perception-action interface is still missing. On the perceptual side, the dominant cognitive view largely underestimates, and thus fails to account for, the impact of action-related processes on both the processing of perceptual information and on perceptual learning. On the action side, most approaches conceive of action planning as a mere continuation of stimulus processing, thus failing to account (...)
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  46. Terence V. Sewards, Mark A. Sewards, Nachshon Meiran, Bernhard Hommel, Uri Bibi, Idit Lev, Michael Schredl, Arthur T. Funkhouser, Claude M. Cornu & Hans-Peter Hirsbrunner (2001). Elisabeth Bacon, Jean-Marie Danion, Françoise Kauffmann-Muller, and Agnes Bruant. Conscious. Consciousness and Cognition 10:436.
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  47. Bernhard Hommel (2000). Intentional Control of Automatic Stimulus-Response Translation. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.
     
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