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Bernice S. Elger [16]Bernice Simone Elger [10]
  1. Bernice Simone Elger, Violet Handtke & Tenzin Wangmo (2015). Paternalistic Breaches of Confidentiality in Prison: Mental Health Professionals’ Attitudes and Justifications. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (6):496-500.
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  2.  15
    Raheleh Heidari, David Martin Shaw & Bernice Simone Elger (forthcoming). CRISPR and the Rebirth of Synthetic Biology. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-13.
    Emergence of novel genome engineering technologies such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat has refocused attention on unresolved ethical complications of synthetic biology. Biosecurity concerns, deontological issues and human right aspects of genome editing have been the subject of in-depth debate; however, a lack of transparent regulatory guidelines, outdated governance codes, inefficient time-consuming clinical trial pathways and frequent misunderstanding of the scientific potential of cutting-edge technologies have created substantial obstacles to translational research in this area. While a precautionary principle (...)
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  3. Alexander Morgan Capron, Alexandre Mauron, Bernice Simone Elger, Andrea Boggio, Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra & Nikola Biller-Andorno (2009). Ethical Norms and the International Governance of Genetic Databases and Biobanks: Findings From an International Study. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):101-124.
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  4. Bernice Simone Elger (2008). Medical Ethics in Correctional Healthcare: An International Comparison of Guidelines. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (3):234.
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  5.  5
    Tenzin Wangmo, Violet Handtke & Bernice Simone Elger (2014). Disclosure of Past Crimes: An Analysis of Mental Health Professionals' Attitudes Towards Breaching Confidentiality. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):347-358.
    Ensuring confidentiality is the cornerstone of trust within the doctor–patient relationship. However, health care providers have an obligation to serve not only their patient’s interests but also those of potential victims and society, resulting in circumstances where confidentiality must be breached. This article describes the attitudes of mental health professionals when patients disclose past crimes unknown to the justice system. Twenty-four MHPs working in Swiss prisons were interviewed. They shared their experiences concerning confidentiality practices and attitudes towards breaching confidentiality in (...)
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  6.  5
    Wiebke Bretschneider & Bernice Simone Elger (2014). Expert Perspectives on Western European Prison Health Services: Do Ageing Prisoners Receive Equivalent Care? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):319-332.
    Health care in prison and particularly the health care of older prisoners are increasingly important topics due to the growth of the ageing prisoner population. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the approaches used in the provision of equivalent health care to ageing prisoners and to confront the intuitive definition of equivalent care and the practical and ethical challenges that have been experienced by individuals working in this field. Forty interviews took place with experts working in (...)
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  7.  3
    Géraldine Ruiz, Tenzin Wangmo, Patrick Mutzenberg, Jessica Sinclair & Bernice Simone Elger (2014). Understanding Death in Custody: A Case for a Comprehensive Definition. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):387-398.
    Prisoners sometimes die in prison, either due to natural illness, violence, suicide, or a result of imprisonment. The purpose of this study is to understand deaths in custody using qualitative methodology and to argue for a comprehensive definition of death in custody that acknowledges deaths related to the prison environment. Interviews were conducted with 33 experts, who primarily work as lawyers or forensic doctors with national and/or international organisations. Responses were coded and analysed qualitatively. Defining deaths in custody according to (...)
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  8.  16
    Bernice S. Elger (2008). Research Involving Prisoners: Consensus and Controversies in International and European Regulations. Bioethics 22 (4):224–238.
    This article examines international and European regulations on research involving prisoners for consensus, differences, and their consequences, and offers a critical evaluation of the various approaches. Agreement exists that prisoners are at risk of coercion, which might interfere with their ability to provide voluntary informed consent to research. Controversy exists about the magnitude of this risk and the consequences that should follow from this risk. Two strategies are proposed for a method of protecting prisoners that does not lead to discrimination: (...)
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  9.  10
    Laura Y. Cabrera & Bernice S. Elger (forthcoming). Memory Interventions in the Criminal Justice System: Some Practical Ethical Considerations. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-9.
    In recent years, discussion around memory modification interventions has gained attention. However, discussion around the use of memory interventions in the criminal justice system has been mostly absent. In this paper we start by highlighting the importance memory has for human well-being and personal identity, as well as its role within the criminal forensic setting; in particular, for claiming and accepting legal responsibility, for moral learning, and for retribution. We provide examples of memory interventions that are currently available for medical (...)
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  10.  1
    Domnita O. Badarau, Eva De Clercq, Tenzin Wangmo, Monica Dragomir, Ingrid Miron, Thomas Kühne & Bernice S. Elger (2016). Cancer Care in Romania: Challenges and Pitfalls of Children's and Adolescents' Multifaceted Involvement. Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (12):757-761.
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  11.  4
    Milenko Rakic, Isabelle Wienand, David Shaw, Rebecca Nast & Bernice S. Elger (forthcoming). Autonomy and Fear of Synthetic Biology: How Can Patients’ Autonomy Be Enhanced in the Field of Synthetic Biology? A Qualitative Study with Stable Patients. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-14.
    We analyzed stable patients’ views regarding synthetic biology in general, the medical application of synthetic biology, and their potential participation in trials of synthetic biology in particular. The aim of the study was to find out whether patients’ views and preferences change after receiving more detailed information about synthetic biology and its clinical applications. The qualitative study was carried out with a purposive sample of 36 stable patients, who suffered from diabetes or gout. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, translated and fully (...)
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  12.  20
    Bernice S. Elger (2005). Attitudes of Future Lawyers and Psychologists to the Use of Genetic Testing for Criminal Behavior. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (3):329-345.
    Developments in the last several years have sparked renewed interest in the ethics of research involving humans. Issues relating to the global extent of research and its guiding principles are of particular importance to researchers, health officials, and individual ethics committees who want a deeper and more encompassing inquiry regarding the foundation and evolution of human research. This department of CQ launches a long overdue effort to explore these wider issues. Readers are invited to submit papers to Charles MacKay, 5011 (...)
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  13.  7
    Priya Satalkar, Bernice Simone Elger & David M. Shaw (2016). Defining Nano, Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine: Why Should It Matter? Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1255-1276.
    Nanotechnology, which involves manipulation of matter on a ‘nano’ scale, is considered to be a key enabling technology. Medical applications of nanotechnology are expected to significantly improve disease diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and subsequently reduce health care costs. However, there is no consensus on the definition of nanotechnology or nanomedicine, and this stems from the underlying debate on defining ‘nano’. This paper aims to present the diversity in the definition of nanomedicine and its impact on the translation of basic science (...)
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  14.  4
    Chitu Womehoma Princewill, Ayodele S. Jegede, Karin Nordström, Bolatito Lanre‐Abass & Bernice Simone Elger (2016). Factors Affecting Women's Autonomous Decision Making In Research Participation Amongst Yoruba Women Of Western Nigeria. Developing World Bioethics 16 (3).
    Research is a global enterprise requiring participation of both genders for generalizable knowledge; advancement of science and evidence based medical treatment. Participation of women in research is necessary to reduce the current bias that most empirical evidence is obtained from studies with men to inform health care and related policy interventions. Various factors are assumed to limit autonomy amongst the Yoruba women of western Nigeria. This paper seeks to explore the experience and understanding of autonomy by the Yoruba women in (...)
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  15.  19
    Katharina M. Ruhe, Domnita O. Badarau, Bernice S. Elger & Tenzin Wangmo (2014). End-of-Life Decision Making in Pediatrics: Literature Review on Children's and Adolescents’ Participation. Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (2):44-54.
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  16.  1
    Fabrice Jotterand, Antonio Amodio & Bernice S. Elger (2016). Patient Education as Empowerment and Self-Rebiasing. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (4):553-561.
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  17.  10
    David M. Shaw, Tenzin Wangmo & Bernice S. Elger (2014). Conducting Ethics Research in Prison: Why, Who, and What? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):275-278.
    Why devote an issue of an ethics journal to prison medicine? Why conduct ethics research in prisons in the first place? In this editorial, we explain why prison ethics research is vitally important and illustrate our argument by introducing and briefly discussing the fascinating papers in this special issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.Ethics is often regarded as a theoretical discipline. This is in large part due to ethics’ origin as a type of moral philosophy, which is frequently associated (...)
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  18.  1
    Katharina M. Ruhe, Eva De Clercq, Tenzin Wangmo & Bernice S. Elger (forthcoming). Relational Capacity: Broadening the Notion of Decision-Making Capacity in Paediatric Healthcare. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Problems arise when applying the current procedural conceptualization of decision-making capacity to paediatric healthcare: Its emphasis on content-neutrality and rational cognition as well as its implicit assumption that capacity is an ability that resides within a person jeopardizes children’s position in decision-making. The purpose of the paper is to challenge this dominant account of capacity and provide an alternative for how capacity should be understood in paediatric care. First, the influence of developmental psychologist Jean Piaget upon the notion of capacity (...)
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  19.  1
    Helena Hermann, Manuel Trachsel, Bernice S. Elger & Nikola Biller-Andorno (2016). Emotion and Value in the Evaluation of Medical Decision-Making Capacity: A Narrative Review of Arguments. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  20.  3
    M. L. S. Bette Anton, Vilhjálmur Árnason, Alister Browne, Lisa Eckenwiler, Bernice S. Elger, Veronique Fournier, Amnon Goldworth & Matti Häyry (2005). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Chair of the Advisory Com-Mittee for Conflicts of Interest, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:243-245.
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  21.  15
    Bernice S. Elger & Anne Spaulding (2010). Research on Prisoners – a Comparison Between the Iom Committee Recommendations (2006) and European Regulations. Bioethics 24 (1):1-13.
    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Ethical Considerations for Revisions to DHHS Regulations for Protection of Prisoners Involved in Research published its report in 2006. It was charged with developing an ethical framework for the conduct of research with prisoners and identifying the safeguards and conditions necessary to ensure that research with prisoners is conducted ethically. The recommendations contained in the IOM report differ from current European regulations in several ways, some being more restrictive and some less so. For (...)
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  22.  3
    Bernice S. Elger & Jean-Claude Chevrolet (1999). Beneficence Today, or Autonomy (Maybe) Tomorrow? Hastings Center Report 30 (1):18.
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  23.  9
    Ghislaine Issenhuth-Scharly, Manuella Epiney, Dominique Manaï & Bernice Simone Elger (2009). L'information et la gestion des risques dans le suivi de la grossesse lors du 1er trimestre : quelques réflexions sur le défi éthique et le cadre légal en Suisse☆. Médecine Et Droit 2009 (96):94-99.
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  24.  6
    Bernice S. Elger & Timothy W. Harding (2006). Should Children and Adolescents Be Tested for Huntington's Disease? Attitudes of Future Lawyers and Physicians in Switzerland. Bioethics 20 (3):158–167.
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  25. Bernice S. Elger (2009). M Any Common Diseases Are Believed to Result From Defects in Multiple Genes in Combination with Lifestyle. In Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.), The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company 403.
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  26. Bernice S. Elger (2008). Response to Douglas and Goold. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (3):271-273.
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