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Bernice S. Elger [11]Bernice Simone Elger [6]
  1. Solène Gouilhers Hertig, Samuele Cavalli, Claudine Burton-Jeangros & Bernice S. Elger (forthcoming). 'Doctor, What Would You Do in My Position?' Health Professionals and the Decision-Making Process in Pregnancy Monitoring. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100887.
    Objective Routine prenatal screening for Down syndrome challenges professional non-directiveness and patient autonomy in daily clinical practices. This paper aims to describe how professionals negotiate their role when a pregnant woman asks them to become involved in the decision-making process implied by screening. Methods Forty-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with gynaecologists–obstetricians (n=26) and midwives (n=15) in a large Swiss city. Results Three professional profiles were constructed along a continuum that defines the relative distance or proximity towards patients’ demands for professional (...)
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  2. Katharina M. Ruhe, Domnita O. Badarau, Bernice S. Elger & Tenzin Wangmo (forthcoming). End-of-Life Decision Making in Pediatrics: Literature Review on Children's and Adolescents' Participation. Ajob Empirical Bioethics:140113130502005.
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  3. Wiebke Bretschneider & Bernice Simone Elger (2014). Expert Perspectives on Western European Prison Health Services: Do Ageing Prisoners Receive Equivalent Care? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):319-332.
    Health care in prison and particularly the health care of older prisoners are increasingly important topics due to the growth of the ageing prisoner population. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the approaches used in the provision of equivalent health care to ageing prisoners and to confront the intuitive definition of equivalent care and the practical and ethical challenges that have been experienced by individuals working in this field. Forty interviews took place with experts working in (...)
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  4. Géraldine Ruiz, Tenzin Wangmo, Patrick Mutzenberg, Jessica Sinclair & Bernice Simone Elger (2014). Understanding Death in Custody: A Case for a Comprehensive Definition. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):387-398.
    Prisoners sometimes die in prison, either due to natural illness, violence, suicide, or a result of imprisonment. The purpose of this study is to understand deaths in custody using qualitative methodology and to argue for a comprehensive definition of death in custody that acknowledges deaths related to the prison environment. Interviews were conducted with 33 experts, who primarily work as lawyers or forensic doctors with national and/or international organisations. Responses were coded and analysed qualitatively. Defining deaths in custody according to (...)
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  5. David M. Shaw, Tenzin Wangmo & Bernice S. Elger (2014). Conducting Ethics Research in Prison: Why, Who, and What? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):275-278.
    Why devote an issue of an ethics journal to prison medicine? Why conduct ethics research in prisons in the first place? In this editorial, we explain why prison ethics research is vitally important and illustrate our argument by introducing and briefly discussing the fascinating papers in this special issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry (JBI).Ethics is often regarded as a theoretical discipline. This is in large part due to ethics’ origin as a type of moral philosophy, which is frequently (...)
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  6. Tenzin Wangmo, Violet Handtke & Bernice Simone Elger (2014). Disclosure of Past Crimes: An Analysis of Mental Health Professionals' Attitudes Towards Breaching Confidentiality. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):347-358.
    Ensuring confidentiality is the cornerstone of trust within the doctor–patient relationship. However, health care providers have an obligation to serve not only their patient’s interests but also those of potential victims and society, resulting in circumstances where confidentiality must be breached. This article describes the attitudes of mental health professionals (MHPs) when patients disclose past crimes unknown to the justice system. Twenty-four MHPs working in Swiss prisons were interviewed. They shared their experiences concerning confidentiality practices and attitudes towards breaching confidentiality (...)
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  7. Bernice S. Elger & Anne Spaulding (2010). Research on Prisoners – a Comparison Between the Iom Committee Recommendations (2006) and European Regulations. Bioethics 24 (1):1-13.
    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Ethical Considerations for Revisions to DHHS Regulations for Protection of Prisoners Involved in Research published its report in 2006. It was charged with developing an ethical framework for the conduct of research with prisoners and identifying the safeguards and conditions necessary to ensure that research with prisoners is conducted ethically. The recommendations contained in the IOM report differ from current European regulations in several ways, some being more restrictive and some less so. For (...)
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  8. Alexander Morgan Capron, Alexandre Mauron, Bernice Simone Elger, Andrea Boggio, Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra & Nikola Biller-Andorno (2009). Ethical Norms and the International Governance of Genetic Databases and Biobanks: Findings From an International Study. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):101-124.
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  9. Bernice S. Elger (2009). M Any Common Diseases Are Believed to Result From Defects in Multiple Genes in Combination with Lifestyle. In Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.), The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company. 403.
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  10. Ghislaine Issenhuth-Scharly, Manuella Epiney, Dominique Manaï & Bernice Simone Elger (2009). L'information et la gestion des risques dans le suivi de la grossesse lors du 1er trimestre : quelques réflexions sur le défi éthique et le cadre légal en Suisse☆. Médecine and Droit 2009 (96):94-99.
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  11. Bernice S. Elger (2008). Research Involving Prisoners: Consensus and Controversies in International and European Regulations. Bioethics 22 (4):224–238.
    This article examines international and European regulations on research involving prisoners for consensus, differences, and their consequences, and offers a critical evaluation of the various approaches. Agreement exists that prisoners are at risk of coercion, which might interfere with their ability to provide voluntary informed consent to research. Controversy exists about the magnitude of this risk and the consequences that should follow from this risk. Two strategies are proposed for a method of protecting prisoners that does not lead to discrimination: (...)
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  12. Bernice S. Elger (2008). Response to Douglas and Goold. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (3):271-273.
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  13. Bernice Simone Elger (2008). Medical Ethics in Correctional Healthcare: An International Comparison of Guidelines. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (3):234.
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  14. Bernice S. Elger & Timothy W. Harding (2006). Should Children and Adolescents Be Tested for Huntington's Disease? Attitudes of Future Lawyers and Physicians in Switzerland. Bioethics 20 (3):158–167.
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  15. M. L. S. Bette Anton, Vilhjálmur Árnason, Alister Browne, Lisa Eckenwiler, Bernice S. Elger, Veronique Fournier, Amnon Goldworth & Matti Häyry (2005). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Chair of the Advisory Com-Mittee for Conflicts of Interest, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:243-245.
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  16. Bernice S. Elger (2005). Attitudes of Future Lawyers and Psychologists to the Use of Genetic Testing for Criminal Behavior. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (03):329-345.
    Developments in the last several years have sparked renewed interest in the ethics of research involving humans. Issues relating to the global extent of research and its guiding principles are of particular importance to researchers, health officials, and individual ethics committees who want a deeper and more encompassing inquiry regarding the foundation and evolution of human research. This department of CQ launches a long overdue effort to explore these wider issues. Readers are invited to submit papers to Charles MacKay, 5011 (...)
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  17. Bernice S. Elger & Jean-Claude Chevrolet (1999). Beneficence Today, or Autonomy (Maybe) Tomorrow? Hastings Center Report 30 (1):18.
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