Search results for 'Biochemistry History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    David Bearman (2006). Survey of Sources for the History of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: An Introductory Report. Annals of Science 33 (4):395-397.
    (1976). Survey of sources for the history of biochemistry and molecular biology: an introductory report. Annals of Science: Vol. 33, No. 4, pp. 395-397.
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  2.  2
    W. H. Brock (1992). A Documentary History of Biochemistry 1770-1940, by Miku1ás Teich with the Late Dorothy M. Needham. History of Science 30:325-328.
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  3.  4
    Dorothy Needhani (1973). A History of Biochemistry by Marcel Florkin. History of Science 11:148-150.
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  4.  0
    Aaron Ihde (1974). A History Of Biochemistry By Marcel Florkin; Elmer H. Stotz. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 65:409-409.
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    Aaron Ihde (1971). The Chemistry of Life. Eight Lectures on the History of Biochemistry by Joseph Needham. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 62:250-251.
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  6.  0
    Robert Olby (1982). Archival Sources for the History of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: A Reference Guide and Report. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 15 (1):85-86.
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  7.  0
    Robert Olby (1971). The Chemistry of Life. Lectures on the History of Biochemistry. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 5 (3):303-304.
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  8.  1
    James W. Atz (1975). Ichthyology The Early Life History of Fish J. H. S. Blaxter Life Cycles of Fish: Physiology and Biochemistry G. E. Shul'man. [REVIEW] BioScience 25 (11):740-740.
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    John Parascandola (1975). History of Biochemistry Development of Biochemical Concepts From Ancient to Modern Times Henry M. Leicester. BioScience 25 (1):46-46.
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    M. J. Santesmases & E. Muñoz (1998). [The institutional construction of Spanish biochemistry, 1945-70: the role of exchanges with Northern Europe and America]. [REVIEW] Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 52 (1):33-49.
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  11.  6
    Eduard Glas (1979). Chemistry and Physiology in Their Historical and Philosophical Relations. Delft University Press.
    On the whole our study has made a plea for the combined research into the history, methodology and philosophy of science. There is an intricate communication between these aspects of science, philosophy being both a fruit of scientific developments and a higher-level frame of reference for discussion on the inevicable metaphysical issues in science.As such philosophy can be very useful to science, but should never impose its ideas on the conduct of scientists . ... Zie: Summary.
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  12. William Bechtel (2007). In Search of Mitochondrial Mechanisms: Interfield Excursions Between Cell Biology and Biochemistry. Journal of the History of Biology 40 (1):1 - 33.
    Developing models of biological mechanisms, such as those involved in respiration in cells, often requires collaborative effort drawing upon techniques developed and information generated in different disciplines. Biochemists in the early decades of the 20th century uncovered all but the most elusive chemical operations involved in cellular respiration, but were unable to align the reaction pathways with particular structures in the cell. During the period 1940-1965 cell biology was emerging as a new discipline and made distinctive contributions to understanding the (...)
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  13.  6
    Rivers Singleton (2000). From Bacteriology to Biochemistry: Albert Jan Kluyver and Chester Werkman at Iowa State. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):141 - 180.
    This essay explores connections between bacteriology and the disciplinary evolution of biochemistry in this country during the 1930s. Many features of intermediary metabolism, a central component of biochemistry, originated as attempts to answer fundamental bacteriological questions. Thus, many bacteriologists altered their research programs to answer these questions. In so doing they changed their disciplinary focus from bacteriology to biochemistry. Chester Hamlin Werkman's (1893-1962) Iowa State career illustrates the research perspective that many bacteriologists adopted. As a junior faculty (...)
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  14.  0
    John P. Swann (1989). Manuscript Resources in the History of Chemistry at the National Library of Medicine. Annals of Science 46 (3):249-262.
    This paper discusses the chemistry manuscript collection in an institution that does not readily come to mind when searching for unpublished matter on the history of chemistry, the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. This collection includes personal papers of some twentieth-century American chemists and biochemists, lecture notes of British and American chemistry courses of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries from a variety of institutional settings, and extended oral histories of some major figures in the history (...)
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  15.  0
    A. N. Creager (2012). Timescapes of Radioactive Tracers in Biochemistry and Ecology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):83-89.
  16.  25
    Roger Strand (1999). Towards a Useful Philosophy of Biochemistry: Sketches and Examples. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 1 (3):269-292.
    Scientific development influences philosophical thought, and vice versa. If philosophy is to be of any use to the production, evaluation or application of biochemical knowledge, biochemistry will have to explicate its needs. This paper concentrates on the need for a philosophical analysis of methodological challenges in biochemistry, above all the problematic relation between in vitro experiments and the desire for in vivo knowledge. This problem receives much attention within biochemistry, but the focus is on practical detail. It (...)
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  17.  10
    Claus Jacob (2002). Philosophy and Biochemistry: Research at the Interface Between Chemistry and Biology. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (2):97-125.
    This paper investigates the interface between philosophy and biochemistry. While it is problematic to justify the application of a particular philosophical model to biochemistry, it seems to be even more difficult to develop a special “Philosophy for Biochemistry”. Alternatively, philosophy can be used in biochemistry based on an alternative approach that involves an interdependent iteration process at a philosophical and (bio)chemical level (“Exeter Method”). This useful iteration method supplements more abstract approaches at the interface between philosophy (...)
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  18. Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (2010). An Epistemology of the Concrete: Twentieth-Century Histories of Life. Duke University Press.
    Ludwik Fleck, Edmund Husserl : on the historicity of scientific knowledge -- Gaston Bachelard : the concept of "phenomenotechnique" -- Georges Canguilhem : epistemological history -- Pisum : Carl Correns's experiments on Xenia, 1896-99 -- Eudorina : Max Hartmann's experiments on biological regulation in protozoa, 1914-21 -- Ephestia : Alfred Kähn's experimental design for a developmental physiological -- Genetics, 1924-45 -- Tobacco mosaic virus : virus research at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes for Biochemistry and Biology, 1937-45 -- The (...)
     
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  19.  3
    Miguel García-Sancho (2010). A New Insight Into Sanger's Development of Sequencing: From Proteins to DNA, 1943-1977. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):265 - 323.
    Fred Sanger, the inventor of the first protein, RNA and DNA sequencing methods, has traditionally been seen as a technical scientist, engaged in laboratory bench work and not interested at all in intellectual debates in biology. In his autobiography and commentaries by fellow researchers, he is portrayed as having a trajectory exclusively dependent on technological progress. The scarce historical scholarship on Sanger partially challenges these accounts by highlighting the importance of professional contacts, institutional and disciplinary moves in his career, spanning (...)
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  20.  53
    Angela N. H. Creager (1996). Wendell Stanley's Dream of a Free-Standing Biochemistry Department at the University of California, Berkeley. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (3):331 - 360.
    Scientists and historians have often presumed that the divide between biochemistry and molecular biology is fundamentally epistemological.100 The historiography of molecular biology as promulgated by Max Delbrück's phage disciples similarly emphasizes inherent differences between the archaic tradition of biochemistry and the approach of phage geneticists, the ur molecular biologists. A historical analysis of the development of both disciplines at Berkeley mitigates against accepting predestined differences, and underscores the similarities between the postwar development of biochemistry and the emergence (...)
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  21.  47
    Heather Douglas (2004). Prediction, Explanation, and Dioxin Biochemistry: Science in Public Policy. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 6 (1):49-63.
  22.  17
    Ute Deichmann (2007). “Molecular” Versus “Colloidal”: Controversies in Biology and Biochemistry, 1900–1940. Bulletin for the History of Chemistry 32 (2):105-118.
    OUTSTANDING PAPER AWARD, Division of the History of Chemistry, American Chemical Society.
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  23.  9
    Marsha L. Richmond (2007). Muriel Wheldale Onslow and Early Biochemical Genetics. Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):389 - 426.
    Muriel Wheldale, a distinguished graduate of Newnham College, Cambridge, was a member of William Bateson's school of genetics at Cambridge University from 1903. Her investigation of flower color inheritance in snapdragons (Antirrhinum), a topic of particular interest to botanists, contributed to establishing Mendelism as a powerful new tool in studying heredity. Her understanding of the genetics of pigment formation led her to do cutting-edge work in biochemistry, culminating in the publication of her landmark work, The Anthocyanin Pigments of Plants (...)
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  24.  2
    Tulley Long (2009). William McElroy, the McCollum—Pratt Institute, and the Transformation of Biology at Johns Hopkins, 1945–1960. Journal of the History of Biology 42 (4):765 - 809.
    In 1948, a dynamic junior member of the Johns Hopkins Biology Department, William McElroy, became the first director of the McCollum—Pratt Institute for the Investigation of Micronutrient Elements. The Institute was founded at the university to further studies into the practicalities of animal nutrition. Ultimately, however, the Institute reflected McElroy's vision that all biological problems, including nutrition, could be best investigated through basic biochemical and enzymes studies. The Institute quickly became a hub of biochemical research over the following decade, producing (...)
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  25.  2
    Jesú, Marí S. Santesmases & A. (2002). Enzymology at the Core: Primers and Templates in Severo Ochoa's Transition From Biochemistry to Molecular Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):193-218.
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  26.  0
    Paul Forman (1981). German-Jewish Pioneers in Science 1900-1933: Highlights in Atomic Physics, Chemistry and Biochemistry by David Nachmansohn. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 72:150-150.
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  27. Ton van Helvoort (2003). 'Purifying'Science: EC Slater and Postwar Biochemistry in the Netherlands. History of Science 41 (1):1-34.
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  28.  0
    Jesú, Marí S. Santesmases & A. (2002). Enzymology at the Core: Primers and Templates in Severo Ochoa's Transition From Biochemistry to Molecular Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):193-218.
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  29.  0
    Jesú, Marí S. Santesmases & A. (2002). Enzymology at the Core: Primers and Templates in Severo Ochoa's Transition From Biochemistry to Molecular Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):193-218.
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  30.  0
    Neil Morgan (1990). From Physiology to Biochemistry. In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge 494--501.
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  31.  0
    Ton van Helvoort (2003). Purifying'Science: EC Slater and Postwar Biochemistry in the Netherlands. History of Science 41 (1):1-34.
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  32.  0
    Stephen Wagner (1991). Molecules, Cells, and Life: An Annotated Bibliography of Manuscript Sources on Physiology, Biochemistry, and Biophysics, 1900-1960, in the Library of the American Philosophical Society by Lily E. Kay. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 82:613-613.
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  33.  8
    Doogab Yi (2008). Cancer, Viruses, and Mass Migration: Paul Berg's Venture Into Eukaryotic Biology and the Advent of Recombinant DNA Research and Technology, 1967-1980. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (4):589 - 636.
    The existing literature on the development of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering tends to focus on Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning technology and its commercialization starting in the mid-1970s. Historians of science, however, have pointedly noted that experimental procedures for making recombinant DNA molecules were initially developed by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg and his colleagues, Peter Lobban and A. Dale Kaiser in the early 1970s. This paper, recognizing the uneasy disjuncture between scientific authorship and legal invention (...)
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  34.  7
    Staffan Müller-Wille (2007). Hybrids, Pure Cultures, and Pure Lines: From Nineteenth-Century Biology to Twentieth-Century Genetics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (4):796-806.
    Prompted by recent recognitions of the omnipresence of horizontal gene transfer among microbial species and the associated emphasis on exchange, rather than isolation, as the driving force of evolution, this essay will reflect on hybridization as one of the central concerns of nineteenth-century biology. I will argue that an emphasis on horizontal exchange was already endorsed by ‘biology’ when it came into being around 1800 and was brought to full fruition with the emergence of genetics in 1900. The true revolution (...)
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  35.  10
    Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (2000). Ephestia: The Experimental Design of Alfred Kühn's Physiological Developmental Genetics. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):535 - 576.
    Much of the early history of developmental and physiological genetics in Germany remains to be written. Together with Carl Correns and Richard Goldschmidt, Alfred Kühn occupies a special place in this history. Trained as a zoologist in Freiburg im Breisgau, he set out to integrate physiology, development and genetics in a particular experimental system based on the flour moth Ephestia kühniella Zeller. This paper is meant to reconstruct the crucial steps in the experimental pathway that led Kühn (...)
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  36.  3
    Marcel Weber (2002). Theory Testing in Experimental Biology: The Chemiosmotic Mechanism of ATP Synthesis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (1):29-52.
    Historians of biology have argued that much of the dynamics of experimental disciplines such as genetics or molecular biology can be understood from studying experimental systems and model organisms alone . Such accounts contrast sharply with more traditional philosophies of science which viewed scientific research essentially as a process of inventing and testing theories. I present a case from the history of biochemistry which can be viewed from both the experimental systems perspective and from the methodology of theory (...)
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  37.  1
    Staffan Müller-Wille (2007). Hybrids, Pure Cultures, and Pure Lines: From Nineteenth-Century Biology to Twentieth-Century Genetics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (4):796-806.
    Prompted by recent recognitions of the omnipresence of horizontal gene transfer among microbial species and the associated emphasis on exchange, rather than isolation, as the driving force of evolution, this essay will reflect on hybridization as one of the central concerns of nineteenth-century biology. I will argue that an emphasis on horizontal exchange was already endorsed by ‘biology’ when it came into being around 1800 and was brought to full fruition with the emergence of genetics in 1900. The true revolution (...)
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  38.  7
    Garland E. Allen (1974). Opposition to the Mendelian-Chromosome Theory: The Physiological and Developmental Genetics of Richard Goldschmidt. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 7 (1):49 - 92.
    We may now ask the question: In what historical perspective should we place the work of Richard Goldschmidt? There is no doubt that in the period 1910–1950 Goldschmidt was an important and prolific figure in the history of biology in general, and of genetics in particular. His textbook on physiological genetics, published in 1938, was an amazing compendium of ideas put forward in the previous half-century about how genes influence physiology and development. His earlier studies on the genetic and (...)
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  39.  7
    Richard M. Burian (1996). "The Tools of the Discipline: Biochemists and Molecular Biologists": A Comment. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (3):451 - 462.
    This last result leads, rather naturally, to some concluding observations and a series of questions for further investigation. These case studies show that in all of the sites examined, the institutionalization of molecular biology as a “discipline” was primarily driven by the need to separate groups of practitioners with divergent but overlapping interests within the local context. Thus molecular biology was contingently separated from agricultural or medical biochemistry, virology, work on the physiology of nucleic acids, and so forth for (...)
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  40.  2
    Robert E. Kohler (1972). The Reception of Eduard Buchner's Discovery of Cell-Free Fermentation. Journal of the History of Biology 5 (2):327 - 353.
    What general conclusions can be drawn about the reception of zymase, its relation to the larger shift from a protoplasm to an enzyme theory of life, and its status as a social phenomenon?The most striking and to me unexpected pattern is the close correlation between attitude toward zymase and professional background. The disbelief of the fermentation technologists, Will, Delbrück, Wehmer, and even Stavenhagen, was as sharp and unanimous as the enthusiasm of the immunologists and enzymologists, Duclaux, Roux, Fernback, and Bertrand, (...)
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  41.  0
    Robert E. Kohler (1973). The Background to Otto Warburg's Conception of the "Atmungsferment". Journal of the History of Biology 6 (2):171 - 192.
    In the 1930s Warburg's spare prose and disciplined respect for the facts set the style for a new generation of biochemists who had not known the conceptual revolutions of earlier years. Led by Warburg, they rejected the excesses of the colloid school and the false starts of the teens and twenties. Talk of active structure virtually disappeared as chemists began to identify enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins, and hormones. In the gradual transformation of the Atmungsferment from an ironcolloid complex to a specific (...)
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  42. Hilary Putnam (1981). Reason, Truth, and History. Cambridge University Press.
    Hilary Putnam deals in this book with some of the most fundamental persistent problems in philosophy: the nature of truth, knowledge and rationality. His aim is to break down the fixed categories of thought which have always appeared to define and constrain the permissible solutions to these problems.
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  43. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2014). The Benefit to Philosophy of the Study of its History. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):1-24.
    This paper advances the view that the history of philosophy is both a kind of history and a kind of philosophy. Through a discussion of some examples from epistemology, metaphysics, and the historiography of philosophy, it explores the benefit to philosophy of a deep and broad engagement with its history. It comes to the conclusion that doing history of philosophy is a way to think outside the box of the current philosophical orthodoxies. Somewhat paradoxically, far from (...)
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  44.  60
    Immanuel Kant (2007). Anthropology, History, and Education. Cambridge University Press.
    Anthropology, History, and Education contains all of Kant's major writings on human nature. Some of these works, which were published over a thirty-nine year period between 1764 and 1803, have never before been translated into English. Kant's question 'What is the human being?' is approached indirectly in his famous works on metaphysics, epistemology, moral and legal philosophy, aesthetics and the philosophy of religion, but it is approached directly in his extensive but less well-known writings on physical and cultural anthropology, (...)
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  45.  10
    Francis Fukuyama (1992/2006). The End of History and the Last Man. Free Press ;.
    Ever since its first publication in 1992, The End of History and the Last Man has provoked controversy and debate. Francis Fukuyama's prescient analysis of religious fundamentalism, politics, scientific progress, ethical codes, and war is as essential for a world fighting fundamentalist terrorists as it was for the end of the Cold War. Now updated with a new afterword, The End of History and the Last Man is a modern classic.
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  46. Paul Redding (2013). The Necessity of History for Philosophy – Even Analytic Philosophy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):299-325.
    Analytic philosophers are often said to be indifferent or even hostile to the history of philosophy – that is, not to the idea of history of philosophy as such, but regarded as a species of the genus philosophy rather than the genus history. Here it is argued that such an attitude is actually inconsistent with approaches within the philosophies of mind that are typical within analytic philosophy. It is suggested that the common “argument rather than pedigree” claim (...)
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  47.  21
    Robert A. Wilson (2015). The Role of Oral History in Surviving a Eugenic Past. In Steven High (ed.), Beyond Testimony and Trauma: Oral History in the Aftermath of Mass Violence. 119-138.
    Despite the fact that the history of eugenics in Canada is necessarily part of the larger history of eugenics, there is a special role for oral history to play in the telling of this story, a role that promises to shift us from the muddled middle of the story. Not only has the testimony of eugenics survivors already played perhaps the most important role in revealing much about the practice of eugenics in Canada, but the willingness and (...)
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  48. Pauline Kleingeld (1999). Kant, History, and the Idea of Moral Development. History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (1):59-80.
    I examine the consistency of Kant's notion of moral progress as found in his philosophy of history. To many commentators, Kant's very idea of moral development has seemed inconsistent with basic tenets of his critical philosophy. This idea has seemed incompatible with his claims that the moral law is unconditionally and universally valid, that moral agency is noumenal and atemporal, and that all humans are equally free. Against these charges, I argue not only that Kant's notion of moral development (...)
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  49.  5
    Joeri Witteveen (forthcoming). Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History. Journal of the History of Biology.
    ‘Type’ in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93–119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. ‘Type’ was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber’s analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals an important dimension (...)
  50.  7
    Marianne Sommer (2008). History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473 - 528.
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the (...)
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