Search results for 'Biodiversity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christophe Malaterre (2013). Microbial Diversity and the “Lower-Limit” Problem of Biodiversity. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):219-239.score: 18.0
    Science is now studying biodiversity on a massive scale. These studies are occurring not just at the scale of larger plants and animals, but also at the scale of minute entities such as bacteria and viruses. This expansion has led to the development of a specific sub-field of “microbial diversity”. In this paper, I investigate how microbial diversity faces two of the classical issues encountered by the concept of “biodiversity”: the issues of defining the units of biodiversity (...)
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  2. James Maclaurin & Kim Sterelny (2008). What is Biodiversity? University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    What Is Biodiversity? is a theoretical and conceptual exploration of the biological world and how diversity is valued. Maclaurin and Sterelny explore not only the origins of the concept of biodiversity, but also how that concept has been shaped by ecology and more recently by conservation biology. They explain the different types of biodiversity important in evolutionary theory, developmental biology, ecology, morphology and taxonomy and conclude that biological heritage is rich in not just one biodiversity but (...)
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  3. Sahotra Sarkar (2005). Biodiversity and Environmental Philosophy: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book explores the epistemological and ethical issues at the foundations of environmental philosophy, emphasizing the conservation of biodiversity. Sahota Sarkar criticizes previous attempts to attribute intrinsic value to nature and defends an anthropocentric position on biodiversity conservation based on an untraditional concept of transformative value. Unlike other studies in the field of environmental philosophy, this book is as much concerned with epistemological issues as with environmental ethics. It covers a broad range of topics, including problems of explanation (...)
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  4. Valeria Negri (2005). Agro-Biodiversity Conservation in Europe: Ethical Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (1):3-25.score: 18.0
    While it is commonly acknowledged that the ecosystemic, and the inter- and intra-specific diversity of natural life is under threat of being irremediably lost, there is much less awareness that the diversity in agro-ecosystems is also under threat. This paper is focused on the biodiverse agro-ecosystems generated by landraces (LRs), i.e., farmer-developed populations of cultivated species that show among- and within-population diversity and are linked to traditional cultures. The aim of this work is to arouse concern about their loss, to (...)
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  5. Markku Oksanen & Juhani Pietarinen (eds.) (2004). Philosophy and Biodiversity. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This important collection focuses on the nature and importance of biodiversity. Many controversies currently surround biodiversity and a few of them are examined here: What is worthy of protection or restoration, and what is the acceptable level of costs? Is it permissible to kill sentient animals to promote native populations? Can species be reintroduced if they have disappeared a long time ago? How should the responsibilities for biodiversity be shared?
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  6. Ana Delgado (2008). Opening Up for Participation in Agro-Biodiversity Conservation: The Expert-Lay Interplay in a Brazilian Social Movement. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):559-577.score: 18.0
    In science and environmental studies, there is a general concern for the democratization of the expert-lay interplay. However, the democratization of expertise does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. If citizens do not take the sustainable choice, what should experts and decision makers do? Should the expert-lay interplay be dissolved? In thinking about how to shape the expert-lay interplay in a better way in agro-biodiversity conservation, I take the case of the MST (Movimento Sem Terra/Landless People’s Movement), possibly (...)
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  7. Joachim Boldt (2013). Do We Have A Moral Obligation to Synthesize Organisms to Increase Biodiversity? On Kinship, Awe, and the Value of Life's Diversity. Bioethics 27 (8):411-418.score: 18.0
    Synthetic biology can be understood as expanding the abilities and aspirations of genetic engineering. Nonetheless, whereas genetic engineering has been subject to criticism due to its endangering biodiversity, synthetic biology may actually appear to prove advantageous for biodiversity. After all, one might claim, synthesizing novel forms of life increases the numbers of species present in nature and thus ought to be ethically recommended. Two perspectives on how to spell out the conception of intrinsic value of biodiversity are (...)
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  8. S. K. Wertz (2005). Maize: The Native North American's Legacy of Cultural Diversity and Biodiversity. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (2):131-156.score: 18.0
    Recent research has focused on establishing the values of preserving biodiversity both in agriculture and in less managed ecosystems, and in showing the importance of the role of cultural diversity in preserving biodiversity in food production systems. A study of the philosophy embedded in cultural systems can reveal the importance of the technological information for preserving genetic biodiversity contained in such systems and can be used to support arguments for the protection/preservation of cultural diversity. For example, corn (...)
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  9. Johannes M. M. Engels, Hannes Dempewolf & Victoria Henson-Apollonio (2011). Ethical Considerations in Agro-Biodiversity Research, Collecting, and Use. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (2):107-126.score: 18.0
    Humans have always played a crucial role in the evolutionary dynamics of agricultural biodiversity and thus there is a strong relationship between these resources and human cultures. These agricultural resources have long been treated as a global public good, and constitute the livelihoods of millions of predominantly poor people. At the same time, agricultural biodiversity is under serious threat in many parts of the world despite extensive conservation efforts. Ethical considerations regarding the collecting, research, and use of agricultural (...)
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  10. Carlos Santana (forthcoming). Save the Planet: Eliminate Biodiversity. Biology and Philosophy:1-20.score: 18.0
    Recent work in the philosophy of biology has attempted to clarify and defend the use of the biodiversity concept in conservation science. I argue against these views, and give reasons to think that the biodiversity concept is a poor fit for the role we want it to play in conservation biology on both empirical and conceptual grounds. Against pluralists, who hold that biodiversity consists of distinct but correlated properties of natural systems, I argue that the supposed correlations (...)
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  11. Ramona L. Walls, Barry Smith & Others (2014). Semantics in Support of Biodiversity: An Introduction to the Biological Collections Ontology and Related Ontologies. PLoS ONE 10.score: 18.0
    The study of biodiversity spans many disciplines and includes data pertaining to species distributions and abundances, genetic sequences, trait measurements, and ecological niches, complemented by information on collection and measurement protocols. A review of the current landscape of metadata standards and ontologies in biodiversity science suggests that existing standards such as the Darwin Core terminology are inadequate for describing biodiversity data in a semantically meaningful and computationally useful way. Existing ontologies, such as the Gene Ontology and others (...)
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  12. Egon Noe, Niels Halberg & Jens Reddersen (2005). Indicators of Biodiversity and Conservational Wildlife Quality on Danish Organic Farms for Use in Farm Management: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Indicator Development and Testing. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (4):383-414.score: 18.0
    Organic farming is expected to contribute to conserving national biodiversity on farms, especially remnant, old, and undisturbed small biotopes, forests, and permanent grassland. This objective cannot rely on the legislation of organic farming solely, and to succeed, farmers need to understand the goals behind it. A set of indicators with the purpose of facilitating dialogues between expert and farmer on wildlife quality has been developed and tested on eight organic farms. “Weed cover in cereal fields,” was used as an (...)
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  13. Deis Elucy Siqueira (2013). Civilização do mangue: biodiversidade e populações tradicionais (Mangrove's Civilization: Biodiversity and traditional populations) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p509. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (30):509-544.score: 18.0
    O texto parte do reconhecimento da importância das populações tradicionais na conservação da biodiversidade, tanto em termos históricos quanto em projetos socioambientais baseados no paradigma da sustentabilidade. Foca a civilização do mangue do Salgado Paraense e, em particular, as comunidades da Reserva Extrativista de Caeté-Taperaçu (município de Bragança/PA). Destaca aspectos de sua territorialidade em articulação com sua religiosidade, na qual são tratados os santos e, sobretudo, os encantes (xamanismo caboclo). A partir desta religiosidade (crenças, superstições, lendas), a discussão se centraliza (...)
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  14. Leonardo Boff (2010). Biodiversidade, política e religião (Biodiversity, politics, religion) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n17p7. Horizonte 8 (17):7-10.score: 18.0
    Editorial - Dossiê: Biodiversidade, Política e Religião - (Dossier: Biodiversity, Politics and Religion) Biodiversidade, política e religião (Biodiversity, politics, religion) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n17p7.
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  15. Michael Jahi Chappell & Liliana A. LaValle (2011). Food Security and Biodiversity: Can We Have Both? An Agroecological Analysis. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):3-26.score: 18.0
    We present an extensive literature review exploring the relationships between food insecurity and rapid biodiversity loss, and the competing methods proposed to address each of these serious problems. Given a large and growing human population, the persistence of widespread malnutrition, and the direct and significant threats the expanding agricultural system poses to biodiversity, the goals of providing universal food security and protecting biodiversity seem incompatible. Examining the literature shows that the current agricultural system already provides sufficient food (...)
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  16. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1999). Agriculture and Biodiversity: Finding Our Place in This World. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (4):365-379.score: 18.0
    Agriculture has been recently viewed as the primary destructive force of biodiversity, but the places that produce our food and fiber may also hold the key to saving the richness of life on earth. This argument is based on three fundamental positions. First, it is argued that to value and thereby preserve and restore biodiversity we must begin by employing anthropocentric ethics. While changing our understanding of intrinsic values (i.e., the unconditional values of biodiversity as a state (...)
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  17. Pedro Assis Ribeiro de Oliveira (2013). Religião, Biodiversidade e Território (Religion, Biodiversity and Territory) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p439. Horizonte 11 (30):439-442.score: 18.0
    Editorial - Religião, Biodiversidade e Território. Dossiê: Religião, Biodiversidade e Território (Dossier: Religion, Biodiversity and Territory).
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  18. Pierre Mineau & Alison McLaughlin (1996). Conservation of Biodiversity Within Canadian Agricultural Landscapes: Integrating Habitat for Wildlife. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (2):93-113.score: 18.0
    Industrialized agriculture currently substitutes many of the ecological functions of soil micro-organisms, macroinvertebrates, wild plants, and vertebrate animals with high cost inputs of pesticides and fertilizers. Enhanced biological diversity potentially offers agricultural producers a means of reducing the cost of their production. Conservation of biodiversity in agricultural landscapes may be greatly enhanced by the adoption of certain crop management practices, such as reduced pesticide usage or measures to prevent soil erosion. Still, the vast monocultures comprising the crop area in (...)
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  19. Gesine Schütte (2003). Herbicide Resistance: Promises and Prospects of Biodiversity for European Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 20 (3):217-230.score: 18.0
    Diverse opinion papers related tothe question whether environmental benefits canbe achieved by the herbicide resistancetechnique have been published. But onlylong-term and large-scale field tests usingdifferent weed control methods and additionalagricultural vegetation surveys make itpossible to compare biodiversity effects ofdifferent strategies. A description of theamounts and frequencies of herbicideapplications, their direct and indirecteffects, and the impacts of farming practiceproves that the cropping history oftencompensates effects of an actual farmingpractice. The decline of beneficial plantspecies with all its negative side effects onbiodiversity (...)
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  20. Isidro Rimarachín Cabrera, Emma Zapata Martelo & Verónica Vázquez García (2001). Gender, Rural Households, and Biodiversity in Native Mexico. Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):85-93.score: 18.0
    Knowledge about maize varieties is the key to rural households' survival in native Mexico. Native peoples relate to nature in particular ways and they play a crucial role in maintaining biodiversity. This paper discusses the relationship between native women's accumulated knowledge on maize varieties and the laboratory analysis of the species that they manage. Fieldwork was conducted in an Otomí community, San Pablo Arriba, located in the state of Mexico.
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  21. M. R. Posa, A. C. Diesmos, N. S. Sodhi & T. M. Brooks (2008). Hope for Threatened Tropical Biodiversity: Lessons From the Philippines. Bioscience 58 (3):231-240.score: 18.0
    The Philippines is a megadiverse country, but it is also often seen as a country of ecological ruin whose biodiversity is on the verge of collapse. Decades of environmental neglect have pushed ecosystems to their limit, often with deadly repercussions for the human population. Is conservation in the Philippines a lost cause? We review current conservation efforts, in the Philippines, considering the actions of academics, field researchers, local communilies, nongovernmental organizations, tbe government, and other sectors of society. Remarkably, however (...)
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  22. Will R. Turner, Katrina Brandon, Thomas M. Brooks, Claude Gascon, Holly K. Gibbs, Keith S. Lawrence, Russell A. Mittermeier & Elizabeth R. Selig (2012). Global Biodiversity Conservation and the Alleviation of Poverty. Bioscience 62 (1):85-92.score: 18.0
    Poverty and biodiversity loss are two of the world’s dire challenges. Claims of conservation’s contribution to poverty alleviation, however, remain controversial. Here, we assess the flows of ecosystem services provided to people by priority habitats for terrestrial conservation, considering the global distributions of biodiversity, physical factors, and socioeconomic context. We estimate the value of these habitats to the poor, both through direct benefits and through payments for ecosystem services to those stewarding natural habitats. The global potential for (...) conservation to support poor communities is high: The top 25% of conservation priority areas could provide 56%–57% of benefits. The aggregate benefits are valued at three times the estimated opportunity costs and exceed $1 per person per day for 331 million of the world’s poorest people. Although trade-offs remain, these results show win–win synergies between conservation and poverty alleviation, indicate that effective financial mechanisms can enhance these synergies, and suggest biodiversity conservation as a fundamental component of sustainable economic development. (shrink)
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  23. T. Garrett Graddy (2013). Regarding Biocultural Heritage: In Situ Political Ecology of Agricultural Biodiversity in the Peruvian Andes. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):587-604.score: 18.0
    This paper emerges from and aims to contribute to conversations on agricultural biodiversity loss, value, and renewal. Standard international responses to the crisis of agrobiodiversity erosion focus mostly on ex situ preservation of germplasm, with little financial and strategic support for in situ cultivation. Yet, one agrarian collective in the Peruvian Andes—the Parque de la Papa (Parque)—has repatriated a thousand native potatoes from the gene bank in Lima so as to catalyze in situ regeneration of lost agricultural biodiversity (...)
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  24. David Takacs (1996). The Idea of Biodiversity: Philosophies of Paradise. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 18.0
    "At places distant from where you are, but also uncomfortably close," writes David Takacs, "a holocaust is under way. People are slashing, hacking, bulldozing, burning, poisoning, and otherwise destroying huge swaths of life on Earth at a furious pace." And a cadre of ecologists and conservation biologists has responded, vigorously promoting a new definition of nature: biodiversity--advocating it in Congress and on the Tonight Show; whispering it into the ears of foreign leaders redefining the boundaries of science and politics, (...)
     
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  25. Chris Hamilton (2006). Biodiversity, Biopiracy and Benefits: What Allegations of Biopiracy Tell Us About Intellectual Property. Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):158–173.score: 15.0
  26. Philip J. Cafaro, Richard B. Primack & Robert L. Zimdahl (2006). The Fat of the Land: Linking American Food Overconsumption, Obesity, and Biodiversity Loss. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):541-561.score: 15.0
    Americans’ excessive consumption of food harms their health and quality of life and also causes direct and indirect environmental degradation, through habitat loss and increased pollution from agricultural fertilizers and pesticides. We show here that reducing food consumption (and eating less meat) could improve Americans’ health and well-being while facilitating environmental benefits ranging from establishing new national parks and protected areas to allowing more earth-friendly farming and ranching techniques. We conclude by considering various public policy initiatives to lower per capita (...)
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  27. K. S. Shrader-Frechette & E. D. Mccoy (1994). Biodiversity, Biological Uncertainty, and Setting Conservation Priorities. Biology and Philosophy 9 (2):167-195.score: 15.0
    In a world of massive extinctions where not all taxa can be saved, how ought biologists to decide their preservation priorities? When biologists make recommendations regarding conservation, should their analyses be based on scientific criteria, on public or lay criteria, on economic or some other criteria? As a first step in answering this question, we examine the issue of whether biologists ought to try to save the endangered Florida panther, a well known glamour taxon. To evaluate the merits of panther (...)
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  28. Nicolae Morar, Ted Toadvine & Brendan Bohannan (forthcoming). Biodiversity at Twenty-Five Years: Revolution or Red Herring? Ethics, Policy, and Environment.score: 15.0
  29. Doris Schroeder & Carolina Lasén-díaz (2006). Sharing the Benefits of Genetic Resources: From Biodiversity to Human Genetics. Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):135–143.score: 15.0
  30. Michael Kopp (2010). Speciation and the Neutral Theory of Biodiversity. Bioessays 32 (7):564-570.score: 15.0
  31. Manuel Nogales, Eric Vidal, FÉLix M. Medina, Elsa Bonnaud, Bernie R. Tershy, Karl J. Campbell & Erika S. Zavaleta (2013). Feral Cats and Biodiversity Conservation. Bioscience 63 (10):804-810.score: 15.0
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  32. Eleanor J. Sterling, Andrés Gómez & Ana L. Porzecanski (2010). A Systemic View of Biodiversity and its Conservation: Processes, Interrelationships, and Human Culture. Bioessays 32 (12):1090-1098.score: 15.0
  33. Almaz Negash & Anke Niehof (2004). The Significance of Enset Culture and Biodiversity for Rural Household Food and Livelihood Security in Southwestern Ethiopia. Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):61-71.score: 15.0
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  34. Jay Odenbaugh, A Philosophy for Biodiversity?score: 12.0
    Sahotra Sarkar’s Biodiversity and Environmental Philosophy is a welcome addition to the fields of environmental philosophy and the philosophy of science. First, his book has a rigorous and careful discussion of why we should preserve biodiversity. This is all the more important since much of environmental ethics has rested on normative claims which are unclear in meaning, appear unjustified at best and unjustifiable at worst, and are politically ineffective. Second, Sarkar is at home in the science of conservation (...)
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  35. Sahotra Sarkar (2002). Defining “Biodiversity”; Assessing Biodiversity. The Monist 85 (1):131-155.score: 12.0
    This paper analyzes the concept of biodiversity in conservation biology and assesses potential methods for its measurement.
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  36. Kathryn Paxton George (1988). Biodiversity and Biotechnology. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (3):175-192.score: 12.0
    The maintenance of biodiversity is urged from many quarters and on grounds ranging from aesthetic considerations to its usefulness, particularly for biotechnology. But regardless of the grounds for preserving biodiversity, writers are generally in agreement that it should be preserved. But, in examining the various references biodiversity, such as species diversity, genetic diversity, and habitat diversity, it is apparent that we cannot aim to preserve biodiversityas such, since there are a number of conflicts in any such undertaking. (...)
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  37. Sahotra Sarkar (2006). Ecological Diversity and Biodiversity as Concepts for Conservation Planning: Comments on Ricotta. Acta Biotheoretica 54 (2).score: 12.0
    Ricotta argues against the existence of a unique measure of biodiversity by pointing out that no known measure of α-diversity satisfies all the adequacy conditions that have traditionally been set for it. While that technical claim is correct, it is not relevant in the context of defining biodiversity which is most usefully measured by β-diversity. The concept of complementarity provides a closely related family of measures of biodiversity which can be used for systematic conservation planning. Moreover, these (...)
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  38. Greg Mikkelson, Economic Inequality Predicts Biodiversity Loss.score: 12.0
    Human activity is causing high rates of biodiversity loss. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the extent to which socioeconomic factors exacerbate or ameliorate our impacts on biological diversity. One such factor, economic inequality, has been shown to affect public health, and has been linked to environmental problems in general. We tested how strongly economic inequality is related to biodiversity loss in particular. We found that among countries, and among US states, the number of species that are threatened (...)
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  39. Delali B. K. Dovie (2003). Detaining Livelihoods and Disputing Biodiversity: Whose Dilemma? Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (1):27 – 41.score: 12.0
    The decision-making process of conserving biodiversity within the confines of sustainable livelihoods and development is examined. It is one of the greatest dilemmas facing the conservation community because of the multifaceted nature of activities involved. The case of the conservation of coastal wetlands in Ghana (from 1993 to 1999) is utilised in developing a 'community conservation interface' (CCI) model for the active participation of local communities. The ethical basis of the model is to promote accountability, transparency and responsibility throughout (...)
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  40. Ayelet Shavit & James Griesemer (2009). There and Back Again, or the Problem of Locality in Biodiversity Surveys. Philosophy of Science 76 (3):273-294.score: 12.0
    We argue that ‘locality’, perhaps the most mundane term in ecology, holds a basic ambiguity: two concepts of space—nomothetic and idiographic—which are both necessary for a rigorous resurvey to “the same” locality in the field, are committed to different practices with no common measurement. A case study unfolds the failure of the standard assumption that an exogenous grid of longitude and latitude, as fine‐grained as one wishes, suffices for revisiting a species locality. We briefly suggest a scale‐dependent “resolution” for this (...)
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  41. Broder Breckling & Hauke Reuter (2004). Analysing Biodiversity: The Necessity of Interdisciplinary Trends in the Development of Ecological Theory. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):83-105.score: 12.0
    Technological advancement has an ambivalent character concerning the impact on biodiversity. It accounts for major detrimental environmental impacts and aggravates threads to biodiversity. On the other hand, from an application perspective of environmental science, there are technical advancements, which increase the potential of analysis, detection and monitoring of environmental changes and open a wider spectrum of sustainable use strategies.The concept of biodiversity emerged in the last two decades as a political issue to protect the structural and (...)
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  42. Gregory J. Morgan (2010). Evaluating Maclaurin and Sterelny's Conception of Biodiversity in Cases of Frequent, Promiscuous Lateral Gene Transfer. Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):603-621.score: 12.0
    The recent conception of biodiversity proposed by James Maclaurin and Sterelny was developed mostly with macrobiological life in mind. They suggest that we measure biodiversity by dividing life into natural units (typically species) and quantifying the differences among units using phenetic rather than phylogenetic measures of distance. They identify problems in implementing quantitative phylogenetic notions of difference for non-prokaryotic species. I suggest that if we focus on microbiological life forms that engage in frequent, promiscuous lateral gene transfer (LGT), (...)
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  43. Sahotra Sarkar & James Justus, The Principle of Complementarity in the Design of Reserve Networks to Conserve Biodiversity: A Preliminary History.score: 12.0
    Explicit, quantitative procedures for identifying biodiversity priority areas are replacing the often ad hoc procedures used in the past to design networks of reserves to conserve biodiversity. This change facilitates more informed choices by policy makers, and thereby makes possible greater satisfaction of conservation goals with increased efficiency. A key feature of these procedures is the use of the principle of complementarity, which ensures that areas chosen for inclusion in a reserve network complement those already selected. This paper (...)
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  44. Ronald Rousseau & Piet Van Hecke (1999). Measuring Biodiversity. Acta Biotheoretica 47 (1).score: 12.0
    ''Biodiversity'' is all to often used as a buzz-word, with no clearly defined meaning, let alone a strict procedure to measure it. This article proposes a logical procedure, based on a similar approach in socio-economics (to measure income inequality). Every element in our logical procedure is known. Bringing it all together as presented is new, as far as we know.
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  45. William Grove-Fanning (2010). Biodiversity Loss, the Motivational Gap, and the Failure of Conservation Education. Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):119-130.score: 12.0
    While the precipitous decline of biodiversity threatens life-sustaining processes and vast segments of the human population, concern about its loss remains extremely shallow. Nearly all motivational campaigns falsely assume that upon appreciating the relevant information, people will be sufficiently motivated to do something. But rational argumentation is doomed to fail, for there exists a motivational gap between a comprehension of the crisis and action taken based upon such knowledge. The origin of the gap lies neither in the quantity and (...)
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  46. Michael A. Mccarthy, Mark Colyvan & Brendan A. Wintle, The Biodiversity Bank Cannot Be a Lending Bank.score: 12.0
    “Offsetting” habitat destruction has widespread appeal as an instrument for balancing economic growth with biodiversity conservation. Requiring proponents to pay the nontrivial costs of habitat loss encourages sensitive planning approaches. Offsetting, biobanking, and biodiverse carbon sequestration schemes will play an important role in conserving biodiversity under increasing human pressures. However, untenable assumptions in existing schemes are undermining their benefits. Policies that allow habitat destruction to be offset by the protection of existing habitat are guaranteed to result in further (...)
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  47. Wayne Myers & G. P. Patil (2006). Biodiversity in the Age of Ecological Indicators. Acta Biotheoretica 54 (2).score: 12.0
    The multifarious nature of biodiversity is considered in relation to difficulties of definite determination and managerial mandates for monitoring. At a micro scale there is some convergence with the concept of community, but the linkage is largely lost in the spectra of temporal scope, spatial scales, successional seres, and taxonomic trajectories. Practicality points to selecting suitable suites of indicators as surrogates for particular purposes. Domains of partial ordering on multiple indicators constitute comparable collectives, whereas different domains require recognition of (...)
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  48. Helena Siipi (2007). Naturalness in Biodiversity Management. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:173-178.score: 12.0
    Decline of biodiversity—richness, variety and variability of living beings—is an issue of concern world wide. Nevertheless, not all biological diversity is valued by conservation biologists. Most of them reject an idea of creation of so called A-areas—i.e. maximally rich and diverse biotic areas which have been produced by methods like genetic engineering and species introduction. Reasons for this are considered. A-areas are artefacts: their existence has been intentionally brought about by intentionally modifying their properties in order to produce an (...)
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  49. R. Youatt (2008). Counting Species: Biopower and the Global Biodiversity Census. Environmental Values 17 (3):393 - 417.score: 12.0
    Biopolitical analyses of census-taking usually focus on human censuses and consider how human experience is shaped by the practice. Instead, this article looks at the proposed global biodiversity census, which aims to take inventory of every species on earth as a response to anthropogenic species extinction. I suggest that it is possible to extend and modify Foucault's concept of biopower to consider contemporary human-nonhuman interactions. Specifically, I argue that an ecologically-extended version of biopower offers a useful way to conceptualise (...)
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  50. Paul M. Wood (1997). Biodiversity as the Source of Biological Resources: A New Look at Biodiversity Values. Environmental Values 6 (3):251 - 268.score: 12.0
    The value of biodiversity is usually confused with the value of biological resources, both actual and potential. A sharp distinction between biological resources and biodiversity offers a clearer insight into the value of biodiversity itself and therefore the need to preserve it. Biodiversity can be defined abstractly as the differences among biological entities. Using this definition, biodiversity can be seen more appropriately as: (a) a necessary precondition for the long term maintenance of biological resources, and (...)
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