Search results for 'Bioethics Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mircea Leabu (2012). Christianity and Bioethics. Seeking Arguments for Stem Cell Research in Genesis. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):72-87.score: 144.0
    Many Christian scholars, if not all of them, consider Genesis to be foundational texts of the Bible and the spring for all the other doctrines of the Scripture. Therefore, I'm considering the attempt to search and find arguments for cell therapy ethical issues in the fundamental text of Genesis as a challenging and educative task. Moreover, this could be the first step in analyzing the relationships between Christian religions and bioethics, in terms of finding reasonable decisions for ethical challenges, (...)
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  2. David VanDrunen (2009). Bioethics and the Christian Life: A Guide to Making Difficult Decisions. Crossway Books.score: 126.0
    Introduction: The Christian confronts bioethics -- Foundations of bioethics -- Christianity and health care in a fallen world -- Theological doctrines -- Christian virtues -- The beginning of life -- Marriage, procreation, and contraception -- Assisted reproduction -- The human embryo -- The end of life -- Approaching death : dying as a way of life -- Suicide, euthanasia, and the distinction between killing and letting die -- Accepting and forgoing treatment.
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  3. Aaron Hinkley (2006). Christianity, the Culture Wars, and Bioethics: Current Debates and Controversies in the Christian Approach to Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 12 (3):229-235.score: 110.0
    (2006). Christianity, the Culture Wars, and Bioethics: Current Debates and Controversies in the Christian Approach to Bioethics. Christian Bioethics: Vol. 12, No. 3, pp. 229-235.
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  4. N. Capaldi (1999). What is Bioethics Without Christianity? Christian Bioethics 5 (3):246-262.score: 108.0
    The author uses the essays in this issue as a springboard for making three points. First, he argues that most, if not all, current institutional versions of Christianity have failed to provide a meaningful framework for the spiritual life. Second, he argues that there is no ethics other than Judeo-Christian ethics and that there can be no bioethics other than Judeo-Christian bioethics. Finally, he argues that the overriding issue we face is notwhether to address bioethical issues from (...)
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  5. Globalizing Western Bioethics (2011). Some Perils and Pitfalls of “Missionary Bioethics” and Ethics “Capacity Building” in the Developing World and “Eastern” World. In Catherine Myser (ed.), Bioethics Around the Globe. Oxford University Press.score: 100.0
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  6. Nigel M. S. Cameroden, Scott E. Daniels & Barbara White (eds.) (2000). Bioengagement: Making a Christian Difference Through Bioethics Today. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 96.0
     
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  7. Albert Truesdale (2000). God in the Laboratory: Equipping Christians to Deal with Issues in Bioethics. Beacon Hill Press of Kansas City.score: 96.0
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  8. G. Khushf (1995). Illness, the Problem of Evil, and the Analogical Structure of Healing: On the Difference Christianity Makes in Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 1 (1):102-120.score: 92.0
    A Christian bioethic needs to place the medical approach to sickness, suffering, and death within the context of redemption and the renewal of humanity in the image of God. This can be done by accounting for the way in which the disruptions of the human life-world that attend the illness experience manifest the structure of the problem of evil and point toward an answer that transcends the individual and the medical community. Further, the disease-oriented approach to medicine, when understood in (...)
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  9. Salvino Leone (2012). The Features of a “Mediterranean” Bioethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):431-436.score: 90.0
    Even if somebody considers inappropriate any geographic adjective for Bioethics, nevertheless we think that there are some specific features of “Mediterranean” Bioethics that could distinguish it from a “Northern-European and Northern-American” one. First of all we must consider that medical ethics was born and grew in Mediterranean area. First by the thought of great Greek philosophers as Aristotle (that analyse what ethics is), then by Hippocrates, the “father” of medical ethics. The ethical pattern of Aristotle was based on (...)
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  10. Brent Waters (2009). This Mortal Flesh: Incarnation and Bioethics. Brazos Press.score: 90.0
    Preface -- How brave a new world? : God, technology, and medicine -- A theological reflection on reproductive medicine -- Are our genes our fate? : genomics and Christian theology -- Persons, neighbors, and embryos : some ethical reflections on human cloning and stem cell research -- Extending human life : to what end? -- What is Christian about Christian bioethics? -- Revitalizing medicine : empowering natality vs. fearing mortality -- The future of the human species -- Creation, creatures, (...)
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  11. H. T. Engelhardt (1999). Can Philosophy Save Christianity? Are the Roots of the Foundations of Christian Bioethics Ecumenical? Reflections on the Nature of a Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 5 (3):203-212.score: 84.0
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  12. A. E. Hinkley (2009). The Infinite Without God: Modernity, Christianity, and Bioethics, Or Why Christianity Must Be Counter-Cultural in the Contemporary World. Christian Bioethics 15 (3):209-219.score: 84.0
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  13. N. Capaldi (2002). The New Age, Christianity, and Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 8 (3):283-294.score: 84.0
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  14. Ruth E. Groenhout (2009). Bioethics: A Reformed Look at Life and Death Choices. Faith Alive Christian Resources.score: 80.0
    Christians, health care, and basic moral reasoning -- When life ends -- Chronic illness, suffering, and Christian responses -- Organ donation and heroic medicine -- Scarce resources and Christian compassion -- Abortion -- Assisted reproduction and embryo selection -- Embryo research and cloning -- What happened to the neighbors? global health care -- The global challenge of HIV/AIDS -- Concluding thoughts.
     
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  15. G. Trotter (2005). Bioethics, Christian Charity and the View From No Place. Christian Bioethics 11 (3):317-331.score: 78.0
    This essay contrasts the notions of charity employed by Traditional Christianity and by liberal cosmopolitan bioethics, arguing that: (1) bioethics attempts to reconstruct the notion of charity in a manner that is caustic to the Traditional Christian moral vision, (2) Christians are, on the whole, more charitable than proponents of bioethics' reconstructed view (even given the standards of the latter), and (3) the theistically oriented conception of charity employed by Traditional Christianity cannot be expressed in (...)
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  16. John Frederic Kilner (ed.) (2011). Why the Church Needs Bioethics: A Guide to Wise Engagement with Life's Challenges. Zondervan.score: 78.0
     
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  17. B. A. Lustig (2011). At the Roots of Christian Bioethics: Critical Essays on the Thought of H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. Christian Bioethics 17 (3):315-327.score: 72.0
    H. Tristram Engelhardt has made profound contributions to both philosophical and religious bioethics, and his philosophical and religious works may be read in mutually illuminating ways. As a philosopher, Engelhardt has mustered a powerful critique of secular efforts to develop a shared substantive morality. As a religious scholar, Engelhardt has affirmed a Christian bioethics that does not emanate from human rationality but from the experience of God found in Orthodox Christianity. In this collection of essays, both defenders (...)
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  18. H. T. Engelhardt (2009). Christian Bioethics in a Western Europe After Christendom. Christian Bioethics 15 (1):86-100.score: 72.0
    Europe has taken on a new, post-Christian, if not a somewhat anti-Christian character. The tension between Western Europe's ever more secular present and its substantial Christian past lies at the heart of Western Europe's current struggle to articulate a coherent cultural and moral identity. The result is that Western European mainline churches are themselves in the midst of an identity crisis, thus compounding Western Europe's identity crisis. Christian bioethics in Europe exists against the backdrop of these profound cultural cross (...)
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  19. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2011). Christian Bioethics After Christendom: Living in a Secular Fundamentalist Polity and Culture. Christian Bioethics 17 (1):64-95.score: 72.0
    The contemporary societies of the West are characterized by a collision of radically incommensurable cultures, that of traditional Christianity and that of the robustly laicist cultures that took shape in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, drawing not only on the French Revolution and the Western European Enlightenment but also on deep roots in the synthesis of faith and reason that framed the thirteenth-century Western Christian Middle ages. This article explores the foundational contrast and conflict between traditional Christian bioethics (...)
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  20. Amir Muzur, Hans-Martin Sass & Fritz Jahr (eds.) (2012). Fritz Jahr and the Foundations of Global Bioethics: The Future of Integrative Bioethics. Lit.score: 72.0
    The book includes all 15 long forgotten articles on bioethics and ethics written by Jahr from 1927 to 1947 in English translation. (Series: Practical Ethics / Ethik in der Praxis - Studies / Studien - Vol. 37).
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  21. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2012). Rethinking the Christian Bioethics of Human Germ Line Genetic Engineering: A Postscript Against the Grain of Contemporary Distortions. Christian Bioethics 18 (2):219-230.score: 72.0
    Unlike (especially) the various Protestantisms, Orthodox Christianity recognizes no fundamentally different problems in the development and (future) application of human germ line genetic engineering (HGGE) than those raised by more traditional medicine. The particular challenges which frame the life of a traditional Christian arise not only in view of “groundbreaking” technological progress and its attendant increase in human power over nature, but permeate already his most simple daily routines. The diverse post-traditional Christianities have ceased confronting such liturgical–ascetical challenges. The (...)
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  22. H. Y. Vanderpool (1999). On the Content and Purview of Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 5 (3):220-231.score: 72.0
    The author argues that to explore what is distinctly Christian about Christian bioethics requires clarity about what is Christian. He distinguishes between the Christian (that which can be identified as authentically Christian), Christianity (the sum of that which is authentically Christian), and ecclesiastical traditions (the historic communities of faith and practice that are predicated upon both Christian and extra-Christian tradition) to critically assess what is to be declared Christian. In addition to exploring the role of New Testament scripture (...)
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  23. G. P. McKenny (1995). Whose Tradition? Which Enlightenment? What Content? Engelhardt, Hauerwas, Capaldi, and the Future of Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 1 (1):84-96.score: 72.0
    The development of a content-full Christian bioethics requires an analysis of the particular contents and traditions which different Christians bring to morality. For Hauerwas, the content of Christian ethics is the speech and practices of the community. For Engelhardt, only a content-full tradition, such as the Orthodox tradition, will be able to arrive at closure on the moral issues presented by the contemporary practice of medicine. Capaldi calls, in contrast, for a Kantian society of autonomous self-legislators whose responsible freedom (...)
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  24. Cristian Radu (2012). Religious Discourse and Postmodern Rationality in Bioethics. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):206-222.score: 72.0
    Review of Ștefan Iloaie, Cultura vieții. Aspecte morale în bioetică (Culture of life. Moral aspects in bioethics) (Cluj -Napoca: Editura Renașterea, 2009).
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  25. H. Tristram Engelhardt (1995). Towards a Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 1 (1):1-10.score: 72.0
    Rather than revealing itself as a single, unified, ecumenical faith, Christianity is sundered with Christians united neither in one communion nor in one baptism. Christian Bioethics seeks to examine the traditional content-full moral commitments which the Christian faiths bring to life, sexuality, suffering, illness and death within the contexts of medicine and health care. Seeking to understand the differences which separate the bioethics of Roman Catholics, Protestants, and the Orthodox, Christian Bioethics explores the manners in which (...)
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  26. Leabu Mircea (2012). Christianity and Bioethics. Seeking Arguments for Stem Cell Research in Genesis. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 31:72-87.score: 72.0
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  27. Lehel Balogh (2010). The Public Debate on the Religiosity of the Public Debate of Bioethics in the USA. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (23):3-12.score: 66.0
    Despite the fact that bioethics is, basically, an interdisciplinary scientific field, it is deeply intertwined with less objectivistic, yet important, threads of morality and religion. From the beginning, in the United States, the language of bioethics has been shaped by theologians and people who do not neglect the religious approaches of particular scientific issues. This paper examines the possibility of using religious and nonreligious terminologies in the bioethical discourse, paying close attention to the American bioethical debate. I shall (...)
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  28. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2008). Is Europe, Along with its Bioethics, Still Christian? Or Already Post-Christian? Reflections on Traditional and Post-Enlightenment Christianities and Their Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 14 (1):1-28.score: 60.0
    This introduction explores the relationship between Europe and its Christianities. It analyses different diagnostic and evaluative approaches to Europe's Christian or post-Christian identity. These are grouped around the concepts of diverse traditional, and, on the other hand, post-Enlightenment Christianities. While the first revolves around a liturgical and mystical account of the church, a Christ-centred humanism, an emphasis on man's future life, noetic theology and a foundationalist claim to universal truth, the second endorses a moralization of the “Christian message,” political implementation (...)
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  29. Romano Altobelli & Salvatore Privitera (eds.) (2006). La Casa Della Vita. San Paolo.score: 60.0
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  30. Mario Cascone (2004). Diakonìa Della Vita: Manuale di Bioetica. Università Della Santa Croce.score: 60.0
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  31. Juan María de Velasco & Enrique Sanz (eds.) (2011). Bioética y Humanismo Cristiano. Universidad de Deusto.score: 60.0
    Esta obra está organizada en tres partes, en las que se indaga la plausibilidad del discurso de la Bioética y Teológica. En la primera de ellas, se estudia el vínculo que existe entre esta disciplina científica, el mensaje evangélico y la tradición cristiana, punto de partida y origen de todo este entramado bioético que aspira a sal-vaguardar valores humanos fundamentales. En la segunda, se trata de la relación que debe regir entre esta rama de la Teología y el polifacético mundo (...)
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  32. Peter Augustine Lawler (2005). Stuck with Virtue: The American Individual and Our Biotechnological Future. Isi Books.score: 60.0
    Cloning, gene therapy, stem-cell harvesting—are we on the path to a Huxley-like Brave New World? Not really, argues political philosopher and Kass Commission member Peter Augustine Lawler in Stuck with Virtue: The American Individual and Our Biotechnological Future, even as he admits that we will likely become more obsessive and anxious and will be subjected to new forms of tyranny. Rather, he contends, human nature is such that the biotechnological world to come, despite the best efforts of its proponents, will (...)
     
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  33. Alarcos Martínez & Francisco José (2005). Bioética Global, Justicia y Teología Moral. Universidad Pontificia Comillas.score: 60.0
    La cuestión de la justicia global en el ámbito de la bioética no es una cuestión baladí, en ella nos jugamos la dignidad a escala planetaria y la dignidad de todos y cada uno de los seres humanos en particular. El paradigma para pensar el mundo ya no es la confrontación Este-Oeste, ni incluso Norte-Sur. Los problemas, con sus posibilidades y limitaciones en la forma de abordarlos, tienen dimensiones globales. Urge una rearticulación de los discursos parcelados y compartimentados pues, desde (...)
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  34. Enrique Molina & José Ramón Pardo (eds.) (2006). Sociedad Contemporánea y Cultura de la Vida: Presente y Futuro de la Bioética. Ediciones Universidad de Navarra, Eunsa.score: 60.0
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  35. Giannino Piana (2005). Etica, Scienza, Società: I Nodi Critici Emergenti. Cittadella.score: 60.0
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  36. Egbert Schroten & Theodoor Adriaan Boer (eds.) (2004). Schepper Naast God?: Theologie, Bio-Ethiek, En Pluralisme: Essays Aangeboden Aan Egbert Schroten. Koninklijke van Gorcum.score: 60.0
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  37. Scott B. Rae (1999). Bioethics: A Christian Approach in a Pluralistic Age. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 54.0
    This new series of books brings thoughtful, biblically informed perspectives to contemporary issues in bioethics.
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  38. Gilbert Meilaender (2005). Bioethics: A Primer for Christians. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 54.0
    This new edition of his "Bioethics features updated information throughout, a fuller discussion of human embryos -- including stem cell research -- and a ...
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  39. T. J. Bole (2000). The Person in Secular and in Orthodox-Catholic Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 6 (1):85-112.score: 54.0
    The following demarcates the sense of the human person in Orthodox-Catholic bioethics from the family of senses proper to secular bioethics and philosophy. The radically different sources of knowledge about the senses proper to each discipline suggest that the importation of philosophical and secular psychological distinctions and analyses into true Christianity's concern with the human person, is fundamentally misguided. This suggestion is confirmed by examination of the articles of Crosby, Glannon, Hoswepian, and Meador and Shuman.
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  40. H. T. Engelhardt (1996). Suffering, Meaning, and Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 2 (2):129-153.score: 54.0
    Suffering evokes moral and metaphysical reflection, the bioethics of suffering concerns the proper ethos of living with suffering. Because empirical and philosophical explorations of suffering are imprisoned in the world of immanent experience, they cannot reach to a transcendent meaning. Even if religious and other narratives concerning the meaning of suffering have no transcendent import, they can have aesthetic and moral significance. This understanding of narratives of suffering and of their custodians has substantial ecumenical implications: chaplains can function as (...)
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  41. A. Verhey (2005). What Makes Christian Bioethics Christian? Bible, Story, and Communal Discernment. Christian Bioethics 11 (3):297-315.score: 54.0
    Scripture is somehow normative for any bioethic that would be Christian. There are problems, however, both with Scripture and with those who read Scripture. Methodological reflection is necessary. Scripture must be read humbly and in Christian community. It must be read not as a timeless code but as the story of God and of our lives. That story moves from creation to a new creation. At the center of the Christian story are the stories of Jesus of Nazareth as healer, (...)
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  42. Nicholas Capaldi (2007). How Philosophy and Theology Have Undermined Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 13 (1):53-66.score: 54.0
    This essay begins by distinguishing among the viewpoints of philosophy, theology, and religion; it then explores how each deals with ‘sin’ in the bioethical context. The conclusions are that the philosophical and theological viewpoints are intellectually defective in that they cripple our ability to deal with normative issues, and are in the end unable to integrate Christian concepts like ‘sin’ successfully into bioethics. Sin is predicated only of beings with free will, though only in Western Christianity must all (...)
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  43. D. W. Amundsen & O. W. Mandahl (1995). Ecumenical in Spite of Ourselves: A Protestant Assessment of Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican Catholic Approaches to Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 1 (2):213-245.score: 54.0
    A Christian approach to the issues that constitute bioethics is inevitable for us who cherish the truth of historic, creedal, trinitarian Christianity. Scripture teaches and the Greek and Latin Church Fathers as well as the Reformers aver that man, created in the image of God, has an inherent, if vestigial, sense of right and wrong and a conscience however marred by the fall and by rebellion. We must believe that we share this most basic ecumenism with all humanity, (...)
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  44. N. Capaldi (1995). From the Profane to the Sacred: Why We Need to Retrieve Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 1 (1):65-83.score: 54.0
    Christianity has been crucial in the conceptualization and articulation of the moral framework of the Western tradition. The social sciences, including ethics, were modeled on physical science. However, the Enlightenment project inculcated a metaphysics and an epistemology that reduced the subject to an object and thus undermined the conditions of freedom, agency and an accessible cosmic order; all of which are essential to morality. Competing value claims were shunted into a political context for resolution, but the politicalized morality itself (...)
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  45. Dionisio M. Miranda (1994). Pagkamakabuhay: On the Side of Life: Prolegomena for Bioethics From a Filipino-Christian Perspective. Logos Publications.score: 54.0
     
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  46. H. T. Engelhardt (2009). Moral Pluralism, the Crisis of Secular Bioethics, and the Divisive Character of Christian Bioethics: Taking the Culture Wars Seriously. Christian Bioethics 15 (3):234-253.score: 52.0
    Moral pluralism is a reality. It is grounded, in part, in the intractable pluralism of secular morality and bioethics. There is a wide gulf that separates secular bioethics from Christian bioethics. Christian bioethics, unlike secular bioethics, understand that morality is about coming into a relationship with God. Orthodox Christian bioethics, moreover, understands that the impersonal set of moral principles and goals in secular morality gives a distorted account of the moral life. Therefore, Traditional Christian (...)
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  47. H. T. Engelhardt (2003). The Dechristianization of Christian Hospital Chaplaincy: Some Bioethics Reflections on Professionalization, Ecumenization, and Secularization. Christian Bioethics 9 (1):139-160.score: 50.0
    The traditional roles of Christian chaplains in aiding patients, physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators in repentance, right belief, right worship, and right conduct are challenged by the contemporary professionalization of chaplaincy guided by post-Christian norms located in a public space structured by three defining postulates: the non-divinity of Christ, robust ecumenism, and the irrelevance of God's existence. The norms of this emerging post-Christian profession of chaplaincy make interventions with patients, physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators in defense of specifically Christian bioethical (...)
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  48. H. T. Engelhardt (2005). What is Christian About Christian Bioethics? Metaphysical, Epistemological, and Moral Differences. Christian Bioethics 11 (3):241-253.score: 50.0
    (2005). What is Christian About Christian Bioethics? Metaphysical, Epistemological, and Moral Differences. Christian Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 241-253.
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  49. D. Solomon (2005). Christian Bioethics, Secular Bioethics, and the Claim to Cultural Authority. Christian Bioethics 11 (3):349-359.score: 50.0
    Though the papers in this volume for the most part address the question, “What is Christian about Christian Bioethics”, this paper addresses instead a closely related question, “How would a Christian approach to bioethics differ from the kind of secular academic bioethics that has emerged as such an important field in the contemporary university?” While it is generally assumed that a secular bioethics rooted in moral philosophy will be more culturally authoritative than an approach to (...) grounded in the contingent particularities of a religious tradition, I will give reasons for rejecting this assumption. By examining the history of the recent revival of academic bioethics as well as the state of the contemporary moral philosophy on which it is based I will suggest that secular bioethics suffers from many of the same liabilities as a carefully articulated Christian bioethics. At the end of the paper I will turn briefly to examine the question of how, in light of this discussion, a Christian bioethics might best be pursued. (shrink)
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  50. Christopher Tollefsen (2011). Mind the Gap: Charting the Distance Between Christian and Secular Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 17 (1):47-53.score: 50.0
    The gap between Christian and secular bioethics appears to be widening, and inevitably so. In this essay, I identify four areas in which the differences between Christian and secular bioethics are significant, and in light of which secular bioethics, by its inability to attend to key concerns of Christian thought, will inevitably continue to marginalize the latter. How Christian bioethicists should view this marginalization will be the subject of the final section of this paper.
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