Search results for 'Bioethics Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Globalizing Western Bioethics (2011). Some Perils and Pitfalls of “Missionary Bioethics” and Ethics “Capacity Building” in the Developing World and “Eastern” World. In Catherine Myser (ed.), Bioethics Around the Globe. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
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  2. Zbigniew Bańkowski & John H. Bryant (eds.) (1995). Poverty, Vulnerability, the Value of Human Life, and the Emergence of Bioethics: Highlights and Papers of the Xxviiith Cioms Conference, Ixtapa, Guerrero State, Mexico, 17-20 April 1994. [REVIEW] Cioms.score: 78.0
  3. Bernard G. Clarke, Kevin Andrews & Mary Stainsby (eds.) (1991). Bioethics: Challenges of the 1990s: Proceedings of the 1990 Annual Conference on Bioethics. St. Vincent's Bioethics Centre.score: 78.0
     
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  4. Bernard G. Clarke & Mary Stainsby (eds.) (1991). Ethics and Resource Allocation in Health Care: Proceeding of 1991 Annual Conference on Bioethics. St Vincent's Bioethics Centre.score: 78.0
     
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  5. C. J. Vas & E. J. De Souza (eds.) (1990). Issues in Biomedical Ethics: Proceedings of the Festival of Life International Congress. Macmillan India.score: 66.0
     
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  6. Zbigniew Bańkowski, J. Barzelatto & Alexander Morgan Capron (eds.) (1989). Ethics and Human Values in Family Planning: Conference Highlights, Papers, and Discussion: Xxii Cioms Conference, Bangkok, Thailand, 19-24 June 1988. [REVIEW] Cioms.score: 60.0
     
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  7. Daniel Callahan & G. R. Dunstan (eds.) (1988). Biomedical Ethics: An Anglo-American Dialogue. New York Academy of Sciences.score: 60.0
     
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  8. F. J. G. Ebling (ed.) (1969). Biology and Ethics. New York, Published for the Institute of Biology by Academic Press.score: 60.0
  9. Denis Noble, Jean Didier Vincent & György Ádám (eds.) (1997). The Ethics of Life. Unesco Pub..score: 60.0
     
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  10. Peter Steinfels & Carol Levine (eds.) (1976). Biomedical Ethics and the Shadow of Nazism: A Conference on the Proper Use of the Nazi Analogy in Ethical Debate, April 8, 1976. The Center.score: 60.0
     
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  11. Qiu Renzong President & BioethicsWorld Congress Of (2007). The 8th World Congress of Bioethics, Beijing, August 2006. A Just and Healthy Society. Bioethics 21 (8):ii–iii.score: 36.0
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  12. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2012). Medical Ethics in an Era of Bioethics: Resetting the Medical Profession's Compass. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):21-24.score: 34.0
    What it means to be a medical professional has been defined by medical ethicists throughout history and remains a contemporary concern addressed by this paper. A medical professional is generally considered to be one who makes a public promise to fulfill the ethical obligations expressed in the Hippocratic Code. This presentation summarizes the history of medical professionalism and refocuses attention on the interpersonal relationship of doctor and patient. This keynote address was delivered at the Founders of Bioethics International Congress (...)
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  13. Qiu Renzong (2007). The 8th World Congress of Bioethics, Beijing, August 2006. A Just and Healthy Society. Bioethics 21 (8):ii-iii.score: 34.0
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  14. Ruth Chadwick & Udo Schüklenk (2008). Attend the 9th World Congress of Bioethics! Bioethics 22 (4):ii–ii.score: 34.0
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  15. Ruth Chadwick & Udo Schüklenk (2006). Beijing is the Venue of the 2006 International Association of Bioethics World Congress. Bioethics 20 (3):iii–iii.score: 34.0
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  16. Jackie Leach Scully (2014). Introduction. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):1-2.score: 30.0
    This issue of IJFAB is based on papers from the Eighth International Congress of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (FAB), held in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in June 2012. The biennial congress is now solidly established as a key feature of the bioethics landscape, and is an important factor in the continuing growth of feminist bioethics. From the first gathering in San Francisco in 1996, FAB congresses have developed a reputation as lively, welcoming, challenging, and intellectually vibrant events (...)
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  17. Ruth Chadwick (2012). Rotterdam 2012: The Next World Congress of Bioethics. Bioethics 26 (3):ii-ii.score: 26.0
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  18. Paul Macneill & Bronaċ Ferran (2011). Art and Bioethics: Shifts in Understanding Across Genres. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):71-85.score: 26.0
    This paper describes and discusses overlapping interests and concerns of art and bioethics and suggests that bioethics would benefit from opening to contributions from the arts. There is a description of recent events in bioethics that have included art, and trends in art that relate to bioethics. The paper outlines art exhibits and performances within two major international bioethics congress programs alongside a discussion of the work of leading hybrid and bio artists who experiment with (...)
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  19. Li En-Chang (2008). Bioethics in China. Bioethics 22 (8):448-454.score: 26.0
    Historically, the preconditions for the emergence of bioethics in China. were political reforms and their applications. The Hanzhong Euthanasia Case and the publication of Qiu Ren-zong's academic work Bioethics played a significant role in the development of bioethics in China. Other contributory factors include the establishment of the Chinese Society of Medical Ethics/Chinese Medical Association (C.M.A), the publication of the Journal of Chinese Medical Ethics, and the teaching and education of bioethics in China. Major achievements of (...)
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  20. Jan L. Bernheim (1999). Special Issue: IV World Congress of the International Association of Bioethics-How to Get Serious Answers to the Serious Question:'How Have You Been?': Subjective Quality of Life (Qol) as An. Bioethics-Oxford 13 (3):272-287.score: 26.0
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  21. S. Horrobin (forthcoming). A Critical Survey of the Bioethical Components of the International Association of Biomedical Gerontology 10th Congress, September 2003. Bioethics.score: 26.0
     
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  22. Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone Zoboli (2003). 2nd International Conference in Nursing Research and 6th World Congress of Bioethics. Nursing Ethics 10 (3):334-335.score: 24.0
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  23. M. Brkljacic (2009). The Challenge of Cross Cultural Bioethics in the 21st Century: Bioethics in Nursing: A Satellite Meeting at the 9th World Congress of Bioethics, Rijeka, Croatia, 3--8 September, 2008. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 16 (3):368-372.score: 24.0
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  24. A. J. Davis (1999). 4th World Congress of Bioethics, Tokyo, 4-7 November 1998. Nursing Ethics 6 (1):82-83.score: 24.0
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  25. Jan-Ole Reichardt & Markus Rüther (2013). Thinking Ahead: Bioethics and the Future, the Future of Bioethics. Challenges, Changes, Concepts: 11th IAB World Congress of Bioethics, Rotterdam, 26.–29. Juni 2012, Organisiert Von: Inez de Beaufort (President of Congress), Angus Dawson, Hans van Delden, Søren Holm, Maartje Schermer Und Marcel Verweij (Tagungsbericht). [REVIEW] Ethik in der Medizin 25 (1):79-81.score: 24.0
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  26. Henk Rigter (1992). The Inaugural Congress of the International Association of Bioethics Will. Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (3).score: 24.0
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  27. Raymond E. Spier (1999). Reflections on the 4th World Congress of Bioethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (3):409-416.score: 24.0
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  28. Mrs Tineke Stegemar (1992). Inaugural Congress of the International Association of Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (365).score: 24.0
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  29. David Shoemaker (2010). Personal Identity and Bioethics: The State of the Art. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (4):249-257.score: 21.0
    In this introduction to the special issue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics on the topic of personal identity and bioethics, I provide a background for the topic and then discuss the contributions in the special issue by Eric Olson, Marya Schechtman, Tim Campbell and Jeff McMahan, James Delaney and David Hershenov, and David DeGrazia.
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  30. Ruth Macklin (2010). The Death of Bioethics (as We Once Knew It). Bioethics 24 (5):211-217.score: 21.0
    Fast forward 50 years into the future. A look back at what occurred in the field of bioethics since 2010 reveals that a conference in 2050 commemorated the death of bioethics. In a steady progression over the years, the field became increasingly fragmented and bureaucratized. Disagreement and dissension were rife, and this once flourishing, multidisciplinary field began to splinter in multiple ways. Prominent journals folded, one by one, and were replaced with specialized publications dealing with genethics, reproethics, nanoethics, (...)
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  31. Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper (2009). Appropriate Methodologies for Empirical Bioethics: It's All Relative. Bioethics 23 (4):249-258.score: 21.0
    In this article we distinguish between philosophical bioethics (PB), descriptive policy orientated bioethics (DPOB) and normative policy oriented bioethics (NPOB). We argue that finding an appropriate methodology for combining empirical data and moral theory depends on what the aims of the research endeavour are, and that, for the most part, this combination is only required for NPOB. After briefly discussing the debate around the is/ought problem, and suggesting that both sides of this debate are misunderstanding one another (...)
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  32. Albert Garth Thomas (2012). Continuing the Definition of Death Debate: The Report of the President's Council on Bioethics on Controversies in the Determination of Death. Bioethics 26 (2):101-107.score: 21.0
    The President's Council on Bioethics has recently released a report supportive of the continued use of brain death as a criterion for human death. The Council's conclusions were based on a conception of life that stressed external work as the fundamental marker of organismic life. With respect to human life, it is spontaneous respiration in particular that indicates an ability to interact with the external environment, and so indicates the presence of life. Conversely, irreversible apnoea marks an inability to (...)
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  33. Angus Dawson (2010). The Future of Bioethics: Three Dogmas and a Cup of Hemlock. Bioethics 24 (5):218-225.score: 21.0
    In this paper I argue that bioethics is in crisis and that it will not have a future unless it begins to embrace a more Socratic approach to its leading assumptions. The absence of a critical and sceptical spirit has resulted in little more than a dominant ideology. I focus on three key issues. First, that too often bioethics collapses into medical ethics. Second, that medical ethics itself is beset by a lack of self-reflection that I characterize here (...)
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  34. Thomas K. McElhinney & Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Institute on Human Values in Medicine: Its Role and Influence in the Conception and Evolution of Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):291-317.score: 21.0
    For ten years, 1971–1981, the Institute onHuman Values in Medicine (IHVM) played a keyrole in the development of Bioethics as afield. We have written this history andanalysis to bring to new generations ofBioethicists information about the developmentof their field within both the humanitiesdisciplines and the health professions. Thepioneers in medical humanities and ethics cametogether with medical professionals in thedecade of the 1960s. By the 1980s Bioethics wasa fully recognized discipline. We show the rolethat IHVM programs played in defining (...)
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  35. Laurence B. Mccullough (2011). Was Bioethics Founded on Historical and Conceptual Mistakes About Medical Paternalism? Bioethics 25 (2):66-74.score: 21.0
    Bioethics has a founding story in which medical paternalism, the interference with the autonomy of patients for their own clinical benefit, was an accepted ethical norm in the history of Western medical ethics and was widespread in clinical practice until bioethics changed the ethical norms and practice of medicine. In this paper I show that the founding story of bioethics misreads major texts in the history of Western medical ethics. I also show that a major source for (...)
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  36. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2010). An Undignified Bioethics: There is No Method in This Madness. Bioethics 26 (4):224-230.score: 21.0
    In a recent article, Alasdair Cochrane argues for the need to have an undignified bioethics. His is not, of course, a call to transform bioethics into an inelegant, pathetic discipline, or one failing to meet appropriate disciplinary standards. His is a call to simply eliminate the concept of human dignity from bioethical discourse. Here I argue that he fails to make his case. I first show that several of the flaws that Cochrane identifies are not flaws of the (...)
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  37. Susan Sherwin (2011). Looking Backwards, Looking Forward: Hopes for Bioethics' Next Twenty-Five Years. Bioethics 25 (2):75-82.score: 21.0
    I reflect on the past, present, and future of the field of bioethics. In so doing, I offer a very situated overview of where bioethics has been, where it now is, where it seems to be going, where I think we could do better, and where I dearly hope the field will be heading. I also propose three ways of re-orienting our theoretic tools to guide us in a new direction: (1) adopt an ethics of responsibility; (2) explore (...)
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  38. James Dwyer (2009). How to Connect Bioethics and Environmental Ethics: Health, Sustainability, and Justice. Bioethics 23 (9):497-502.score: 21.0
    In this paper, I explore one way to bring bioethics and environmental ethics closer together. I focus on a question at the interface of health, sustainability, and justice: How well does a society promote health with the use of no more than a just share of environmental capacity? To address this question, I propose and discuss a mode of assessment that combines a measurement of population health, an estimate of environmental sustainability, and an assumption about what constitutes a fair (...)
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  39. Mi-Kyung Kim (2009). Oversight Framework Over Oocyte Procurement for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Comparative Analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk Case Under South Korean Bioethics Law and U.S. Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):367-384.score: 21.0
    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang’s potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under governmental auspices (...)
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  40. Malcolm Parker (2013). Overstating Values: Medical Facts, Diverse Values, Bioethics and Values-Based Medicine. Bioethics 27 (2):97-104.score: 21.0
    Fulford has argued that (1) the medical concepts illness, disease and dysfunction are inescapably evaluative terms, (2) illness is conceptually prior to disease, and (3) a model conforming to (2) has greater explanatory power and practical utility than the conventional value-free medical model. This ‘reverse’ model employs Hare's distinction between description and evaluation, and the sliding relationship between descriptive and evaluative meaning. Fulford's derivative ‘Values Based Medicine’ (VBM) readjusts the imbalance between the predominance of facts over values in medicine. VBM (...)
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  41. Nathan Emmerich (2011). Literature, History and the Humanization of Bioethics. Bioethics 25 (2):112-118.score: 21.0
    This paper considers the disciplines of literature and history and the contributions each makes to the discourse of bioethics. In each case I note the pedagogic ends that can be enacted though the appropriate use of the each of these disciplines in the sphere of medical education, particularly in the medical ethics classroom.1 I then explore the contribution that both these disciplines and their respective methodologies can and do bring to the academic field of bioethics. I conclude with (...)
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  42. Jonathan Ives & Michael Dunn (2010). Who's Arguing? A Call for Reflexivity in Bioethics. Bioethics 24 (5):256-265.score: 21.0
    In this paper we set forth what we believe to be a relatively controversial argument, claiming that 'bioethics' needs to undergo a fundamental change in the way it is practised. This change, we argue, requires philosophical bioethicists to adopt reflexive practices when applying their analyses in public forums, acknowledging openly that bioethics is an embedded socio-cultural practice, shaped by the ever-changing intuitions of individual philosophers, which cannot be viewed as a detached intellectual endeavour. This said, we argue that (...)
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  43. Miran Epstein (2010). How Will the Economic Downturn Affect Academic Bioethics? Bioethics 24 (5):226-233.score: 21.0
    An educated guess about the future of academic bioethics can only be made on the basis of the historical conditions of its success. According to its official history, which attributes its success primarily to the service it has done for the patient, it should be safe at least as long as the patient still needs its service. Like many other academic disciplines, it might suffer under the present economic downturn. However, in the plausible assumption that its social role has (...)
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  44. Richard Twine (2007). Thinking Across Species—a Critical Bioethics Approach to Enhancement. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (6):509-523.score: 21.0
    Drawing upon a concept of ‘critical bioethics’ [7] this paper takes a species-broad approach to the social and ethical aspects of enhancement. Critical Bioethics aims to foreground interdisciplinarity, socio-political dimensions, as well as reflexivity to what becomes bioethical subject matter. This paper focuses upon the latter component and uses the example of animal enhancement as a way to think about both enhancement generally, and bioethics. It constructs several arguments for including animal enhancement as a part of enhancement (...)
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  45. Duncan Wilson (2013). What Can History Do for Bioethics? Bioethics 27 (4):215-223.score: 21.0
    This article details the relationship between history and bioethics. I argue that historians' reluctance to engage with bioethics rests on a misreading of the field as solely reducible to applied ethics, and overlooks previous enthusiasm for historical perspectives. I claim that seeing bioethics as its practitioners see it – as an interdisciplinary meeting ground – should encourage historians to collaborate in greater numbers. I conclude by outlining how bioethics might benefit from new histories of the field, (...)
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  46. Aasim I. Padela, Ahsan Arozullah & Ebrahim Moosa (2013). Brain Death in Islamic Ethico-Legal Deliberation: Challenges for Applied Islamic Bioethics. Bioethics 27 (3):132-139.score: 21.0
    Since the 1980s, Islamic scholars and medical experts have used the tools of Islamic law to formulate ethico-legal opinions on brain death. These assessments have varied in their determinations and remain controversial. Some juridical councils such as the Organization of Islamic Conferences' Islamic Fiqh Academy (OIC-IFA) equate brain death with cardiopulmonary death, while others such as the Islamic Organization of Medical Sciences (IOMS) analogize brain death to an intermediate state between life and death. Still other councils have repudiated the notion (...)
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  47. Barbara Prainsack & Alena Buyx (2012). Solidarity in Contemporary Bioethics – Towards a New Approach. Bioethics 26 (7):343-350.score: 21.0
    This paper, which is based on an extensive analysis of the literature, gives a brief overview of the main ways in which solidarity has been employed in bioethical writings in the last two decades. As the vagueness of the term has been one of the main targets of critique, we propose a new approach to defining solidarity, identifying it primarily as a practice enacted at the interpersonal, communal, and contractual/legal levels. Our three-tier model of solidarity can also help to explain (...)
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  48. Tomislav Bracanović (2012). From Integrative Bioethics to Pseudoscience. Developing World Bioethics 12 (3):148-156.score: 21.0
    Integrative bioethics is a brand of bioethics conceived and propagated by a group of Croatian philosophers and other scholars. This article discusses and shows that the approach encounters several serious difficulties. In criticizing certain standard views on bioethics and in presenting their own, the advocates of integrative bioethics fall into various conceptual confusions and inconsistencies. Although presented as a project that promises to deal with moral dilemmas created by modern science and technology, integrative bioethics does (...)
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  49. Howard Brody & Arlene Macdonald (2013). Religion and Bioethics: Toward an Expanded Understanding. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):133-145.score: 21.0
    Before asking what U.S. bioethics might learn from a more comprehensive and more nuanced understanding of Islamic religion, history, and culture, a prior question is, how should bioethics think about religion? Two sets of commonly held assumptions impede further progress and insight. The first involves what “religion” means and how one should study it. The second is a prominent philosophical view of the role of religion in a diverse, democratic society. To move beyond these assumptions, it helps to (...)
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  50. Jimoh Amzat & Giovanni Grandi (2011). Gender Context of Personalism in Bioethics. Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):136-145.score: 21.0
    Personalism is one of the philosophical perspectives which hold that the reality in person and the human person has the highest intrinsic value. This paper makes reference to Louis Janssens' eight criteria in adequate consideration of the human person but further argues that there is need to consider people as situated agents especially within gender relational perspectives. The paper identifies gender as an important social construction that shapes the consideration of the human persons within socio-spatial spheres. The main crux of (...)
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