Search results for 'Bioethics Decision making' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Decision Making (2012). S Hared Decision Making is Widely Accepted as an Ethical Imperative1–5 and as an Important Part of Reasoned Clinical Practice. 6 Major Texts in Decision Analysis, 7 Medical Ethics, 8 and Evidence-Based Medicine9 All Encourage Physicians to Include Patients in the Decision-Making Process. [REVIEW] In Stephen Holland (ed.), Arguing About Bioethics. Routledge. 346.score: 2550.0
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  2. Measuring Decision Making (2002). Emotion, Decision Making, and the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press.score: 1640.0
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  3. Thomas May (2002). Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 714.0
    Issues concerning patients' rights are at the center of bioethics, but the political basis for these rights has rarely been examined. In Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making , Thomas May offers a compelling analysis of how the political context of liberal constitutional democracy shapes the rights and obligations of both patients and health care professionals. May focuses on how a key feature of liberal society -- namely, an individual's (...)
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  4. Ruiping Fan (2011). The Confucian Bioethics of Surrogate Decision Making: Its Communitarian Roots. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (5):301-313.score: 705.0
    The family is the exemplar community of Chinese society. This essay explores how Chinese communitarian norms, expressed in thick commitments to the authority and autonomy of the family, are central to contemporary Chinese bioethics. In particular, it focuses on the issue of surrogate decision making to illustrate the Confucian family-grounded communitarian bioethics. The essay first describes the way in which the family, in Chinese bioethics, functions as a whole to provide consent for significant medical and (...)
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  5. Richard A. Wright (1991). Clinical Judgment and Bioethics: The Decision Making Link. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (1):71-91.score: 525.0
    The literature on bioethics is diverse and confusing in its treatment of appropriate components for decision making. As a result, the literature on teaching bioethics is also confusing, even contradictory, in presenting an ‘appropriate’ framework within which learners may come to understand the nature and process of bioethics. The article sets out five decision components which are seen as common to all decision making. These components are then shown to have a significant (...)
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  6. Joyce Beebe Thompson (1985/1992). Bioethical Decision Making for Nurses. University Press of America.score: 464.0
     
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  7. James Stacey Taylor (2005). A Review Of: “Thomas May. 2002.Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making”. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):92-93.score: 459.0
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  8. James Stacey Taylor (2005). A Review Of:“Thomas May. 2002. Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making” Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. 135 Pp. $42.00, Hardcover. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):92-93.score: 459.0
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  9. David J. Rothman (2003/2008). Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making. Aldinetransaction.score: 444.0
    Introduction: making the invisible visible -- The nobility of the material -- Research at war -- The guilded age of research -- The doctor as whistle-blower -- New rules for the laboratory -- Bedside ethics -- The doctor as stranger -- Life through death -- Commissioning ethics -- No one to trust -- New rules for the bedside -- Epilogue: The price of success.
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  10. Edmund L. Erde (1991). Decision Making Methodology in Bioethics: An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (4):1-4.score: 444.0
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  11. Edmund L. Erde (1994). Decision Making Methodology in Bioethics: An Introduction (Part II). Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (1):1-4.score: 444.0
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  12. Pam McGrath, Emma Phillips & Gillian Ray-Barruel (2011). Bioethics and Birth: Insights on Risk Decision-Making for an Elective Caesarean After a Prior Caesarean Delivery. Monash Bioethics Review 28 (3):22-1.score: 444.0
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  13. Marília Fernandes Wettstein, Lia Nunes Ferreira Alves & José Roberto Goldim (2011). Bioethics and Food Restrictions by Religious Motivations: Decision Making Processes in Health. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (1).score: 444.0
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  14. Subrata Chattopadhyay & Alfred Simon (2008). East Meets West: Cross-Cultural Perspective in End-of-Life Decision Making From Indian and German Viewpoints. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):165-174.score: 441.0
    Culture creates the context within which individuals experience life and comprehend moral meaning of illness, suffering and death. The ways the patient, family and the physician communicate and make decisions in the end-of-life care are profoundly influenced by culture. What is considered as right or wrong in the healthcare setting may depend on the socio-cultural context. The present article is intended to delve into the cross-cultural perspectives in ethical decision making in the end-of-life scenario. We attempt to address (...)
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  15. P. L. Schneider (2006). When Psychiatry and Bioethics Disagree About Patient Decision Making Capacity (DMC). Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):90-93.score: 435.0
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  16. Karen L. Rich (forthcoming). Introduction to Bioethics and Ethical Decision Making. Nursing Ethics: Across the Curriculum and Into Practice.score: 435.0
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  17. L. Syd M. Johnson (2013). Stable Value Sets, Psychological Well-Being, and the Disability Paradox: Ramifications for Assessing Decision Making Capacity. AJOB Neuroscience 4 (4):24-25.score: 426.0
    The phenomenon whereby severely disabled persons self-report a higher than expected level of subjective well-being is called the “disability paradox.” One explanation for the paradox among brain injury survivors is “response shift,” an adjustment of one’s values, expectations, and perspective in the aftermath of a life-altering, disabling injury. The high level of subjective well-being appears paradoxical when viewed from the perspective of the non-disabled, who presume that those with severe disabilities experience a quality of life so poor that it might (...)
     
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  18. E. Grab-Schmidt (2005). Freedom in Responsibility: On the Relevance of “Sin” As a Hermeneutic Guiding Principle in Bioethical Decision Making. Christian Bioethics 11 (2):147-165.score: 387.0
    (2005). Freedom in Responsibility: On the Relevance of “Sin” As a Hermeneutic Guiding Principle in Bioethical Decision Making. Christian Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 147-165.
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  19. Sara T. Fry (2008). Ethics in Nursing Practice: A Guide to Ethical Decision Making. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 381.0
    Every day nurses are required to make ethical decisions in the course of caring for their patients. Ethics in Nursing Practice provides the background necessary to understand ethical decision making and its implications for patient care. The authors focus on the individual nurse’s responsibilities, as well as considering the wider issues affecting patients, colleagues and society as a whole. This third edition is fully updated, and takes into account recent changes in ICN position statements, WHO documents, as well (...)
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  20. M. Strätling, V. E. Scharf & P. Schmucker (2004). Mental Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making Towards the End of Life. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):209-215.score: 381.0
    German legislation demands that decisions about the treatment of mentally incompetent patients require an ‘informed consent’. If this was not given by the patient him-/herself before he/she became incompetent, it has to be sought by the physician from a guardian, who has to be formally legitimized before. Additionally this surrogate has to seek the permission of a Court of Guardianship (Vormundschaftsgericht), if he/she intends to consent to interventions, which pose significant risks to the health or the life of the person (...)
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  21. F. Torralba & C. Palazzi (2010). Decision-Making in Organisations, According to the Aristotelian Model. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):109.score: 381.0
    One field in ethics that has been developed during recent decades is virtue ethics, represented most importantly by Alasdair MacIntyre's work After Virtue. Virtue ethics is not opposed to principle-based ethics, but rather complements its task and develops it more fully. In the field of US bioethics, this option has proved to be even more fruitful, especially in the work of Edmund Pellegrino and David Thomasma. Virtue ethics is also being reappraised in relation to the ethics of organisations and (...)
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  22. M. J. Cherry (2010). Parental Authority and Pediatric Bioethical Decision Making. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):553-572.score: 377.0
    In this paper, I offer a view beyond that which would narrowly reduce the role of parents in medical decision making to acting as custodians of the best interests of children and toward an account of family authority and family autonomy. As a fundamental social unit, the good of the family is usually appreciated, at least in part, in terms of its ability successfully to instantiate its core moral and cultural understandings as well as to pass on such (...)
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  23. Pascal Borry, Paul Schotsmans & Kris Dierickx (2004). What is the Role of Empirical Research in Bioethical Reflection and Decision-Making? An Ethical Analysis. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (1):41-53.score: 372.0
    The field of bioethics is increasingly coming into contact with empirical research findings. In this article, we ask what role empirical research can play in the process of ethical clarification and decision-making. Ethical reflection almost always proceeds in three steps: the description of the moral question,the assessment of the moral question and the evaluation of the decision-making. Empirical research can contribute to each step of this process. In the description of the moral object, first of (...)
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  24. Gilberto de Jesús Betancourt Betancourt (2014). Limits of the therapeutic effort and bioethical principles in decision making. Humanidades Médicas 14 (2):407-422.score: 372.0
    Se realiza un estudio de los principios básicos o tradicionales de la bioética y su influencia en la práctica de la limitación del esfuerzo terapéutico en las Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos, como condicionante que favorece su aplicación en los pacientes en estado terminal. Se aborda la necesidad de una bioética no importada de otros países, que se corresponda a las características de la realidad latinoamericana y a cada contexto sociocultural. El trabajo tiene como objetivo fundamental resaltar la importancia de estos (...)
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  25. Roy Gilbar & Ora Gilbar (2009). The Medical Decision-Making Process and the Family: The Case of Breast Cancer Patients and Their Husbands. Bioethics 23 (3):183-192.score: 360.0
    Objectives: The objectives of the study were (1) to assess similarities and differences between breast cancer patients and their husbands in terms of doctor-patient/spouse relationships and shared decision making; and (2) to investigate the association between breast cancer patients and husbands in terms of preference of type of doctor, doctor-patient relationship, and shared decision making regarding medical treatment. Method: Fifty-seven women with breast cancer, and their husbands, completed questionnaires measuring doctor-patient/spouse relationships (paternalism, autonomy), and decision (...)
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  26. Jodi Halpern (2012). When Concretized Emotion-Belief Complexes Derail Decision-Making Capacity. Bioethics 26 (2):108-116.score: 360.0
    There is an important gap in philosophical, clinical and bioethical conceptions of decision-making capacity. These fields recognize that when traumatic life circumstances occur, people not only feel afraid and demoralized, but may develop catastrophic thinking and other beliefs that can lead to poor judgment. Yet there has been no articulation of the ways in which such beliefs may actually derail decision-making capacity. In particular, certain emotionally grounded beliefs are systematically unresponsive to evidence, and this can block (...)
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  27. Stella Reiter-Theil (2004). Does Empirical Research Make Bioethics More Relevant? “The Embedded Researcher” as a Methodological Approach. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (1):17-29.score: 357.0
    What is the status of empirical contributions to bioethics, especially to clinical bioethics? Where is the empirical approach discussed in bioethics related to the ongoing debate about principlism versus casuistry? Can we consider an integrative model of research in medical ethics and which empirical methodology could then be valuable, the quantitative or the qualitative? These issues will be addressed in the first, theoretical part of the paper. The concept of the “embedded researcher” presented in this article was (...)
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  28. Kristine Bærøe (2010). Patient Autonomy, Assessment of Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making: A Call for Reasonableness in Deciding for Others. Bioethics 24 (2):87-95.score: 345.0
    In this paper, I address some of the shortcomings of established clinical ethics centring on personal autonomy and consent and what I label the Doctrine of Respecting Personal Autonomy in Healthcare. I discuss two implications of this doctrine: 1) the practice for treating patients who are considered to have borderline decision-making competence and 2) the practice of surrogate decision-making in general. I argue that none of these practices are currently aligned with respectful treatment of vulnerable individuals. (...)
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  29. Lars Sandman & Christian Munthe (2009). Shared Decision-Making and Patient Autonomy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (4):289-310.score: 345.0
    In patient-centred care, shared decision-making is advocated as the preferred form of medical decision-making. Shared decision-making is supported with reference to patient autonomy without abandoning the patient or giving up the possibility of influencing how the patient is benefited. It is, however, not transparent how shared decision-making is related to autonomy and, in effect, what support autonomy can give shared decision-making. In the article, different forms of shared decision-making (...)
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  30. Mats Johansson & Linus Broström (2011). Counterfactual Reasoning in Surrogate Decision Making – Another Look. Bioethics 25 (5):244-249.score: 345.0
    Incompetent patients need to have someone else make decisions on their behalf. According to the Substituted Judgment Standard the surrogate decision maker ought to make the decision that the patient would have made, had he or she been competent. Objections have been raised against this traditional construal of the standard on the grounds that it involves flawed counterfactual reasoning, and amendments have been suggested within the framework of possible worlds semantics. The paper shows that while this approach may (...)
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  31. Eike-Henner W. Kluge (2009). Quality-of-Life Considerations in Substitute Decision-Making for Severely Disabled Neonates: The Problem of Developing Awareness. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):351-366.score: 345.0
    Substitute decision-makers for severely disabled neonates who can be kept alive but who will require constant medical interventions and will die at the latest in their teens are faced with a difficult decision when trying to decide whether to keep the infant alive. By and large, the primary focus of their decision-making centers on what is in the best interests of the newborn. The best-interests criterion, in turn, is importantly conditioned by quality-of-life considerations. However, the concept (...)
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  32. Peter H. Schwartz (2009). Disclosure and Rationality: Comparative Risk Information and Decision-Making About Prevention. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (3):199-213.score: 345.0
    With the growing focus on prevention in medicine, studies of how to describe risk have become increasing important. Recently, some researchers have argued against giving patients “comparative risk information,” such as data about whether their baseline risk of developing a particular disease is above or below average. The concern is that giving patients this information will interfere with their consideration of more relevant data, such as the specific chance of getting the disease (the “personal risk”), the risk reduction the treatment (...)
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  33. Pauline E. Osamor & Nancy Kass (2012). Decision-Making and Motivation to Participate in Biomedical Research in Southwest Nigeria. Developing World Bioethics 12 (2):87-95.score: 345.0
    Motivations and decision-making styles that influence participation in biomedical research vary across study types, cultures, and countries. While there is a small amount of literature on informed consent in non-western cultures, few studies have examined how participants make the decision to join research. This study was designed to identify the factors motivating people to participate in biomedical research in a traditional Nigerian community, assess the degree to which participants involve others in the decision-making process, and (...)
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  34. Robyn S. Shapiro (1999). In Re Edna MF: Case Law Confusion in Surrogate Decision Making. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (1):45-54.score: 345.0
    I review the recent case of Edna Folz, a 73 year-old woman who was suffering through the end stages of very advanced Alzheimer's dementia when her case was adjudicated by the Wisconsin Supreme Court. I consider this case as an example of how courts are increasingly misinterpreting the ethical and legal decision-making standards known as substituted judgment and best interests and thereby threatening individuals' treatment decision-making rights as developed by other courts over the past two decades (...)
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  35. Mary Terrell White (1998). Decision-Making Through Dialogue: Reconfiguring Autonomy in Genetic Counseling. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):5-19.score: 345.0
    Nondirective genetic counseling developed as a means of promoting informed and independent decision-making. To the extent that it minimizes risks of coercion, this counseling approach effectively respects client autonomy. However, it also permits clients to make partially informed, poorly reasoned or ethically questionable choices, and denies counselors a means of demonstrating accountability for the use of their services. These practical and ethical tensions result from an excessive focus on noncoercion while neglecting the contribution of adequate information and deliberative (...)
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  36. Katherine Hall (2002). Medical Decision-Making: An Argument for Narrative and Metaphor. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):55-73.score: 345.0
    This study examines the processes ofdecision-making used by intensive care(critical care) specialists. Ninety-ninespecialists completed a questionnaire involvingthree clinical cases, using a novel methodologyinvestigating the role of uncertainty andtemporal-related factors, and exploring a rangeof ethical issues. Validation and triangulationof the results was done via a comparison studywith a medically lay, but highly informed groupof 37 law students. For both study groups,constructing reasons for a decision was largelyan interpretative and imaginative exercise thatwent beyond the data (as presented), commonlyresulting in different (...)
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  37. Michel Silberfeld & David Checkland (1999). Faulty Judgment, Expert Opinion, and Decision-Making Capacity. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (4):377-393.score: 345.0
    An assessment of decision-making capacity is the accepted procedure for determining when a person is not competent. An inferential gap exists between the criteria for capacity specific abilities and the legal requirements to understand relevant information and appreciate the consequences of a decision. This gap extends to causal influences on a person'scapacity to decide. Using a published case of depression, we illustrate that assessors' uses of diagnostic information is frequently not up to the task of bridging this (...)
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  38. D. Micah Hester (2010). End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective. Cambridge University Press.score: 333.7
    Crito revisited -- Blindness, narrative, and meaning : moral living -- Radical experience and tragic duty : moral dying -- Needing assistance to die well : PAS and beyond -- Experiencing lost voices : dying without capacity -- Dying young : what interests do children have? -- Caring for patients : cure, palliation, comfort, and aid in the process of dying.
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  39. Joseph DeMarco, Douglas Powell & Douglas Stewart (2011). Best Interest of the Child: Surrogate Decision Making and the Economics of Externalities. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):289-298.score: 327.0
    The case of Twin B involves the decision to send a newborn to a less intensive Level 2 special care nursery (SCN) than to the Level 3 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) that is considered optimal by the physician. The physician’s acceptance of the transfer is against the child’s best interest and is due to parental convenience. In analyzing the case, we reject the best interest standard. Our rejection is partly supported by the views of Douglas Diekema, John Hardwig, (...)
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  40. Joseph Kaufert & Thomas Koch (2003). Disability or End-of-Life? Competing Narratives in Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (6):459-469.score: 315.0
    Bioethics, and indeed much ethicalwriting generally, makes its point throughnarratives. The religious parable no less thanthe medical teaching case uses a simple storyto describe appropriate action or theapplication of a critical principle. Whilepowerful, the telling story has limits. In thispaper the authors describe a simple teachingcase on ``end-of-life'' decision making that wasill received by its audience. The authors ill-receivedexample, involving the disconnection ofventilation in a patient with ALS (Lou Gherig'sDisease) was critiqued by audience members withlong-term experience as (...)
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  41. Douglas O. Stewart & Joseph P. DeMarco (2005). An Economic Theory of Patient Decision-Making. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (3):153-164.score: 306.0
    Patient autonomy, as exercised in the informed consent process, is a central concern in bioethics. The typical bioethicist's analysis of autonomy centers on decisional capacity—finding the line between autonomy and its absence. This approach leaves unexplored the structure of reasoning behind patient treatment decisions. To counter that approach, we present a microeconomic theory of patient decision-making regarding the acceptable level of medical treatment from the patient's perspective. We show that a rational patient's desired treatment level typically departs (...)
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  42. Alexander A. Kon (2011). Life and Death Choices in Neonatal Care: Applying Shared Decision-Making Focused on Parental Values. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):35 - 36.score: 306.0
    (2011). Life and Death Choices in Neonatal Care: Applying Shared Decision-Making Focused on Parental Values. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 35-36.
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  43. Abraham Rudnick (2007). Processes and Pitfalls of Dialogical Bioethics. Health Care Analysis 15 (2):123-135.score: 306.0
    Bioethics uses various theories, methods and institutions for its decision-making. Lately, a dialogical, i.e., dialogue-based, approach has been argued for in bioethics. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the decision-making processes that may be involved in this dialogical approach, as well as related pitfalls that may have to be addressed in order for this approach to be helpful, particularly in clinical ethics. Using informal logic, an analysis is presented of the (...)
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  44. Lainie Friedman Ross (2007). The Moral Status of the Newborn and its Implications for Medical Decision Making. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):349-355.score: 303.0
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  45. Kristine Baerøe (2010). Patient Autonomy, Assessment of Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making: A Call for Reasonableness in Deciding for Others. Bioethics 24 (2):87-95.score: 303.0
  46. Edwin Hui (2008). Parental Refusal of Life-Saving Treatments for Adolescents: Chinese Familism in Medical Decision-Making Re-Visited. Bioethics 22 (5):286-295.score: 303.0
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  47. Ben A. Rich (1998). Limits—The Role of the Law in Bioethical Decision Making, by Roger B. Dworkin. Bloomington (IN): Indiana University Press, 1996. 205 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (01):108-111.score: 299.0
    Anyone with so much as a passing familiarity with bioethics knows how significantly and persistently (at least since mid-century) the law has insinuated itself into healthcare and the process of bioethical decisionmaking. Viewed from the insular perspective of traditional medical practice and medical ethics, it is not surprising that the of the patientlimitshavoc” wreaked by law upon the landscape of medical practice, painted by a lawyer, stands in stark contrast to an earlier and much more sympathetic account offered by (...)
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  48. Fan Ruiping (2012). Confucian Reflective Equilibrium: Why Principlism is Misleading for Chinese Bioethical Decision-Making. Asian Bioethics Review 4 (1):4-13.score: 299.0
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  49. W. Burg (forthcoming). Review of the Book Limits: The Role of the Law in Bioethical Decision Making, Roger B. Dworkin, 1998. [REVIEW] Bioethics.score: 299.0
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  50. Jack W. Provonsha (forthcoming). Perceptions of Death in Bioethical Decision Making. Bioethics Today: A New Ethical Vision.score: 299.0
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