Search results for 'Bioethics Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Henri Atlan (2011). Selected Writings on Self-Organization, Philosophy, Bioethics, and Judaism. Fordham University Press.score: 66.0
    Self-organization -- Organisms, finalisms, programs, machines -- Spinoza -- Judaism, determinism, and rationalities -- Fabricating the living -- Ethics.
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  2. Warren A. Shibles (2010). The Philosophy and Practice of Medicine and Bioethics: A Naturalistic-Humanistic Approach. Springer.score: 63.0
    This book completes medical care by adding the comprehensive humanistic perspectives and philosophy of medicine.
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  3. Mingxian Shen (2008). Ke Xue Zhe Xue Yu Sheng Ming Lun Li: Shen Mingxian Wen Ji = the Philosophy of Science and the Bioethics. Shanghai She Hui Ke Xue Yuan Chu Ban She.score: 60.0
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  4. George Khushf (1997). Why Bioethics Needs the Philosophy of Medicine: Some Implications of Reflection on Concepts of Health and Disease. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).score: 51.0
    Germund Hesslow has argued that concepts of health and disease serve no important scientific, clinical, or ethical function. However, this conclusion depends upon the particular concept of disease he espouses; namely, on Boorse's functional notion. The fact/value split embodied in the functional notion of disease leads to a sharp split between the science of medicine and bioethics, making the philosophy of medicine irrelevant for both. By placing this disease concept in the broader context of medical history, I shall (...)
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  5. George Khushf (ed.) (2004). Handbook of Bioethics: Taking Stock of the Field From a Philosophical Perspective. Kluwer Academic.score: 51.0
    This book is for those interested in an extensive review of the field of bioethics. It is for philosophers who wish to understand the core conceptual issues in health care ethics, and for bioethicists who wish to better understand classical problems in philosophy that have a bearing on health care ethics. The Handbook of Bioethics: Taking Stock of the Field from a Philosophical Perspective: -presents a comprehensive survey of bioethics in one volume; -has 27 of the (...)
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  6. Iain Brassington (2013). What's the Point of Philosophical Bioethics? Health Care Analysis 21 (1):20-30.score: 51.0
    Many people working in bioethics take pride in the subject’s embrace of a wide range of disciplines. This invites questions of what in particular is added by each. In this paper, I focus on the role of philosophy within the field: what, if anything, is its unique contribution to bioethics? I sketch out a claim that philosophy is central to bioethics because of its particular analytic abilities, and defend its place within bioethics from a (...)
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  7. Loretta M. Kopelman, David Resnick & Douglas L. Weed (2004). What is the Role of the Precautionary Principle in the Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (3):255 – 258.score: 51.0
    (2004). What is the Role of the Precautionary Principle in the Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: Vol. 29, No. 3, pp. 255-258.
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  8. Kyungsuk Choi (2008). Bioethics” as a New Challenge to Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:37-51.score: 51.0
    The advance of medical and biological science and technology has presented us with new ethical and legal issues. Is embryonic stem cell research morally justified and legally allowed? What moral status do embryos have? Who can be a morally appropriate user of In Vitro fertilization? Who can use donated sperm and/or egg? What is the scope of reproductive liberty?” What is the meaning of a family and that of reproduction? How far does our genetic intervention go?”Scientists, lawyers, and laymen are (...)
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  9. Nicholas Capaldi (2007). How Philosophy and Theology Have Undermined Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 13 (1):53-66.score: 51.0
    This essay begins by distinguishing among the viewpoints of philosophy, theology, and religion; it then explores how each deals with ‘sin’ in the bioethical context. The conclusions are that the philosophical and theological viewpoints are intellectually defective in that they cripple our ability to deal with normative issues, and are in the end unable to integrate Christian concepts like ‘sin’ successfully into bioethics. Sin is predicated only of beings with free will, though only in Western Christianity must all (...)
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  10. J. A. Bulcock (2013). Introduction to a Collection of Issues Within Bioethics, Philosophy of Medicine, and Philosophy of Psychiatry. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):83-90.score: 48.0
  11. Vicki Langendyk (2011). Philosophy Should and Can Contribute to Bioethics. Metascience 20 (2):359-361.score: 48.0
    Philosophy should and can contribute to bioethics Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9476-2 Authors Vicki Langendyk, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, NSW 1797, Australia Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  12. William E. Stempsey (2007). Medical Humanities and Philosophy: Is the Universe Expanding or Contracting? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):373-383.score: 48.0
    The question of whether the universe is expanding or contracting serves as a model for current questions facing the medical humanities. The medical humanities might aptly be described as a metamedical multiverse encompassing many separate universes of discourse, the most prominent of which is probably bioethics. Bioethics, however, is increasingly developing into a new interdisciplinary discipline, and threatens to engulf the other medical humanities, robbing them of their own distinctive contributions to metamedicine. The philosophy of medicine considered (...)
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  13. Onora O'Neill (2002). Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Why has autonomy been a leading idea in philosophical writing on bioethics, and why has trust been marginal? In this important book, Onora O'Neill suggests that the conceptions of individual autonomy so widely relied on in bioethics are philosophically and ethically inadequate, and that they undermine rather than support relations of trust. She shows how Kant's non-individualistic view of autonomy provides a stronger basis for an approach to medicine, science and biotechnology, and does not marginalize untrustworthiness, while also (...)
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  14. Kenneth K. W. Goodman (1999). Philosophy as News: Bioethics, Journalism and Public Policy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (2):181 – 200.score: 42.0
    News media accounts of issues in bioethics gain significance to the extent that the media influence public policy and inform personal decision making. The increasingly frequent appearance of bioethics in the news thus imposes responsibilities on journalists and their sources. These responsibilities are identified and discussed, as is (i) the concept of "newsworthiness" as applied to bioethics, (ii) the variable quality of bioethics reportage and (iii) journalists' reliance on ethicists to pass judgment. Because of the potential (...)
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  15. Carl Elliott (ed.) (2001). Slow Cures and Bad Philosophers: Essays on Wittgenstein, Medicine, and Bioethics. Duke University Press.score: 42.0
    "Carl Elliott always writes intriguing essays at the intersection between ethics, medicine, and general philosophy, so it is a real pleasure to have a new ...
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  16. Catherine Womack & Norah Mulvaney-Day (2012). Feminist Bioethics Meets Experimental Philosophy: Embracing the Qualitative and Experiential. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (1):113-132.score: 42.0
    Experimental philosophy (henceforth called X-Phi) represents a departure in methodology from standard twentieth-century philosophy; instead of privileging intuitions of professional philosophers to analyze philosophical concepts such as moral responsibility, knowledge, or intentional action, X-Phi catalogs and analyzes the intuitions of ordinary folk1 about scenarios designed to uncover the content of those concepts as found in standard usage. It formulates explanations of those intuitions that may reveal more complex and nuanced accounts of those same philosophical concepts. X-philosophers work to (...)
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  17. Jui-pʻing Fan (ed.) (1999). Confucian Bioethics. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 42.0
    This volume explores Confucian views regarding the human body, health, virtue, suffering, suicide, euthanasia, `human drugs,' human experimentation, and justice in health care distribution. These views are rooted in Confucian metaphysical, cosmological, and moral convictions, which stand in contrast to modern Western liberal perspectives in a number of important ways. In the contemporary world, a wide variety of different moral traditions flourish; there is real moral diversity. Given this circumstance, difficult and even painful ethical conflicts often occur between the East (...)
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  18. Marcus Düwell (2013). Bioethics: Methods, Theories, Domains. Routledge.score: 42.0
    This book is a philosophically-oriented introduction to bioethics.
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  19. Elena Abrudan (2011). Ethical Expertise and Bioethics. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (30):397-402.score: 42.0
    800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false RO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Review of Mihaela Frunză, Expertiza etică și bioetica. Studii de caz (Ethical Expertise and Bioethics. Case Studies). Cluj-Napoca, Limes Publishing House, 2010.
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  20. Tom Koch (2012). Thieves of Virtue: When Bioethics Stole Medicine. Mit Press.score: 42.0
    Bioethics claimed to offer a set of generally applicable, universally accepted guidelines that would simplify complex situations. In Thieves of Virtue, Tom Koch argues that bioethics has failed to deliver on its promises.
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  21. Nancy M. P. King & Michael J. Hyde (eds.) (2011). Bioethics, Public Moral Argument, and Social Responsibility. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Bioethics, Public Moral Argument, and Social Responsibility explores the role of democratically oriented argument in promoting public understanding and discussion of the benefits and burdens of biotechnological progress. The contributors examine moral and policy controversies surrounding biomedical technologies and their place in American society, beginning with an examination of discourse and moral authority in democracy, and addressing a set of issues that include: dignity in health care; the social responsibilities of scientists, journalists, and scholars; and the language of genetics (...)
     
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  22. Lisa Bortolotti (2007). Disputes Over Moral Status: Philosophy and Science in the Future of Bioethics. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (2):153-8.score: 39.0
    Various debates in bioethics have been focused on whether non-persons, such as marginal humans or non-human animals, deserve respectful treatment. It has been argued that, where we cannot agree on whether these individuals have moral status, we might agree that they have symbolic value and ascribe to them moral value in virtue of their symbolic significance. In the paper I resist the suggestion that symbolic value is relevant to ethical disputes in which the respect for individuals with no intrinsic (...)
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  23. Stuart J. Murray & Dave Holmes (2013). Toward a Critical Ethical Reflexivity: Phenomenology and Language in Maurice Merleau‐Ponty. Bioethics 27 (6):341-347.score: 39.0
    Working within the tradition of continental philosophy, this article argues in favour of a phenomenological understanding of language as a crucial component of bioethical inquiry. The authors challenge the ‘commonsense’ view of language, in which thinking appears as prior to speaking, and speech the straightforward vehicle of pre-existing thoughts. Drawing on Maurice Merleau-Ponty's (1908–1961) phenomenology of language, the authors claim that thinking takes place in and through the spoken word, in and through embodied language. This view resituates bioethics (...)
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  24. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, Jeremy R. Garrett & Fabrice Jotterand (2006). Bioethics and the Philosophy of Medicine: A Thirty-Year Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):565 – 568.score: 39.0
  25. Rachel A. Ankeny (2003). How History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine Could Save the Life of Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):115 – 125.score: 39.0
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  26. H. T. Engelhardt (1999). Can Philosophy Save Christianity? Are the Roots of the Foundations of Christian Bioethics Ecumenical? Reflections on the Nature of a Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 5 (3):203-212.score: 39.0
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  27. H. T. Engelhardt (2002). Medicine, Philosophy, and Theology: Christian Bioethics Reconsidered. Christian Bioethics 8 (2):105-117.score: 39.0
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  28. Howard Brody & Arlene Macdonald (2013). Religion and Bioethics: Toward an Expanded Understanding. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):133-145.score: 39.0
    Before asking what U.S. bioethics might learn from a more comprehensive and more nuanced understanding of Islamic religion, history, and culture, a prior question is, how should bioethics think about religion? Two sets of commonly held assumptions impede further progress and insight. The first involves what “religion” means and how one should study it. The second is a prominent philosophical view of the role of religion in a diverse, democratic society. To move beyond these assumptions, it helps to (...)
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  29. Peter Janich & Michael Weingarten (2002). Verantwortung Ohne Verständnis? Wie Die Ethikdebatte Zur Gentechnik Von Deren Wissenschaftstheorie Abhängt. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (1):85-120.score: 39.0
    Responsibility Without Understanding? How the Debate on the Ethics of Genetic Engineering Depends on Its Philosophy of Science. The main thesis in this paper is that bioethics has no own criteria to judge the chances and risks of genetic engineering. But if we distinguish (1) between different types of genetic, (2) between genetic engineering as a set of methods for experimentation and genetic engineering as an industrial technique and (3) reconstruct the metaphors and the terminology in general, which (...)
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  30. J. R. Engelhardt, Jeremy R. Garrett & Fabrice Jotterand (2006). Bioethics and the Philosophy of Medicine: A Thirty-Year Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):565 – 568.score: 39.0
  31. Loretta M. Kopelman & Laurence B. McCullough (1999). Hume, Bioethics, and Philosophy of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (4):315 – 321.score: 39.0
  32. A. E. Hinkley (2008). Metaphysical Problems in the Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (2):101-105.score: 39.0
  33. Francesca Marin (2013). Barbara Maier and Warren A. Shibles: The Philosophy and Practice of Medicine and Bioethics: A Naturalistic-Humanistic Approach. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (1):59-63.score: 39.0
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  34. Masahiro Morioka (2012). Human Dignity and the Manipulation of the Sense of Happiness: From the Viewpoint of Bioethics and Philosophy of Life. Journal of Philosophy of Life 2 (1):1-14.score: 39.0
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  35. Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta (2012). Ruth Groenhoutis a Professor of Philosophy at Calvin College, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Her Publications Focus on a Range of Issues in Bioethics and an Ethics of Care, and Include Bioethics: A Reformed Look at Life and Death Choices, Con-Nected Lives: Human Nature and an Ethics of Care, and Feminism, Faith, Philoso-Phy, as Well as a Variety of Journal Articles on Issues Ranging From the Ethics Of. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (1).score: 39.0
  36. Salvino Leone (2012). The Features of a “Mediterranean” Bioethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):431-436.score: 39.0
    Even if somebody considers inappropriate any geographic adjective for Bioethics, nevertheless we think that there are some specific features of “Mediterranean” Bioethics that could distinguish it from a “Northern-European and Northern-American” one. First of all we must consider that medical ethics was born and grew in Mediterranean area. First by the thought of great Greek philosophers as Aristotle (that analyse what ethics is), then by Hippocrates, the “father” of medical ethics. The ethical pattern of Aristotle was based on (...)
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  37. Glenn McGee (2006). Will Bioethics Take the Life of Philosophy? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):1 – 2.score: 39.0
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  38. Baruch A. Brody (1990). The Role of Philosophy in Public Policy and Bioethics: Introduction. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (4):345-346.score: 39.0
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  39. R. A. Carson & C. R. Burns (eds.) (1997). Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics. Kluwer.score: 39.0
    Papers presented at a symposium on philosophy and medicine at the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch in 1974 were published in the inaugural volume of this series.
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  40. Kevin Wm Wildes (2002). Bioethics as Social Philosophy. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):113-125.score: 39.0
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  41. Adam Briggle (2010). A Rich Bioethics: Public Policy, Biotechnology, and the Kass Council. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 39.0
     
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  42. Chester R. Burns (1997). JOHN D. ARRAS is the Porterfield Professor of Biomedical Ethics at the University of Virginia, Charlotte, Where He Directs the Undergraduate Bioethics Program. Before Coming to Virginia in 1995, He Was for Fourteen Years a Professor of Bioethks at Monte-Fiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Adjunct Professor of Philosophy at Barnard College, Columbia University. He is the Editor (with Bonnie Stein. [REVIEW] In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Stories and Their Limits: Narrative Approaches to Bioethics. Routledge. 273.score: 39.0
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  43. Ronald A. Carson, Chester R. Burns & Merle Spriggs (2000). Book Reviews-Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics: A Twenty-Year Retrospective and Critical Appraisal. Bioethics-Oxford 14 (2):175-177.score: 39.0
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  44. Max Charlesworth (forthcoming). Bioethics and the Limits of Philosophy. Bioethics.score: 39.0
     
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  45. Chung-Ying Cheng (2002). Bioethics and Philosophy of Bioethics: A New Orientation. In. In Julia Lai Po-Wah Tao (ed.), Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the (Im) Possibility of Global Bioethics. Kluwer Academic Pub.. 335--357.score: 39.0
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  46. Aaron E. Hinkley (2008). Metaphysical Problems in the Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (2):101-105.score: 39.0
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  47. A. Twenty-Year Retrospective (2002). Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics. Philosophy 50.score: 39.0
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  48. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jeremy Garrett & Fabrice Jotterand (2006). Bioethics and the Philosophy of Medicine: A Thirty-Year Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):565-568.score: 39.0
  49. Robert M. Veatch (1995). Bioethics and Philosophy of Science. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):227-231.score: 39.0
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  50. Earl Winkler (1996). Moral Philosophy and Bioethics: Contextualism Versus the Paradigm Theory. In Wayne L. Sumner & Joseph Boyle (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Bioethics. University of Toronto Press. 50--78.score: 39.0
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