Search results for 'Biological Specimen Banks ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner (ed.) (2009). Human Genetic Biobanks in Asia: Politics of Trust and Scientific Advancement. Routledge.score: 102.0
    This volume investigates human genetic biobanking and its regulation in various Asian countries and areas, including Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, ...
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  2. Jane Kaye (ed.) (2012). Governing Biobanks: Understanding the Interplay Between Law and Practice. Hart Pub..score: 102.0
     
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  3. A. Mongoven & H. McGee (2011). IRB Review and Public Health Biobanking: A Case Study of the Michigan BioTrust for Health. Irb 34 (3):11-16.score: 100.5
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  4. Gerrit van Schalkwyk, Jantina de Vries & Keymanthri Moodley (2012). "It's for a Good Cause, Isn't It?" - Exploring Views of South African TB Research Participants on Sample Storage and Re-Use. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):19-.score: 74.0
    Background: The banking of biological samples raises a number of ethical issues in relation to the storage,export and re-use of samples. Whilst there is a growing body of literature exploringparticipant perspectives in North America and Europe, hardly any studies have been reportedin Africa. This is problematic in particular in light of the growing amount of research takingplace in Africa, and with the rise of biobanking practices also on the African continent. Inorder to investigate the perspectives of African research participants, (...)
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  5. S. A. McGraw, C. A. Wood-Nutter, M. Z. Solomon, K. J. Maschke, J. T. Bensen, J. T. Benson & D. E. Irwin (2011). Clarity and Appeal of a Multimedia Informed Consent Tool for Biobanking. Irb 34 (1):9-19.score: 58.5
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  6. Aslam Sathar, Amaboo Dhai & Stephan Linde (2013). Collaborative International Research: Ethical and Regulatory Issues Pertaining to Human Biological Materials at a South African Institutional Research Ethics Committee. Developing World Bioethics 14 (1).score: 54.0
    Human Biological Materials (HBMs) are an invaluable resource in biomedical research. Objective To determine if researchers and a Research Ethics Committee (REC) at a South African institution addressed ethical issues pertaining to HBMs in collaborative research with developed countries. Study Design Ethically approved retrospective cross-sectional descriptive audit. Results Of the 1305 protocols audited, 151 (11.57%) fulfilled the study's inclusion criteria. Compared to other developed countries, a majority of sponsors (90) were from the USA (p = 0.0001). The principle (...)
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  7. Jeffery W. Bentley & Robert J. O'Neil (1997). On the Ethics of Biological Control of Insect Pests. Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):283-289.score: 54.0
    Of the four types of biological control, (1) natural, (2) conservation, (3) augmentation, and (4) importation), ethical concerns have been raised almost exclusively about only one type: importation. These concerns rest largely on fears of extinction of animal species. Importation biological control is a cost-effective alternative to chemical control for basic food crops of resource-poor farmers. Regarding the other types of biological control, natural biological control is not consciously manipulated by humans. Augmentation has some technical concerns, (...)
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  8. Francisco J. Ayala (2010). The Biological Foundations of Ethics. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 66 (3):523 - 537.score: 52.5
    Erect posture and large brain are two of the most significant anatomical traits that distinguish us from nonhuman primates. But humans are also different from chimpanzees and other animals, and no less importantly, in their behavior, both as individuals and socially. Distinctive human behavioral attributes include tool-making and technology; abstract thinking, categorizing, and reasoning; symbolic (creative) language; self-awareness and death-awareness; science, literature, and art; legal codes, ethics and religion; complex social organization and political institutions. These traits may all be (...)
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  9. J. Jabour (2010). Biological Prospecting: The Ethics of Exclusive Reward From Antarctic Activity. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 10 (1):19-29.score: 52.5
    ABSTRACT: Biological prospecting is being undertaken in the Antarctic and, as novel material starts to yield significantly higher commercial rewards, the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties might decide to regulate it through the Antarctic Treaty System. This will be problematic since activities are already being undertaken, patents have been filed and products developed. Furthermore, there are differing perceptions of the status of the Antarctic, with some considering it global commons and others considering it the common heritage of mankind. These 2 (...)
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  10. Seumas Miller & Michael J. Selgelid (2007). Ethical and Philosophical Consideration of the Dual-Use Dilemma in the Biological Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):523-580.score: 51.0
    The dual-use dilemma arises in the context of research in the biological and other sciences as a consequence of the fact that one and the same piece of scientific research sometimes has the potential to be used for bad as well as good purposes. It is an ethical dilemma since it is about promoting good in the context of the potential for also causing harm, e.g., the promotion of health in the context of providing the wherewithal for the killing (...)
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  11. Hendrik Gommer (2014). The Biological Foundations of Global Ethics and Law. Archiv Fuer Rechts- Und Sozialphilosphie 100 (2):151-175.score: 49.5
    This article attempts to translate philosophical notions into biological terms in order to transform dualistic thinking into monistic thinking. What if ethics finds its cause in physical, molecular processes? In Ruling Passions Simon Blackburn acknowledges the biological fact that we are social animals and that we need to coordinate our efforts. Therein lies an opportunity for a fruitful discussion about the biological foundation of ethics. Although Blackburn thinks there cannot be a grand unifying theory or (...)
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  12. Francisco Ayala (2010). What the Biological Sciences Can and Cannot Contribute to Ethics. In Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Wiley-Blackwell Pub..score: 49.0
    The question whether ethical behavior is biologically determined may refer either to the capacity for ethics (i.e., the proclivity to judge human actions as either right or wrong), or to the moral norms accepted by human beings for guiding their actions. I herein propose: (1) that the capacity for ethics is a necessary attribute of human nature; and (2) that moral norms are products of cultural evolution, not of biological evolution. Humans exhibit ethical behavior by nature because (...)
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  13. Michael Ruse (2010). The Biological Sciences Can Act as a Ground for Ethics. In Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Wiley-Blackwell Pub..score: 49.0
    This paper is interested in the relationship between evolutionary thinking and moral behavior and commitments, ethics. There is a traditional way of forging or conceiving of the relationship. This is traditional evolutionary ethics, known as Social Darwinism. Many think that this position is morally pernicious, a redescription of the worst aspects of modern, laissez-faire capitalism in fancy biological language. It is argued that, in fact, there is much more to be said for Social Darwinism than many think. (...)
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  14. A. T. Nuyen (2007). Confucian Ethics and "the Age of Biological Control". Philosophy East and West 57 (1):83-96.score: 48.0
    : Ronald Dworkin claims that if we are able to control our own biology, "our most settled convictions will . . . be undermined [and] we will be in a kind of moral free-fall." This is so because he takes moral convictions to be determined by the choices we make against a fixed biological background. It would seem that if Confucian ethics is grounded in ren xing (human nature) and if ren xing refers to a fixed biological (...)
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  15. Gjalt de Graaf (2001). Discourse Theory and Business Ethics. The Case of Bankers' Conceptualizations of Customers. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):299-319.score: 48.0
    Within discourse theory, language is seen as constitutive of reality. Furthermore, facts and values are viewed as inseparable. This has consequences for business ethics. In this paper the relationship between discourse theory and business ethics is discussed. Both the descriptive and prescriptive aspects of business ethics are taken into account. Furthermore, an example of an empirical study is presented. A discourse analysis is conducted to answer the questions of how bankers in Holland conceptualize and (...)
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  16. J. Barkmann & R. Marggraf (2004). The Long-Term Protection of Biological Diversity—Lessons From Market Ethics. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):3-21.score: 48.0
    Economic markets are not morally free zones. Contrary to popular misconceptions, market functioning rests on the ethical principles of fairness and voluntariness. This ethical foundation can be traced back at least to moral philosopher Adam Smith, one of the founders of modern economics. In the inconspicuous form of microeconomic axioms, these moral foundations are preserved. Thus, virtually all “neo-classic” economic concepts presuppose a market ethics of fairness and voluntariness. In a world of pervasive uncertainty on the long-term development of (...)
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  17. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1996). The Ethics of Biological Control: Understanding the Moral Implications of Our Most Powerful Ecological Technology. Agriculture and Human Values 13 (1):2-19.score: 48.0
    A system of environmental ethics recently developed by Lawrence Johnson may be used to analyze the moral implications of biological control. According to this system, entities are morally relevant when they possess well-being interests (i.e., functions or processes that can be better or worse in so far as the entity is concerned). In this formulation of ethical analysis, species and ecosystems are morally relevant because they are not simply aggregates of individuals, so their processes, properties, and well-being interests (...)
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  18. Peter M. Rosset (1997). Cuba: Ethics, Biological Control, and Crisis. Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):291-302.score: 48.0
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  19. Derek Reiners (2008). Biological Correctness: Thomas Hobbes' Natural Ethics. Hobbes Studies 21 (1):63-83.score: 48.0
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  20. Gabrielle N. Samuel & Ian H. Kerridge (2007). Equity, Utility, and the Marketplace: Emerging Ethical Issues of Umbilical Cord Blood Banking in Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):57-63.score: 45.0
    Over the past decade, umbilical cord blood (UCB) has routinely been used as a source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic stem cell transplants in the treatment of a range of malignant and non-malignant conditions affecting children and adults. UCB banks are a necessary part of the UCB transplant program, but their establishment has raised a number of important scientific, ethical and political issues. This paper examines the scientific and clinical evidence that has provided the basis for the establishment (...)
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  21. Donald Chalmers, Dianne Nicol, Pilar Nicolás & Nikolajs Zeps (forthcoming). A Role for Research Ethics Committees in Exchanges of Human Biospecimens Through Material Transfer Agreements. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-6.score: 45.0
    International transfers of human biological material (biospecimens) and data are increasing, and commentators are starting to raise concerns about how donor wishes are protected in such circumstances. These exchanges are generally made under contractual material transfer agreements (MTAs). This paper asks what role, if any, should research ethics committees (RECs) play in ensuring legal and ethical conduct in such exchanges. It is recommended that RECs should play a more active role in the future development of best practice MTAs (...)
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  22. William J. Mitchell, Phillip V. Lewis & N. L. Reinsch (1992). Bank Ethics: An Exploratory Study of Ethical Behaviors and Perceptions in Small, Local Banks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (3):197 - 205.score: 44.5
    This article addresses five research questions: What specific behaviors are described in the literature as ethical or unethical? What percentage of business people are believed to be guilty of unethical behavior? What specific unethical behaviors have been observed by bank employees? How serious are the behaviors? Are experiences and attitudes affected by demographics? Conclusions suggest: There are seventeen categories of behavior, and that they are heavily skewed toward internal behaviors. Younger employees have a higher level of ethical consciousness than older (...)
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  23. Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). Biology and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 43.5
    This stimulating and wide-ranging book mounts a profound enquiry into some of the most pressing questions of our age, by examining the relationship between biological science and Christianity. The history of biological discovery is explored from the point of view of a leading philosopher and ethicist. What effect should modern biological theory and practice have on Christian understanding of ethics? How much of that theory and practice should Christians endorse? Can Christians, for example, agree that (...) changes are not governed by transcendent values, or that there are no clear or essential boundaries between species? To what extent can 'Nature' set our standards? Professor Clark takes a reasoned look at biological theory since Darwin and argues that an orthodox Christian philosophy is better able to accommodate the truth of such theory than is the sort of progressive, meliorist interpretation of Christian doctrine which is usually offered as the properly 'modern' option. (shrink)
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  24. Paul Lawrence (forthcoming). A Biological Base for Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly.score: 43.5
     
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  25. V. Moises Serrano-Delgado, Barbara Novello-Garza & Edith Valdez-Martinez (2009). Ethical Issues Relating the the Banking of Umbilical Cord Blood in Mexico. BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):12-.score: 42.0
    BackgroundUmbilical cord banks are a central component, as umbilical cord tissue providers, in both medical treatment and scientific research with stem cells. But, whereas the creation of umbilical cord banks is seen as successful practice, it is perceived as a risky style of play by others. This article examines and discusses the ethical, medical and legal considerations that arise from the operation of umbilical cord banks in Mexico.DiscussionA number of experts have stated that the use of umbilical (...)
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  26. Antonio Argandoña (1999). Ethics in Finance and Public Policy: The Ibercorp Case. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (3):219 - 231.score: 42.0
    The "Ibercorp affair" was front-page news in Spain at various times between 1992 and 1995. In itself, there was nothing particularly new about it: a newly formed financial group engaged in legally and ethically reprehensible behaviour that eventually came to light in the media, ruining the company (and the careers of those involved). What aroused public interest at the time was the fact that it involved individuals connected with Spanish public and political life, the media and certain business circles. Above (...)
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  27. Herbert Voigt (2010). Editorial: A Need for a Universal Code of Ethics for Medical and Biological Engineers. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 1 (2):79-81.score: 42.0
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  28. Brian Rappert (ed.) (2010). Education and Ethics in the Life Sciences: Strengthening the Prohibition of Biological Weapons. Anu E Press.score: 42.0
    At the start of the twenty-first century, warnings have been raised in some quarters about how - by intent or by mishap - advances in biotechnology and related ...
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  29. Stanley Joel Reiser (2002). The Ethics Movement in the Biological and Health Sciences. In Ruth Ellen Bulger, Elizabeth Heitman & Stanley Joel Reiser (eds.), The Ethical Dimensions of the Biological and Health Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
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  30. Madeline Schmitt & Anne Stewart (2011). Commentary on 'Interprofessional Ethics: A Developing Field?'—A Response to Banks Et Al. (2010). Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (1):72-78.score: 42.0
    In this commentary on a previous Ethics and Social Welfare publication, the authors argue that inclusive and expansive dialogue about interprofessional ethics is more a matter of ??revitalizing?? traditional professional ethics than developing a new field. The dialogue will be most productive of care improvements if it incorporates the service user, includes both health and social care professions, and occurs across countries.
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  31. Alex Rosenberg (2009). The Biological Justification of Ethics: A Best-Case Scenario. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (01):86-.score: 40.5
    Social and behavioral scientists - that is, students of human nature - nowadays hardly ever use the term ‘human nature’. This reticence reflects both a becoming modesty about the aims of their disciplines and a healthy skepticism about whether there is any one thing really worthy of the label ‘human nature’.
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  32. R. W. Gerard (1942). A Biological Basis for Ethics. Philosophy of Science 9 (1):92-120.score: 40.5
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  33. Donald J. Munro (2002). Reciprocal Altruism and the Biological Basis of Ethics in Neo-Confucianism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):131-141.score: 40.5
  34. Peter Singer, The Biological Basis of Ethics.score: 40.5
    We should all agree that each of us is bound to show kindness to his parents and spouse and children, and to other kinsmen in a less degree; and to those who have rendered services to him, and any others whom he may have admitted to his intimacy and called friends; and to neighbours and to fellow-countrymen more than others; and perhaps we may say to those of our own race more than to black or yellow men, and generally to (...)
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  35. Glenn C. Graber (1997). Biological Sciences and Ethics: Models of Cooperation. Philosophia 25 (1-4):71-82.score: 40.5
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  36. Jeremy N. Skepper (1999). Biological Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy. Bioessays 21 (9):802-802.score: 40.5
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  37. J. Kerin (1999). Genetic Research and Biological Weapons: The Ethics of the Human Genome Project. Monash Bioethics Review 18 (3):1-10.score: 40.5
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  38. Stanley Joel Reiser (1994). Misconduct and the Development of Ethics in the Biological Sciences. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (04):499-.score: 39.0
  39. Dan L. Burk (2002). Lex Genetica: The Law and Ethics of Programming Biological Code. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 4 (2):109-121.score: 39.0
    Recent advances in genetic engineering nowallow the design of programmable biologicalartifacts. Such programming may include usageconstraints that will alter the balance ofownership and control for biotechnologyproducts. Similar changes have been analyzedin the context of digital content managementsystems, and while this previous work is usefulin analyzing issues related to biologicalprogramming, the latter technology presents new conceptual problems that require morecomprehensive evaluation of the interplaybetween law and technologically embeddedvalues. In particular, the ability to embedcontractual terms in technological artifactsnow requires a re-examination of (...)
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  40. Colin Farrelly (2013). Empirical Ethics and the Duty to Extend the “Biological Warranty Period”. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):480-503.score: 39.0
    The world's aging populations face novel health challenges never experienced before in human history. The moral landscape thus needs to adapt to reflect this novel empirical reality. In this paper I take for granted one basic moral principle advanced by Peter Singer and explore the implications that empirical considerations from demography, evolutionary biology, and biogerontology have for the way we conceive of fulfilling this principle at the operational level. After bringing to the fore a number of considerations that Singer ignores, (...)
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  41. N. Messer (2006). Book Review: Evolution and Ethics: Human Morality in Biological and Religious Perspective. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (2):240-243.score: 39.0
  42. Commission European (1999). European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies; Human Tissue Banks; Human Embryo Research. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 5 (1):1.score: 39.0
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  43. Warner Fite (1916). Birth-Control and Biological Ethics. International Journal of Ethics 27 (1):50-66.score: 39.0
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  44. T. Stammers (2009). Book Review: Banks S, Gallagher A 2008: Ethics in Professional Life: Virtues for Health and Social Care. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 267 Pp. GBP18.99 (PB) ISBN 978 0 230 507197. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 16 (5):671-672.score: 39.0
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  45. Nin Kirkham (2013). Transcending Our Biology: A Virtue Ethics Interpretation of the Appeal to Nature in Technological and Environmental Ethics. Zygon 48 (4):875-889.score: 37.5
    “Arguments from nature” are used, and have historically been used, in popular responses to advances in technology and to environmental issues—there is a widely shared body of ethical intuitions that nature, or perhaps human nature, sets some limits on the kinds of ends that we should seek, the kinds of things that we should do, or the kinds of lives that we should lead. Virtue ethics can provide the context for a defensible form of the argument from nature, and (...)
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  46. Evan Fales, Review of Darwinian Natural Right: The Biological Ethics of Human Nature by Larry Arnhart. [REVIEW]score: 37.0
    It has become something of a leitmotif among evangelical apologetes to argue that morality can have no objective foundation if there is no God. Using a strategy that appeals to many people's strong intuitions that there are objective rights and wrongs, they claim seek to convict atheists of being intellectually committed to moral relativism, subjectivism, or nihilism. Those are, of course, ethical positions that have been advocated by some atheists. But others share the intuition that there are objective moral norms, (...)
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  47. Giovanni Boniolo & Gabriele De Anna (eds.) (2006). Evolutionary Ethics and Contemporary Biology. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    How can the discoveries made in the biological sciences play a role in a discussion on the foundation of ethics? This book responds to this question by examining how evolutionism can explain and justify the existence of ethical normativity and the emergence of particular moral systems. Written by a team of philosophers and scientists, the essays collected in this volume deal with the limits of evolutionary explanations, the justifications of ethics, and methodological issues concerning evolutionary accounts of (...)
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  48. Cynthia Willett (2012). Ground Zero for a Post-Moral Ethics in J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace and Julia Kristeva's Melancholic. Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):1-22.score: 36.0
    Perhaps no other novel has received as much attention from moral philosophers as South African writer J. M. Coetzee’s Disgrace . The novel is ethically compelling and yet no moral theory explains its force. Despite clear Kantian moments, neither rationalism nor self-respect can account for the strange ethical task that the protagonist sets for himself. Calling himself the dog man, like the ancient Cynics, this shamelessly cynical protagonist takes his cues for ethics not from humans but from animals. He (...)
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  49. Charles D. Kay (2007). Philip Clayton and Jeffrey Schloss (Eds): Evolution and Ethics: Human Morality in Biological and Religious Perspective. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):57-59.score: 36.0
  50. Michael Bradie (1993). Ethics and Evolution: The Biological Basis of Morality. Inquiry 36 (1 & 2):199 – 217.score: 36.0
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