Search results for 'Biology History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marjorie Grene (2004). The Philosophy of Biology: An Episodic History. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
    Is life different from the non-living? If so, how? And how, in that case, does biology as the study of living things differ from other sciences? These questions are traced through an exploration of episodes in the history of biology and philosophy. The book begins with Aristotle, then moves on to Descartes comparing his position with that of Harvey. In the eighteenth century the authors consider Buffon and Kant. In the nineteenth century the authors examine the Cuvier-Geoffroy (...)
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  2. Samuel J. M. M. Alberti (2001). Amateurs and Professionals in One County: Biology and Natural History in Late Victorian Yorkshire. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):115 - 147.score: 75.0
    My goals in this paper are twofold: to outline the refashioning of amateur and professional roles in life science in late Victorian Yorkshire, and to provide a revised historiography of the relationship between amateurs and professionals in this era. Some historical treatments of this relationship assume that amateurs were demoralized by the advances of laboratory science, and so ceased to contribute and were left behind by the autonomous "new biology." Despite this view, I show that many amateurs played a (...)
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  3. Allen duPont Breck & Wolfgang Yourgrau (eds.) (1972/1974). Biology, History, and Natural Philosophy. [New York,Plenum Press.score: 69.0
  4. Michael Ruse (2009). Defining Darwin: Essays on the History and Philosophy of Evolutionary Biology. Prometheus Books.score: 66.0
  5. Thomas Junker (1996). Factors Shaping Ernst Mayr's Concepts in the History of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):29 - 77.score: 60.0
    As frequently pointed out in this discussion, one of the most characteristic features of Mayr's approach to the history of biology stems from the fact that he is dealing to a considerable degree with his own professional history. Furthermore, his main criterion for the selection of historical episodes is their relevance for modern biological theory. As W. F. Bynum and others have noted, the general impression of his reviewers is that “one of the towering figures of evolutionary (...)
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  6. Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Biological Conception of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):1-28.score: 57.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that Kant's philosophy of biology has crucial implications for our understanding of his philosophy of history, and that overlooking these implications leads to a fundamental misconstruction of his views. More precisely, I will show that Kant's philosophy of history is modelled on his philosophy of biology due to the fact that the development of the human species shares a number of peculiar features with the functioning of organisms, these (...)
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  7. David L. Hull (1994). Ernst Mayr's Influence on the History and Philosophy of Biology: A Personal Memoir. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (3):375-386.score: 57.0
    Mayr has made both conceptual and professional contributions to the establishment of the history and philosophy of biology. His conceptual contributions include, among many others, the notion of population thinking. He has also played an important role in the establishment of history and philosophy of biology as viable professional disciplines.
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  8. Michael Lewis (2005). Indian Science for Indian Tigers?: Conservation Biology and the Question of Cultural Values. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):185 - 207.score: 57.0
    The implementation of Project Tiger in India, 1973-1974, was justly hailed as a triumph of international environmental advocacy. It occurred as a growing number of conservation-oriented biologists were beginning to argue forcefully for scientifically managed conservation of species and ecosystems -- the same scientists who would, by the mid-1980s, call themselves conservation biologists. Although India accepted international funds to implement Project Tiger, it strictly limited research posts to Government of India Foresters, against the protests of Indian and US biologists who (...)
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  9. Marianne Sommer (2008). History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473 - 528.score: 57.0
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the (...)
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  10. Ron Amundson (1998). Typology Reconsidered: Two Doctrines on the History of Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):153-177.score: 51.0
    Recent historiography of 19th century biology supports the revision of two traditional doctrines about the history of biology. First, the most important and widespread biological debate around the time of Darwin was not evolution versus creation, but biological functionalism versus structuralism. Second, the idealist and typological structuralist theories of the time were not particularly anti-evolutionary. Typological theories provided argumentation and evidence that was crucial to the refutation of Natural Theological creationism. The contrast between functionalist and structuralist approaches (...)
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  11. Jane Maienschein (2001). On Cloning: Advocating History of Biology in the Public Interest. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):423 - 432.score: 51.0
    Cloning -- the process of creating a cell, tissue line or even a complete organism from a single cell -- or the strands that led to the cloning of a mammal, Dolly, are not new. Yet the media coverage of Dolly's inception raised a range of reactions from fear or moral repulsion, to cautious optimism. The implications for controlling human reproduction were clearly in the forefront, though many issues about animals emerged as well. On topics of public interest such as (...)
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  12. James G. Lennox (2001). Aristotle's Philosophy of Biology: Studies in the Origins of Life Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 51.0
    In addition to being one of the world's most influential philosophers, Aristotle can also be credited with the creation of both the science of biology and the philosophy of biology. He was the first thinker to treat the investigations of the living world as a distinct inquiry with its own special concepts and principles. This book focuses on a seminal event in the history of biology - Aristotle's delineation of a special branch of theoretical knowledge devoted (...)
     
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  13. Michael Lansing (2002). Environmental Ethics, Green Politics and the History of Predator Biology. Ethics, Place and Environment 5 (1):43 – 49.score: 48.0
    Understanding the ethics and politics of environmentalism, as well as predator biology, means thinking in new ways about objectivity. The history of predator biology shows how scientists order nature as they interact with non-humans. If science ultimately orders nature as its comprehends it, the implications for environmental ethics and politics, which continue to call on the authority of objective science, loom large.
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  14. Evelyn Fox Keller (1990). Physics and the Emergence of Molecular Biology: A History of Cognitive and Political Synergy. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 23 (3):389 - 409.score: 48.0
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  15. Peter J. Bowler (1994). Are the Arthropoda a Natural Group? An Episode in the History of Evolutionary Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (2):177 - 213.score: 48.0
  16. Richard M. Burian, Jean Gayon & Doris Zallen (1988). The Singular Fate of Genetics in the History of French Biology, 1900-1940. Journal of the History of Biology 21 (3):357 - 402.score: 48.0
    In this study we have examined the reception of Mendelism in France from 1900 to 1940, and the place of some of the extra-Mendelian traditions of research that contributed to the development of genetics in France after World War II.
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  17. Joel B. Hagen (1999). Naturalists, Molecular Biologists, and the Challenges of Molecular Evolution. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):321 - 341.score: 48.0
    Biologists and historians often present natural history and molecular biology as distinct, perhaps conflicting, fields in biological research. Such accounts, although supported by abundant evidence, overlook important areas of overlap between these areas. Focusing upon examples drawn particularly from systematics and molecular evolution, I argue that naturalists and molecular biologists often share questions, methods, and forms of explanation. Acknowledging these interdisciplinary efforts provides a more balanced account of the development of biology during the post-World War II era.
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  18. Libby Robin & Jane Carruthers (2011). Introduction: Environmental History and the History of Biology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (1):1-14.score: 48.0
  19. Roberta L. Millstein, History and Philosophy of Biology Resources.score: 48.0
    Links relating to the history and philosophy of biology, assembled by Roberta L. Millstein: reference works, societies, journals, historians and philosophers of biology with papers online, blogs, other resources in the history and philosophy of biology.
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  20. Carolyn Price (2002). Rationality, Biology and Optimality. Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):613-634.score: 48.0
    A historical theory of rational norms claims that, if we are supposed to think rationally, this is because it is biologically normal for us to do so. The historical theorist is committed to the view that we are supposed to think rationally only if, in the past, adult humans sometimes thought rationally. I consider whether there is any plausible model of rational norms that can be adopted by the historical theorist that is compatible with the claim that adult human beings (...)
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  21. Daniel J. Nicholson & Richard Gawne (2014). Rethinking Woodger's Legacy in the Philosophy of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 47 (2):243-292.score: 48.0
    The writings of Joseph Henry Woodger (1894–1981) are often taken to exemplify everything that was wrongheaded, misguided, and just plain wrong with early twentieth-century philosophy of biology. Over the years, commentators have said of Woodger: (a) that he was a fervent logical empiricist who tried to impose the explanatory gold standards of physics onto biology, (b) that his philosophical work was completely disconnected from biological science, (c) that he possessed no scientific or philosophical credentials, and (d) that his (...)
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  22. Phillip R. Sloan (1985). Review: Ernst Mayr on the History of Biology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 18 (1):145 - 153.score: 48.0
  23. David Bearman (2006). Survey of Sources for the History of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: An Introductory Report. Annals of Science 33 (4):395-397.score: 48.0
    (1976). Survey of sources for the history of biochemistry and molecular biology: an introductory report. Annals of Science: Vol. 33, No. 4, pp. 395-397.
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  24. Alix Cohen (2009). Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology and History. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 48.0
    Machine generated contents note: Freedom and the Human Sciences * The Model of Biological Science and its Implications for the Human Sciences * The Answer to the Question What Is Man? * Pragmatic Anthropology * Philosophical History * Conclusion * Bibliography Freedom and the Human Sciences * The Model of Biological Science and its Implications for the Human Sciences * The Answer to the Question What Is Man? * Pragmatic Anthropology * Philosophical History * Conclusion * Bibliography.
     
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  25. Justin Leiber (2002). Philosophy, Engineering, Biology, and History: A Vindication of Turing's Views About the Distinction Between the Cognitive and Physical Sciences. Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 14 (1):29-37.score: 48.0
    Alan Turing draws a firm line between the mental and the physical, between the cognitive and physical sciences. For Turing, following a tradition that went back to D=Arcy Thompson, if not Geoffroy and Lucretius, throws talk of function, intentionality, and final causes from biology as a physical science. He likens Amother nature@ to the earnest A. I. scientist, who may send to school disparate versions of the Achild machine,@ eventually hoping for a test-passer but knowing that the vagaries of (...)
     
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  26. Sahotra Sarkar (1996). Philosophy, History, and Molecular Biology—Introduction. In , The Philosophy and History of Molecular Biology: New Perspectives. Kluwer Academic. 1--13.score: 48.0
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  27. Christian C. Young (1998). Defining the Range: Carrying Capacity in the History of Wildlife Biology and Ecology. Journal of the History of Biology 31 (1):61-83.score: 48.0
     
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  28. Jason Scott Robert, Jane Maienschein & Manfred D. Laubichler (2006). Systems Bioethics and Stem Cell Biology. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):19-31.score: 45.0
    The complexities of modern science are not adequately reflected in many bioethical discussions. This is especially problematic in highly contested cases where there is significant pressure to generate clinical applications fast, as in stem cell research. In those cases a more integrated approach to bioethics, which we call systems bioethics, can provide a useful framework to address ethical and policy issues. Much as systems biology brings together different experimental and methodological approaches in an integrative way, systems bioethics integrates aspects (...)
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  29. W. Van Laar (1973). A. D. Breck & W. Yourgrau. Biology, History and Natural Philosophy. Proc. 2nd Int. Coll. Univ. Denver.-Plenum Press, New York & London, XII + 355 P., 1972. [REVIEW] Acta Biotheoretica 22 (4).score: 45.0
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  30. Russ Hodge (2009). Evolution: The History of Life on Earth. Facts on File.score: 45.0
    Describes evolution, including the history of the theory, biological classification, societal and legal ramifications, and the connection between evolution and ...
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  31. Jane Maienschein & Manfred D. Laubichler (2010). The Embryo Project: An Integrated Approach to History, Practices, and Social Contexts of Embryo Research. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):1 - 16.score: 45.0
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  32. E. Balaban (2006). Cognitive Developmental Biology: History, Process and Fortune's Wheel. Cognition 101 (2):298-332.score: 45.0
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  33. Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (2010). An Epistemology of the Concrete: Twentieth-Century Histories of Life. Duke University Press.score: 45.0
    Ludwik Fleck, Edmund Husserl : on the historicity of scientific knowledge -- Gaston Bachelard : the concept of "phenomenotechnique" -- Georges Canguilhem : epistemological history -- Pisum : Carl Correns's experiments on Xenia, 1896-99 -- Eudorina : Max Hartmann's experiments on biological regulation in protozoa, 1914-21 -- Ephestia : Alfred Kähn's experimental design for a developmental physiological -- Genetics, 1924-45 -- Tobacco mosaic virus : virus research at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes for Biochemistry and Biology, 1937-45 -- The (...)
     
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  34. Allan Gotthelf & James G. Lennox (eds.) (1987). Philosophical Issues in Aristotle's Biology. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Aristotle's biological works - constituting over 25% of his surviving corpus and for centuries largely unstudied by philosophically oriented scholars - have been the subject of an increasing amount of attention of late. This collection brings together some of the best work that has been done in this area, with the aim of exhibiting the contribution that close study of these treatises can make to the understanding of Aristotle's philosophy. The book is divided into four parts, each with an introduction (...)
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  35. Robert Richards (2007). The Moral Grammar of Narratives in History of Biology: The Case of Haeckel and Nazi Biology. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press. 429--51.score: 42.0
    I exhort you never to debase the moral currency or to lower the standard of rectitude, but to try others by the final maxim that governs your own lives and to suffer no man and no cause to escape the undying penalty which history has the power to inflict on wrong.2 In 1902, the year after Acton died, the president of the American Historical association, Henry Lea, in dubious celebration of his British colleague, responded to the exordium with a (...)
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  36. Richard Dawkins (2004). The Ancestor's Tale: A Pilgrimage to the Dawn of Evolution. Houghton Mifflin.score: 42.0
    The renowned biologist and thinker Richard Dawkins presents his most expansive work yet: a comprehensive look at evolution, ranging from the latest developments in the field to his own provocative views. Loosely based on the form of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Dawkins's Tale takes us modern humans back through four billion years of life on our planet. As the pilgrimage progresses, we join with other organisms at the forty "rendezvous points" where we find a common ancestor. The band of pilgrims swells (...)
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  37. Rebecca Stott (2012). Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution. Spiegel & Grau.score: 42.0
    Citing an 1859 letter that accused Charles Darwin of failing to acknowledge his scientific predecessors, a chronicle of the collective history of evolution dedicates each chapter to an evolutionary thinker, from Aristotle and da Vinci to ...
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  38. Edward J. Larson (2004). Evolution: The Remarkable History of a Scientific Theory. Modern Library.score: 42.0
    “I often said before starting, that I had no doubt I should frequently repent of the whole undertaking.” So wrote Charles Darwin aboard The Beagle , bound for the Galapagos Islands and what would arguably become the greatest and most controversial discovery in scientific history. But the theory of evolution did not spring full-blown from the head of Darwin. Since the dawn of humanity, priests, philosophers, and scientists have debated the origin and development of life on earth, and with (...)
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  39. Sahotra Sarkar (ed.) (1996). The Philosophy and History of Molecular Biology: New Perspectives. Kluwer Academic.score: 42.0
  40. Jean-Paul Gaudillière (2009). New Wine in Old Bottles? The Biotechnology Problem in the History of Molecular Biology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 40 (1):20-28.score: 39.0
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  41. Timothy Shanahan (2004). The Evolution of Darwinism: Selection, Adaptation, and Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Cambridge University Press.score: 39.0
    No other scientific theory has had as tremendous an impact on our understanding of the world as Darwin's theory as outlined in his Origin of Species, yet from the very beginning the theory has been subject to controversy. The Evolution of Darwinism focuses on three issues of debate - the nature of selection, the nature and scope of adaptation, and the question of evolutionary progress. It traces the varying interpretations to which these issues were subjected from the beginning and the (...)
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  42. Marsha L. Richmond (2000). T. H. Huxley's Criticism of German Cell Theory: An Epigenetic and Physiological Interpretation of Cell Structure. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (2):247 - 289.score: 39.0
    In 1853, the young Thomas Henry Huxley published a long review of German cell theory in which he roundly criticized the basic tenets of the Schleiden-Schwann model of the cell. Although historians of cytology have dismissed Huxley's criticism as based on an erroneous interpretation of cell physiology, the review is better understood as a contribution to embryology. "The Cell-theory" presents Huxley's "epigenetic" interpretation of histological organization emerging from changes in the protoplasm to replace the "preformationist" cell theory of Schleiden and (...)
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  43. Richard W. Burkhardt (1994). Ernst Mayr: Biologist-Historian. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (3):359-371.score: 39.0
    Ernst Mayr''s historical writings began in 1935 with his essay Bernard Altum and the territory theory and have continued up through his monumentalGrowth of Biological Thought (1982) and hisOne Long Argument: Charles Darwin and the Genesis of Modern Evolutionary Thought (1991). Sweeping in their scope, forceful in their interpretation, enlisted on behalf of the clarification of modern concepts and of a broad view of biology, these writings provide both insights and challenges for the historian of biology. Mayr''s general (...)
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  44. Stephen Jay Gould, "The Pattern of Life's History" Stuart Kauffman: Steve is Extremely Bright, Inventive. He Thoroughly Understands Paleontology; He Thoroughly Understands Evolutionary Biology. He Has.. [REVIEW]score: 39.0
    Stuart Kauffman: Steve is extremely bright, inventive. He thoroughly understands paleontology; he thoroughly understands evolutionary biology. He has performed an enormous service in getting people to think about punctuated equilibrium, because you see the process of stasis/sudden change, which is a puzzle. It's the cessation of change for long periods of time. Since you always have mutations, why don't things continue changing? You either have to say that the particular form is highly adapted, optimal, and exists in a stable (...)
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  45. Ralph J. Greenspan & Bernard J. Baars (2005). Consciousness Eclipsed: Jacques Loeb, Ivan P. Pavlov, and the Rise of Reductionistic Biology After 1900. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):219-230.score: 39.0
  46. Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis (1999). Living with Your Biographical Subject: Special Problems of Distance, Privacy and Trust in the Biography of G. Ledyard Stebbins Jr. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):421 - 438.score: 39.0
    This paper explores the special problems encountered by the biographer of a living scientific subject. In particular, it explores the complex of problems that emerges from the intense interpersonal dynamic involving issues of distance, privacy and trust. It also explores methodological problems having to do with oral history interviews and other supporting documentation. It draws on the personal experience of the author and the biographical subject of G. Ledyard Stebbins Jr., the botanist, geneticist and evolutionist. It also offers prescriptives (...)
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  47. Marsha L. Richmond (2006). The 'Domestication' of Heredity: The Familial Organization of Geneticists at Cambridge University, 1895-1910. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (3):565 - 605.score: 39.0
    In the early years of Mendelism, 1900-1910, William Bateson established a productive research group consisting of women and men studying biology at Cambridge. The empirical evidence they provided through investigating the patterns of hereditary in many different species helped confirm the validity of the Mendelian laws of heredity. What has not previously been well recognized is that owing to the lack of sufficient institutional support, the group primarily relied on domestic resources to carry out their work. Members of the (...)
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  48. Ludwig Edelmann (2002). Life at the Cell and Below-Cell Level: The Hidden History of a Fundamental Revolution in Biology (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (4):628-631.score: 39.0
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  49. Edward Manier (1980). History, Philosophy and Sociology of Biology: A Family Romance. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 11 (1):1-24.score: 39.0
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  50. William A. Rottschaefer (2001). What Can History Tell Us About Founding Ethics on Biology? Biology and Philosophy 16 (1):131-144.score: 39.0
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